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This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

March 31, 1918 - Image 2

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1918-03-31

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THE MICHIGAN DAILY

SUNDAY, MARCH 31, 1

EMBER ASSOCIATE PRESS
ssociated Press is exclusively entitled
use for republication of all news dis-
credited to it or not otherwise credit-
his paper and also the local news
dherein.
al newspaper at the University of
n. Published every morning except
during the university year.
d atrthe postoffice at Ann Arbor as
:lass matter.
s: Ann Arbor Press Building.
s: Business, 960; Editorial, 2414.
lunications not to exceed 3oo words,
:, the signature not necessarily to ap-
print but as an evidence of faith, and
of events will be published in The
t the discretion of the E;ditor, if left
office or irThe Daily notice box in
n corridor of the general library where
ces are collected at 7:30 o'clock each
nsigned communications willbreceive no
ation. No manuscript will be returned
he writer sends postage for that pur-
'T. McDonald......Managing Editor
Makinson..........Business Manager

CONGREGATIONAL CHURCH
-10:30 A. M.
LLOYD C. DOUGLAS
Preacbes on
"LIFE AFTER DEATH"
6:30 P. M.
Dr. Clyde B. Stouffer
speaws on
"THE PERMANENCE OF
PERSONALITY"

FIRST BAPTIST
CHURCH
and the
CHURCH OF CHRIST
10:30 A. M.-Easter Ser-
vice. "The Easter Hope
-Life in the Midst of
Death."
Specal Easter Music.

ss

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Unita rian. Church V
State and Ituron Streets 1
10:30-Easter service with special
music and address on Wy We Lib-
eralis Celebrate Easter. By Rev. R,J
S. Loring.
6:30-Students' Society with address
by Mr. Loring on The Greatest Mys-
tery.
RAPS FRESHMAN HAZING
AL"MNUS BLAMES AUTHORITIES
FOR NOT INTERFERING WITH
SOPHOMORES' PROCEEDINGS

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Unusual Baran

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TENNIS RACKETS
zoo Rackets to select from-all the leading makes
RACKET RESTRINCING PROMPTLY DONE
Wahr's University Bookstores
MAIN STREET STATE STREET

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Clark, Jr..............News
t G. WVilson............City
Schermerhorn, Jr.......Sports
A. Swaney... .'..Associate
e L. Roeser ....,.. Tel1c:egraph

Editor
Editor
Editor
Editor
Eaditor

[red C. Mighell.........Women's Editor
garet H. Cooley........Literary Editor.
E. Cholette.......Publication Manager
nard WohlIt....Circulation Manager
old R. Smith...........Credit Manager
NIGHT EDITORS
sull C. Bla.r nes Walter R. Atlas
les R. Osius, Jr. Mark K.R hlbert
William W. Fox
REPORTERS
. McAlpine Paul A. Shinkman
se Irish -Philip Slomovitz
ence M. Price Frances Broene
Brown Milton Marx
ace E. Hunter K. Frances Handibo
id B. Landis Edgar L. Rice
rude Setrgeant Vincent II. Riorden
Rtilla :A. Nelson
BUSINESS STAFF
A. Leitzinger Harry D. Ilause
H 1. Cress Katherine Kilpatrick
n Christen Frances H. Macdonald
. Schmiedeskamp Agnes Abele
-ge A. Cadwell, Jr. L. A. Storrer
Frances H. Case
SUNDAY, MARCH 31, 1918.
Night Editor-Russell Barnes
IN MEMORIAM
wo years have flown since the day
news was flashed over the coun-
telling of the death of Michigan's
nd Old Man, James B. Angell. That
s caused thousands of Michigan
. to go in mourning.,
wo years ago, tomorrow, he died,
what a change for Michigan. Our
ks are thinned by war's grisly
d. Down on dusty ' Ferry field
lines of khaki clad students are
ching with measured tread. The
or looks in, vain for his freshman
m who accompanied him in salut-
the silver haired president three
s ago.
new world has rolled'"around for
higan. Yet who can say that the
versity has not stood the test of
Our service flags are dotted with
s, our laboratories are filled with
eagerly working on experiments
trengthen the steel sinews of our
y and navy.
the "Grand Old Man" could come
E to the school which is his great-.
monument and see Michigan's war
activity, he would nod his sage
1, and say, "You have done well.
ve on, Michigan."

ter. It is quite probable that wom n
may be of use in poultry, fruit, Er
truck farming. But on the general
farm, real patriotic service should be
offered where it will actually relieve
[he labor situation-in the kitchen.
This is not so attractive but it is emi-
nently more feasible from the point of
view of the capabilities of the girls.
It would release the farm woman for
field labor where necessary and solve
the endless "hired girl" problem. It
takes sterling patriotism to give un-
romantic and even menial service, but
your true patriot always attempts the
possible.
The war department has failed to
classify the R,,, 0. T. C. The office
Cynic. says that some of the cadets
in uniform have been seen by the of-
ficials at Washington.
Vernon Castle's widow has given
his entire wardrobe to the Red Cross.
His pumps will probably be of great.
use to the sprightly convalescents.
Paris eats more horses, says a
headline. True to type, exclaimed the
city editor. First theymdressed like
them, now they eat them.

Ameen Bad, a Turk in'
Park, has been arrested for
man with a hammer. Still
there is nothing in a name.

Highland
hitting a
it is said

'Twas 'the day before recess and all
through U-hall
Not a student was stirring, they'd left,
one and all,
The profs looked around at the class-
rooms so bare
And pretended they wished that the
students were there.
But all of a sudden there arose such a
clatter,
They ran to the door to see what was
the matter.
"Good heavens," moaned one, "I fear
me, alas!S
That now I will have to conduct my
darn class!"
For there at the door stood an inno-
cent rook
Who'd forgotten the date and brought
with him a book.
"See here," said the Prof., "you poor
yearling nut,
Today is the day we expect you to
cut."
Betting is Against Our Principles,
Ethelbert
Cary:-You probably call yourself
sincere, yet here's betting 10-1 that
you've done this:, You've been intro-
duced,,to an awful botch with a cold
fishy hand-shake, and you've grabbed
his fin and, with a rilly-I-mean-it air,
you've said, "Mighty glad to meet you."
Now maybe you did it to show him
how it's done, but the odds still stand
10-1. ETHELBERT.
In order that the senior cane tra-
dition may not fall flat through lack
of men we beg to suggest that the
senior girls invest in swagger sticks.
We begged the same thing of the
women's editor and she allowed
that the ladies didn't own enough
riding-clothes.
Then We'll Spend Our Evenings at
Russki Krushok Meetings+
After Mayski firstski
When the townovitch goes dryski,
And there's noski moreovitch vodka
Norski and moreski whiskey.
Value of German Lies-Headline in
G. M. N. in A. A. Three buffalo nickels
in Marshall Field's.
More Rooks Contributed for Soldiers
More books for the soldiers' camps
were contributed last week to the Uni-
versity Library, than during the week
before. A single collection of 230
books was received yesterday by Li-
brarian W. W. Bishop.

Editor, The Michigan Daily:
Each year the night scenes on State
street awaken the inquiry as to where
the Student council, the University
authorities, and the Ann Arbor police
spend their evening hours. No notice
is taken of the hazing of freshmen
and the annoyance of passing women.
Are first year students denied the
equal protection of the law? Many a
student is caught in his best, or only
suit of clothes, and put through per-
formances thought original by the
sophomoric mind since sophomores
were first discovered.
Must we stage a demonstration of
mob rule just as the crowd comes
from Hill auditorium merely to con-
firm the probable suspicion of the
Michigan schoolmasters as to the
rough-neck element in Ann Arbor?
And whydo three-fourths of the haz-
ers wear military suits this year?
Is it because the uniforms are Univer-
sity property, which should be worn
in preferance to one's own clothes
when there is a prospect of a fight?
ALUMNUS.
PATRIOTIC WORK W? ALU31NAE
PRAISED AT WOMEN'S BANQUET
Patriotic services rendered by Mich-
igan women were commended by Mrs.
Katharine Puncheon Pomeroy, '96, and
Dean John R. Effinger at the alumnae
banquet yesterday in Barbour gym-
nasium. Mrs. Pomeroy mentioned the
activities of alumnae in Ann Arbor and
Detroit, and Dean Effinger expressed
his gratification with the way women
had taken hold of campus affairs
where the continuance of instutitions
demanded it.
Clarissa Vyn, '18, spoke for the un-
dergraduates. She urged that the
women do everything possible to keep
alive the spirit that has been shown

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CARYATID

Come in and see the 75 watt Blue Lamp

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Gives a white light.

Just the thing to study by

H. L. SWITZER CO.

Laundry Cases
For Parcel Post

The Slater Book Shop

The latest atrocity of the'
gun was its 75 victims on Good'
Sort of a death a mile affair.

75-mile
Friday.

We Sell
MAZDA LAMPS

THE FARMERETTES I
Movements to enlist women for
arm work this summer have aroused
good deal of enthusiasm among the
romen. In the cities faddy society
irls are engaged in a wordy battle
ver the costume to be worn, which
sufficient index of their real under-
anding of and attitude toward the
gricultural situation. In the Univer-
ity our women are interesting them-
elves in the project with more ear-
est patriotism but with scarcely
reater comprehension of what the.
verage farmer needs and demands
f his "hands." College women as a
hole cannot be accused of wishing
o pose in pink gingham overalls; the
iducements which attract them are
utdoor life, the change from mental
> physical work, and a, notion that
oing farm work in groups will be a
>mpound of work and play and a
eneral all-around "lark." It is no-
ceable that the greatest optimism
bout the scheme is found among wo-
en who have never lived on -farms.
Work on a big farm is the hardest
lysical labor that can be imagined.
he muscle-hardened farmer boy who
as done it all his life is so tired at
ie end of a day in harvest season
tat no power on earth could keep him
wake after 9 o'clock. College men
'ho take to the farm in June go
trough a two-weeks' period of tor-
re from fatigue and backache in
etting used to it. What then is to be
xpected of a city-bred girl, whose
ears of indoor life have been offset
r nothing more strenuous than a few
sports?" Not to mention her utter
,oranceof farming as a science and
vocation. Neither her muscles nor
er mind have been trained for agri-
iture.
Snecialized farming is another mat-f

Production of the air craft board
seems to be limited to air.
Today is the annual church goers
day.
Preliminary apparatus meet for
freshmen and sophomores will be held.
at 4 o'clock tomorrow afternoon. Ex-
aminations in gymnasium work will
be given at the regular class hours
Monday and Tuesday. Absences must
be excused tomorrow.
There will be a rehearsal of "Am-
azons" from 4 to 6 o'clock Monday
afternoon in Sarah Caswell Angell
hall. Lady Castlejordan, Muichin'
and Youatt will report at 4 o'clock and
Billy at 4:30 o'clock.
Elections for women's organizations
will be held from 8 to '5 o'clock Tues-
day at the Women's league room in
University hall. Every woman is
urged to come out to vote.
Stylus will meet at 7:30 o'clock
Tuesday night with Margaret Cooley,
'18, 703 Forest avenue.
Two women can secure places to
earn board through the office of the
dean of women.
"WAR AND LABOR" IS SUBJECT
OF WESLEYAN GUILD LECTURE
George E. Macliwain, '90, of Bos-
ton, will deliver a lecture on "War and
Labor" at 7:30 o'clock tonight at the
Methodist church, as one of the Wes-
leyan Guild lecture series.
Mr. Macllwain is connected with a
statistical organization in Boston,
holding the position of economical
engineer. Ile is in close touch with
the metropolitan labor situation, and
is known throughout the United States
as an authority on labor troubles.
He comes highly recommended by
national officials.
FIRE DOES $200 DAAGE
To MICHIGAN UNION BUILDING

this year. Possibilities in the field
of reconstruction work were present-
ed briefly by Mrs. Mary Needham,
member of the committee of the Amer-
ican fund for French wounded. Golda
Ginsburg, ex-'18, was toastmistrees.
Between five and six hundred per-
sons attended the luncheon.
EASTER CONTATA TO BE GIVEN
AT FIRST METHODIST CHURCH
The First Methodist church quartet
and chorus will give an Easter cantata
entitled "Death and Life" at 10:30
o'clock this morning.
H. Gilbert King, grad., will give an
illustrated talk on "China" - at the
Young Peoples' meeting at 6:30 o'clock
in the evening. Mr. George E. Mac-
Ilwain, of Boston, will speak at the
evening service, on "War and Labor."

Easter

Greetings

QUARRY DRUG CO'S
PRESCRIPTION STORE
Cor. State and N. University
Phone 308

wP

Martin Guitars and Mandolins
Best value on the market

DETROIT UNITED LINES
Between Detroit, Ann Arbor and Jacksn
(Elffective Mlay 22, 1917)
Detroit Limited and Express Cars--7:35 a
in., 8 :o a. m. and hourly to 7:10 p. lf., 9:16
a. Mi.
Kalamazoo Limited Cars---8:48 a. in 2nd
,every two hours to 6:48 U. in. ; to Lansi~ng,
'4:48 p. m
Jackson Express Cars 0ocal sto' weft of
At~n Arbor)-9:48 a. In. and every tam hours,
to : :48 A. tM.
Local Cars East Bound-5 35 a. m., 6 :4
a. i., 7:05 a. m. and ev-ry two 'noIrsW 7:o0
p., in.,8:o5 R.p.t. 9:05 P.ini., ).:CU p. mi
To Ypsilanti only, 9:20 a. i., j:io a ire,
2:05 k. in, 6:05 p. m, 9:45P. in, 1 :45 * in.,
12 :ao a. nti.. i :xo a. i. 1x:2o a. Mn. 1 salie,
change at Ypsilanti.
Local Cars West Bound-6:os a m, 7-48
a. m.. o:o n. m. 12:20 a. m.

Prices: $15.00 - $25.00 and up

Schaeberle & Son's Music House
110 So. Main Street

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Courteous and satisfactory
TREATMENT to every custom-
er, whether the account be large
or small.
The Ann Arbor Savings Bank
Incorporated 1869
Capital and Surplus, $550,000.00
Resources .........$4,000,000.00
Northwest Cor. Main & Huron.
707 North Univer~sity Ave.

)

Engraved Visiting Cards
The poorly engraved Visiting Card not only re-
flects the engraver, but the one whose name it bears.
Our engraving is accepted as the standard of per-
fection both in style and quality.
This season the popular demand is shaded Roman
and shaded Old English. We also make all other
styles, such as script, block, Roman, Spanish and
French script.
MAY WE SEND YOU OUR STYLE
SHEET AND- PRICES?
SPECIAL PRICES IN CLUB LOTS
Gregory, Mayer & Thomr Co.
19-25 Cadillac Square
DETROIT

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IF IT'S ANYTHING
PHOTOGRAPHIC, ASK
SWAIN
113 East University
ITUTTLE'S
means perfection in the ser-
vice of
LUNCHES And SODAS
~ TYPEWRITERS
For Sale and Rent
TYPEWRITING
Mimeograping
Fraternity and Social Stationery
0. D. MORRILL
322 South State Street
SHORTHAND
TYPEWRITING
800KKEEPING
PENMANSHIP
Classes Just Starting. Enroll
Today;.
HAMILTON
BUSINESS COLLEGE
State and William

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Two hundred dollars damage was
clone to the basement of the Michigan
Union early yesterday morning by a fire,
starting in the furnace room. The
steward of the Union was awakened
at about 3 o'clock by the smoke, and
discovered several of the basement
partitions ablaze. The fire department
extinguished the blaze.
The loss is covered by insurance.
TYPEWRITERS FOR, RENT-Wood-
ward & Washington. 8-9 A. A. Sav-
ings Bank Bldg. Phone 866.-Adv.

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