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This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

April 03, 1918 - Image 5

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1918-04-03

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11

LANS LID IN 1652 TO*
ESTABLISH OBSERYATORY

ANN ARBOR STEAM:
DYE WORKS
Established 1887

FRENCH DRY CLEANING, PRESS-
ING, AND STEAM CLEANING AT
(CITY PRICES.
YOU ARE CORDIALLY INVITED TO
INSPECT OUR WORK.

FOR
EVERYTHING
ELECTRICAL

MICHIGAN STUDENTS IN ASTRO.
NOMY HAVE HAD GREAT
INFLUENCE
One-half mile northeast from the
center of the campus there rises a
huge gray dome forty feet in diameter.
A source of wonder at first to the new
student, it later inspires a feeling of
awe when it is learned that this is
the Detroit Observatory of the Uni-
versity of Michigan.
Far from the madding campus, the
Observatory stands in.solitary dignity
on a high stretch of land overlook-
ing Ann Arbor and the Huron river
valley The original tract of land was
only four acres, at the northeast lim-
its of the city, but in 1910 there were
added 26 acres, extending as far as
the University Botanical gardens. The
original building was completed in
1854 and, due to its having been fin-
anced by several Detroit people, was
called the Detroit Observatory.
President Tappan Outlines Plans
An interesting story is told concern-
ing the founding of the Observatory.
Mr. Henry N. Walker of Detroit, was
present when President Tappan deliv-
ered his inaugural address in 1852.
The new president outlined his plans
for further scientific instruction at the
University, especially in astronomy.
Following the address, Mr. Walker
called upon Dr. Tappan and proposed'
soliciting subscriptions form several
Detroit people for the purpose of found-'
ing an observatory. The plan was tak-
en up and in a short time $15,000 was
raised. An order was immediately,
placed for a refracting telescope of
12 inches, which at that time wasthe
third largest in the- world, the 'two~
larger being at the Imperial Russian
Observatory and Harvard College Ob-
servatory. It was the-first large tele-'
scope built entirely in the United
States, and, has since been used for
instruction and in the observation of
comets and astrolites.
Obtain Meridan Circle in Europe
In 1853, plans for the building was!
begun and President Tappan, who was'
travelling in Europe, visited several
observatories and bought the Mer-
ida Circle, the gift of Mar. Walk'r at
the time of founding the Observatory.
This instrument is now being used for;
practical instruction and in time ob-'
servations.
Prof. William J. Hussey, present di-
rector of the Observatory, was ap-
pointed in 1905 and has since done
considerable to increase the facilities
for teaching astronomy and to bring'
the department up 1b its present high{
ranking. .He supervised the construc-
tion of the large reflecting telescope,
which was begun in 1906 and which'
was carried on almost entirely in the'
engineering and observatory shops of
the University, at a total cost of $24,-
000. The dome above this instrument
is 40 feet in diameter is turned by7
means of an electric motor,

USINESS STABILITY IS
SHOWN IN BANK REPORTS
AUTOMOBILE MANUFACTURERS
RESTRICT OUTPUT OF PLEAS-
URE CARS
Chicago, April 2.-Confidence in the
stability of the business and banking
situation is the tenor of reports re-
ceived from all parts of the seventh
federal reserve district, according to
a statement issued by the Federal
Reserve bank of this city.
The prospects of winter wheat can-
not be foretold as it is as yet too early
to forecast with any degree of ac-
curacy. Thge are some reports of
damage to the corps by freezes in the
state of Iowa and Michigan. Illinois
and Indiana wheat stood the severe
weather well and the crop is prom-
ising. Efforts are being made to save
As much as possible of the corn, and
,through co-operation by the roads this
grain is being moved rapidly, taxing
the capacity of the dryers.
Restrict Output of Pleasure Cars
Automobile manufacturers have re-
sticted the output of pleasure cars in
line with government requirements
Many are employing their facilities
on truck orders and airplane parts.
Building and construction has been at
a standstill for the past six months,
and what little is being done is quite
generally restricted to war require-
ments.
Candy manufacturers report stead
increase in sales, due to the advance
in price. Tonnage is limited by sugar
'restrictions. It is reported that con-
sumption of candy and chocolate by
cantonment and training stations is
enormous.
Sugar and Flour Still Scarce
Dry goods continue to rise in price,
but there is apparently no effect on
buying. Grocers are having difficulty
in getting the two great staples, sugar
and flour, though the former is be-
coming more plentiful.. The piano in-
dustry seem shighly satisfactory, an
a good volume of new orders is re-
ported. Jewelry houses experienced a
slight slackening in volume during the
past month, but the outlook for an
early resumption of normal activity
is said to be promising.
Sharp Advances in Woolens
.Government demand for woollens
has advanced the prices, of raw ma-
terial to the highest point ever known.
The general feeling seems to be that
government control will eventually be
applied to maximum prices. Retail
clothiers are buying rapidly for fall
delivery. Sharp advances will be
made in overcoats and suits. The
usual sacrifice of winter clothing is
not in evidence. It is said collections
will have close scrutiny of credit men
on account of the tendency towards
excessive, high priced inventories on{
the part of retailers who control small
capital.
to give advanced instruction in theo-
rical and practical astronomy, and the
officers and instructors have always
considered the work as an important
part of their duties. As a result of
this, many important positions have
been filled and work done by Michigan]
students and they and their studentsl
have had a wide influence on the de-1
velopment of astronomy.]

Co.

SEASON.

TO TALK WITH YOU

a
1k

fSnappy New"

Neckties and

For Easter Wear

Varsity Toggery Sh
1107 S. University Ave.

ABOUT GETTIN(
-TER KODAK FO

' WHOLESOME

IT'S T

Try our Drinks from
our Sanitary Fountain

No Job too Small or t
WASHTENAI
ELECTRIC SH
"The Shop of Qua
If It's not right we mak
- PHONE 273 -

WE WOU]

oo Large
lOp
Ility"
:e it right
117 Puar
Ypsilanti

Fountain of Youth
EICorner State and Liberty
pDELIGH"TFUL REFRE
Martin Guitars and Mandol
Best value onthe market
Prices: $15.00 - $25.00 and up

of

Schaeberle & Son's Mi
110 So. Main Street

0 ~

I I A200 E. Washington
IAnn Arbor

I

._
t .,-

Try our Chop Suey
Chinese and American Dishes

on

WA! KING LOG

Joe Gin, Prop.
413 S.State St.'

Phone 1244-M

1

Realize for yourself the
pleasure of Home Cooked
Food. Prices Reasonable.
Service Paramount.
TRUBEY S
218 S. Main Street

_CITY NEWS
Miss Winona Saunders, secretary of
the local Civic association, is. distri-
buting tickets for the annual banquet
of that organization which will be held
April 12. James O. Fagan, active in
industrial conservation work. will be
the principal speaker at the banquet.
Ernest White, deputy sheriff, who
was arrested Monday afternoon by
Officer Robert Clark appeared for ex-
amination yesterday morning in Judge
Doty's court and pleaded not guilty
to the charge of drunk and disorder-
ly. His trial will be held in Judge
Doty's court next Monday morning.

Exceptional
of
Style and

Your

will co

if made
by

A. F, MARL
516 E. William St.

~II

will be planted were grown in the
forestry nursery on South State street.

Submarine Torpedoes.British Steamer
London, April I.-The British arm-
ed boarding steamer Tithonus was
torpedoed and sunk by a German sub-
marine March 28, according to an offi-
ci'al statement, issued by the admiral-
ty. One mercantile officer and three
naval ratings were lost.

Build Students' Observatory
A students' observatory for instruc-
tion was built in 1881 and in the fol-
lowing year, the Observatory shop.
was built for the purpose of repairing!
and constructing auxiliary instru-
ments. Modern seismographs and as-
tronomical cameras have also been
'added to the equipment.-
Regular metrological observations
have been taken at the Observatory
since 1881 at 7 o'clock each evening
and reportstare sentrat the end of each
month to the central United States
weather bureau station. Observations;
are also sent regularly to the Chicago
station for the use of the corn and
wheat section of that bureau, and daily
readings are sent to the Ann Arbor
Times-News for publication.

White
pany's
work
Prof.
epart-
mts t

s#
r '

tion

I STUDENTS ATTENTION!'
The Ottmer Boarding House will be
open through Spring vacation.-Adv.

Leave Copy
at
Students'
Supply Store

FOR uAL
nd, Calcu- FOR SALE-Two $5.50 May Festival
,ining im- Tickets, second balcony, $3.00 each.
11 Walker, Mr. Richmond, 639-J.

Fill Important Positlons
"It has been our plan," said Profes-
sor Hussey, in commenting on the
work of the Observatory, "tokcreate
a department where we can specialize
and accomplish first class work, in-
stead of distributing our efforts over
several fields without any great de-
velopment along any one line., It
was with this in view that the reflect-
ing telescope was constructed." Ac-
cording to Professor Hussey, this in-
strument is one of the most efficient in
world for spectroscopic work.
The University of Michigan was one
of the first schools in the country

Ordnance Uniforms Are Mixed
Camouflage in its superlative de-
gree may be the term applied to the
uniforms of those taking the ordnance
course in the University, as by a
strange freak of fate the trousers are
woollen and the coats a pure cotton
fabric, a travesty in outfitting that
cannot produce otherwise than men-'
tal anguish to the wearers. Most of
the ordnance men were provided with
uniforms at Columbus and the un-
usual condition is due to a shipping
mixup whereby the woollen coats or-
iginally intended for that destination;
were sent to some other place, cotton
ones being delivered instead. Although
some of the ordnance corps have pur-
chased their own private military
habit,. the double fabric' combination
is much in evidence about the cam-
pus.
BEAUTY SHOP
Miss Mable Rowe. Shampooing,
Manicuring, Massage and Chiropody.
Open evenings by appointment. 326
N. 6th Ave., Cor. Detroit St. Phone
2402.-Adv.

The congregation of the Unitarian
church entertained with a banquet
Monday evening in honor of Rev. R. S.
Loring, who will leave the pastorate
here to engage in theological work in
Boston. Prof. E. R. Sunderland of the
Law school, acted as toastmaster. The
Reverend Loring will speak' in the
Unitarian church Sunday and will
leave for Boston next week.
It is very probable that work on war
gardens will exceed the records of
last year for according to the appli-
cations for land that have been made
to the Civic association there will be
a large number of amateur farmers.
Untilled land is to be given to the
Civic association for temporary use to
increase production.

-1

Good Lunches of Ri
10C all the'
Chinese and American (
Short Orders
Michigan Inn 601
all arrangements for t
which opens the followir
instructions will be
workers at the banquet.
to the members of the I
tee, there will also be si
from Detroit. It ,is hop
Arbor will be able to f
in the shortest possible t
Lieut. Alfred T. Dale
last Thursday at Camp I
was buried in the Fore
etery. Services were con(
uncle's home, by Rev. J.
of the Baptist church las
Daley enlisted in the r
for a term of three years
ago. He was honorably
but immediately re-enlis
other term of seven yea
'death was the result of
pneumonia.

OR SALE-One $6.00 Block A May
Festival Ticket for $4.50. Call Walk-
er, 1016.
OR SALE-Old Town Canoe-fully
equipped-excellent condition- call

In the city elections which were
held Monday the following aldermen
were' elected to hold office for two
years: First ward, Samuel Heusel;
second ward, Oswald Mayer; third
ward, Theodore Prochnow; fourth
ward, C. T. Donnelly; sixth ward,
John MacGregor; seventh ward,
George Lutz.
The last contingent of the first draft
squota from this city entrained to
Camp Custer yesterday morning. A
send-off in the nature of a patriotic
parade was given to the young men.
"President Wilson ought to be placed
in front of the trenches and shot,"
were the seditious. remarks made yes-
terday moining at the Huron farms
by Charles Bailey of this city. He
was arrested and will receive a hear-
ing on the charge of making seditious
utterances.

Rewa

1211i-R.

'"""""

WANTUD
WANTED -Reliable student during
summer vacation to fill responsible
position. Good salary. Call 359-M

We Represent the
Steinway, Knabe, Vose & Sons, Sohmer, Grinnell Bros.,
Sterling, Shominger, and many other makes.
The world's famous Pianola Player Pianos,, Victor
Victrolas. SATISFACTION, GUARANTEED.

Forestry Club to
Members of the F
hold a meeting this e
estry farm. They w
on the interurban v
at ,5:50 o'clock this
member will take
will be served at ti
University does not
the Natural Science
evening we will con

an exper-

GRINNELL BROS., 116 s. Main

..

Workers for the
drive will hold a.
evening of this wee

I

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