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March 31, 1918 - Image 1

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1918-03-31

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

THE WEATHER
PROBABLY RAIN
TODAY

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ASSOCIATED
PRESS
DAY AN ) NIG,'i' WIRE
SERVI(P

VOL. XXVIII. No. 130. ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN, SUNDAY, MARCH 31, 1918. PRICE THREE CENTS

__ '

FASHION DEGREES
KHAKI AND BLUE
PROPERAPPARELS
EASTER SEASON IS ANNIVERSARY
OF AMERICA'S ENTRANCE
INTO CONFLICT
YEAR HAS INFLUENCED
CAMPUS LIFE GREATLY
University Women Send Gift Flowers
to Hospitals; Give Candy Eggs
To Sick Children-

It Is Influenza,
Not Spring Feverl

BAKER PLEASED AT
OFFER OF FORGES

If you have that tired, groggy feel-
ing accompanied by a loss of appetite,
chills, continual headache, and a gen-
eral indisposition towards work, you
are merely one of the two thousand
University students in the grip of the
now prevalent influenza epidemic.
"Two years ago we had a similar
epidemic in the late spring. The dis-
ease is contagious but seldom serious
in its effects. The health service staff
this past week has been working over-
time with student cases. It spreads
with great rapidity in fraternity, sor-
ority, or rooming houses as soon as
one case is in evidence," was the
statement made by Dr. Warren E. For-
sythe of the health service last eve-
ning, refuting the theories about the
campus that the unusual sick list was
due to the dust in the air, or the corn
in the present "war" bread.
NAALRESERES TAKE
20 'MORE MICHIGAN MEN
MEN CALLED ARE TO REPORT IN
DETROIT BY 10 O'CLOCK
TOMORROW

r

Predicts ThatAmerican People
Ratify Pershing's Action
Enithusiastically

Will

Fashion has designated khaki and
blue as the colors of the season. With
the chimes of the Resurrection day the
mothers of America will either march'
proudly to church beside the manly
form of a soldier or sailor, or will go
alone with a prayer for the safety of
the son over there.
The Easter season is the anniver-
sary of our entrance into the war, and
this year practical determination to
achieve safety for the world has sup-
planted the frivolity of the past. Old
traditions of fashion and feast have
been revolutionized to join the ranks
in the campaign against waste.
Campus Life Affected
The past year of the war has
wrought a complete change in the
life of the campus. It has introduced
a more thoughtful and unselfish out-
look on life. Many of the girls of the
University are planning to send their
gift flowers to the hospitals of the
city. Others are painting baskets and
filling them with candy eggs for the
sick boys and girls in the big wards.
In the University hospital Easter
cards have been painted for every
tray by the women of the University.
In the afternoon the Mu Phi Epsilon
musical sorority has planned a pro-
gram of Easter music.
The traditional Easter egg will be
abolished this year. George A. Pres-
cott, the state food administrator, has
warned housewives to discourage the
coloring of eggs for the amusement
of children. He says that the dye used
-to color eggs renders them unfit for
food. The food administrator also
warns the public to curb an excessive
consumption of eggs today.
Dyes German Products
The dyes that have been a promin-
ent factor in the decoration of the
traditional Easter food have almost
vanished from the market, as the dyes
were a German product.
Forty Ann Arbor young men will
enter the service of the U. S. army to-
morrow, entraining for Camp-Custer.
The citizens are preparing to cele-
brate their departure with patriotic
activities.
LARGE AUDIENCE AT
JUNIOR GIRLS' PLAY

Twenty students, who passed the
physical examinations last week for
the United States naval reserves, have
been accepted. The men will be en-
listed and report for duty in Detroit
at 10 o'clock tomorroxy morning.
The students will be placed imme-
diately on patrol boats operating in
the Detroit river, Livingston channel,
and the St. Clair Flats. The men have
received no promises of immediate ad-
vancement or transfer. They will be
enlisted as second class seamen and
advancement.will depend entirely on
the degree of proficiency shown.
This is the second year that the pa-
trol has been in operation. A large
number of seamen, who were connect-
ed with the patrol last year, have al-
ready received their -commissions as
ensigns.
In case one or more of the 20 stu-
dents chosen for this branch of the
service fails to report tomorrow
morning in Detroit, the position or
positions will be filled from the list of
25 students also passing the examina-
tions.
The following men, who will report
for enlistment tomorrow, are request-
ed to call Charles F. Lambert, ex-'19,
at phone 131 before 3 o'clock this
afternoon:
E. H. Lyon, '19, L. Schoenfeldt, '20,
H. P. Dodge, '20E, Howard Weeks, '21,
R. C. Dunkelberg, '21E, L. B. Larson,
'17, 0. Antonio, '20, G. M. Robertson,
'21, C. S. Paterson, '20, F. G. McDuffie,.
'19, J. E. Foley, '20E, H. Keidanz, '18E,
C. Neumann, '18L, T. M. Bigelow, '21,
F. M. Brooch, '21, Fritz Henkel, '21,
P. J. Power, '20, J. J. Gummings, '21E,
G. W. Windiate, '20, and Harold Smith,
'19.
U. OF M. GIRLS URGED
TO AID STATE WORK

GERMANS BRING HEAVY GUNS
TO REST WEARIED INFANTRY
Troops Feel that Battle Will Go on
Long Time, Repeating Verdun
and Somme Affairs
(By Associated Press)
With the American army in France,
March 30.-"I am delighted at General
Pershing's prompt and effective ac-
tion in placing all the Amrican troops
and facilities at the disposal of the
Allies in the present situation," said
Secretary of War Baker, in a statement
given out at headquarters today.
"It will undoubtedly meet with
hearty approval in the United States,
where the people desire their expedi-
tionary forces to be of the utmost ser-
vice in the common cause. I have vis-
ited all the American troops in France,
some of them recently, and I have had
an opportunity to observe the enthus-
iasm with which the officers and men-
received the announcement that they
would be used in the present conflict.
One regiment to which the announce-
ment was made spontaneously broke
into cheers."
Troops Expect Long Struggle
The prevalent impression tonight
among the troops fighting along thi
front is that this battle will develop
into a long struggle similar to those
at Verdun, and the first battle of thi
Somme.
The Germans are making strenuous
efforts to bring heavy artillery forward
to support their infantry, which has
borne the brunt of the engagement
thus far. It is considered proba
that they will make another formid-
able rush with all their available re-
serves, but the allied commanders
view the future with unbounded con-
fidence. They regard the situation
as generally satisfactory and they be-
lieve that the only change will be for
the better.
Germans in Dangerous Pocket
The Teuton forces now occupy a sort
of pocket in the Franco-British lines.
which leaves them open to flank at-
tacks. It is believed by ally strateg-
ists that it is for this reason that the
Germans are laboring so steadfastly
to spread over the French lines. {
UNIVERSITY, RAILROAD,7AND
TOWN CLOCKS HAVE SAME TIME
The confusion resulting from the,
use of two or more time standards will;
be rectified today, when University,
railroad, and town clocks-will be made
to agree. The universal time will bei
called central standard time, and will
be the same as the present easterni
time adopted by the Univeristy.
Washington, March 30.-Turn the
hands of your clocks and watches for-
ward one hour, and add on one hour
of daylight to the nation's efforts to
win the war. Everybody's doing it
and if you fail, you will be late for
church Sunday morning, and just anf
hour late for work Monday morning,f
and just one hour behind everybodyf
and everything for the next six1
months.1

Egg. Sales Lower
eca"use of Price
The Easter bunny is not working
very hard this year, according to local
grocers. The prevailing high price of
eggs, 40 cents a dozen, the price of
dyes, and war time economy has put
a damper on that seasonable delight,
the vari-colored, hard-boiled and
tasty Easter egg. Less were sold this
year than ever before.
Confectioners announce a similar
falling off in the sale of the candy
Easter eggs which retail at a higher
price than formerly due to the sugar
scarcity.
ENGINE COURSE CONTRACT NOT
YET OFFICIALLY ACCEPTED
Although 200 men were expected to
be sent here April 1 by the war de-
partment to receive training as me-
chanics in the army, no official ac-
ceptance of the contract recently
signed by the University has been re-
ceived.
According to the terms of the con-
tract, ten days' notice was to be given
by thegovernment in case men were
to be trained here,
Plans submitted by the University
provided that the men would board at
the Union, and live in the north side
of the campus in three or four houses
owned by the University. Men would
be sent in groups of 200 each, to take
courses of six weeks.
ENTERTINMENT POWES
CLIM FOR"~MISS HOBBS"
COMEDY CLUB PLAY HAD LONG
PROFESSIONAL RUN IN
NEW YORK
To achieve great professional suc-
cess a comedy must posses the cer-
tain cleverness of lines and origin-'
ality of situations that appeal to pop-
ular taste, and it was because, "Miss
Hobbs," possesses this cleverness and
originality that it was selected for.
presentation at the Majestic theater,'
April 19, according to Comedy club
officials.
Annie Russell, who appeared here{
this season in, "The Thirteenth Chair,"
created the part in New York It the
Lyceum theater,. where it immediate-
ly achieved great popularity and had
an extended run. It is the work off
Jerome K. Jerome.
Not since two years ago, when the
Comedy club made its last presenta-
tion, has a play of the kind been pre-
sented to the campus. It is meant
only to entertain. There are no pass-r
ages which would lead anyone to sup-l
pose that Mr. Jerome has sought to:
elevate the drama, but there are many'
that will amse an audience highly,
say those connected with the pro-i
duction.
Rehearsals have been going on for.
the past three weeks, under directionl
of Mr. Warren H. Townsend, instruct-
or in oratory, who had five years pro-
fessional training.
Allied Airplanes - Attack Luxemburg>
Amsterdam, March 30. - Advices
from Berlin say that on Thursday aft-E
ernoon allied airplaines attacked thef
town of Luxemburg. Ten persons have
been reported killed and considerables
property damaged.

WILL BE FORCED TO TURN
GERMANY IF NEGLECTED
BY ALLIES

FRENCH TROOPS YIELD SLIGHTLY
WHEN GMAN PILERVER BEGINS
S POUNDING MONDIlRFRONT ANEW

TO

"We must not desert Russia at this
time but must help to get her on hex
feet again, or she will be forced to
turn to Germany for aid," said Prof. S.
N. Harper 'in his lecture last night in
Sarah Caswell Angell hall, under the
auspices of the Russki Kruzhok.
"Bolshevikism gained acceptance
and secured control in Russia by
'promising to relieve the economic sit-
nation which was continually growing
worse under Kerensky, who was in-
capable of handling the required re-
organization," he continued. "It was
a stab in the dark by the Russian
people for something better, but it has
failed in everything.
"Germany looked for little resist-
ance in Russia at the start of the
war, as she expected dissension among
the people, but Russia should be
'praised for the large military con-
tributions she has made in' the
first years of the war, in spite of the
fact that her army was poorly equip-
ped."
Professor Harper believes that the
men who started the revolution which
overthrew the old order, did so mere-
ly to prevent the government from
making a premature peace.
"The provisional council of work-
men, soldiers and peasants which met
to determine the policies of the new
order was the first to express them-
selves as in favor of 'no annexations
and no indemnities'"he pointed out.
"The banners which they carried in
'their parades bore the inscription 'we
must win the war.' It was only the
Bolshevikists who were the small min-
ority who did not favor the prosecu-
tion of the war.
"The Bolsheviki are unscrupulous
in their efforts to create class antag-
onism, but even yet they represent a
minority of the Russian people. I be-
lieve that order; will eventually come
out of the chaos, as the working men
are developing a spirit of patriotism,
which had little cause for existence
under the oppression of the old re-
gime."
He told of several of his personal
experiences during his last visit to
Russia which showed the unreasoning
views of the Bolsheviki. In his final
statements he set forth his belief that
Germany's recent gains would be of
little advantage to her.
FRESHMAN GLEE CLUB SINGS
AT MIXER THIS AFTERNOON
Michigan's 1921 Freshman Glee club
will make its second appearance this
afternoon,, at the mixer to be held
from 3 to 5 o'clock at the Union. The
organization has about 30 musicians
and the Union expects to be able to
give a good entertainment to those
who' attend.
With the coming of warm weather,
the Union plans to hold its weekly
sings in the open, probably at some
place such as the campus band stand.
the mixer today is to be the last one
held indoors.
Varsity Glee Club to Rehearse
One of the regular rehearsals of the
Varsity Glee Club will be held in the
School of Music, Monday evening at 7
o'clock. Members of the glee club
have not been turning out for these
rehearsals as consistently as wished.

'* * * * * * * * * * * * *
* Reserve Corps Reports Are Due *
* Monthly reports for members of *
*the Engineers' reserve corps for *
* the month of March will be mail- *
* ed to Washington tomorrow at *
* noon. Reports must be turned in *
* to Secretary Hopkins' office be- *
* fore that time. Students failing *
* to turn in reports within the spec- *
ified time may become subject to *
* draft. *
RUSSIA NEEDS, OUR AID
TO GET ON FEET-HPER

TEUTONS SWING TO SOUTH WHEN
CI(ECED WITH IhEAVY LOSS
ON SOMME LINE
TAKE VILLAGES IN -
FIVE MILE BREACH
Wings of (rown Prince's Army Spit;
May Pay Dear for Drive on
Amiens From South
On the Battle Front, March 30. -
French troops now are meeting the
shock of the German attack on a 25-
mile front in what may develop to be
the most important battle fought'since
the beginning of the offensive some
days ago.
Checked at Arras in the attempt to
capture that city from the British and
to disorganize the northern British
line, and finding themselves able to
advance only step by step 'at a great
loss of lives in their attack along the
Somme front toward Amiens, the Ger-
mans on Friday night turned south-
ward and hurled heavy masses of
troops upon the French in the Mont-
;didier salient.
French Line Holding
It is here, from Moreuil, 10 miles
northwest of Montdidier, in a curving
line around the latter place and east-
ward to Lassigney, nearly 15 miles
away that the battle was raging, ac-
cording to the latest accounts. Val-
iant assaults were delivered upon the
French line which developed a pow-
erful resistance strengthened by the
arrival of fresh reserves.
Enemy Advances Five Miles
The initial force of the impact, how-
ever, was sufficient to drive the French
back a short distance at and near the
points of the salient. Pushing west-
ward from the branch of' the river
Avre, which runs in a northwesterly
direction from Montdidier, the enemy
forced his way into several villages
within a stretch of about five miles
along the front. The advance as
shown by the location of the villages
announced as captured, reached a'
maximum of about three miles in this
sector. South of Montdidier the wedge
was driven in about two miles. Fight-
ing at this point was still in progress
late Saturday in the midst of a heavy
rainfall.
German Wings Not Apace
The German aim here is apparently
to drive westward from Montdidier in
a further attempt to cut in on Amiens
from the south. The German line here
is considerably extended, the northern
wing of the advance having by no.
means kept pace with -the southern.
It is probable that the energy of the
crown prince who commands this
group may be leading him too far.
If the attack is intended to open a
southward path for the Germans it
seems to be exerted too far to the
west on the southerly line to win a
way to the river Oise where the river
curves southwest from Noyon and
flows toward Paris. A.possibility how-
ever, is that the Germans are attempt-
ing to stave off an allied counter at-
tack, attacking themselves rather than
stand still and be attacked on this
most exposed front.
Four Villages Captured
London, March 30.-The German
forces made their way into the vil-
lage of Demium this morning, but were
driven back by our troops, according
to an official statement tonight. The
statement also reports strong enemy
attacks on the line a short distance
south of Arras.
The Germans have captured the vil-
lages of Aubervillers, St. Georges,' Le
Monchel and Ayencourt in the Mont-
didier region.

Alumnae, faculty women, and un-
dergraduates packed Sarah Caswell
Angell hall yesterday afternoon to wit-
ness the second performance of the
Junior Girls' play.
The action hinges on the love affair
between Jerry and Betty, two college
students. Betty's uncle, who is a col-
lege professor, disapproves of his
niece's choice of a lover. The young
man is discovered at the professor's
home after he has been forbidden the
premises, the professor promises to
look with favor on his suit if Jerry
will consent to an experiment in the
interest of science, which involves be-
ing blown to Mars along with Profes-
sor Pickering. Jerry consents. Among
other wonderful things that happen
to them on their Martian visit, is an
exchange of personalities, which caus-
es Jerry to act like the professor, and
the professor to act like Jerry. In
the condition they return to earth. The
result is productive of general con-
sternation and misunderstanding for
the principals, but much merriment for
the audience. The Martian responsi-
ble for the hyponotic tangle finally
comes to earth and undoes his doings
and the lovers win.
The play, called "Meddling with
Mars," was written for the junidr
girls by Jenny Jacobs, and produced
r~ under the direction of Prof. John R.

Important assistance to the cause of
the state registration of women may
be rendered by University women dur-
ing the spring vacation, says the Rev.
Caroline Bartlett Crane, chairman of
the Michigan division, Women's com-
mittee, council of national defense.
Although actual registration will not
take place until April 27, instead of
April 6, as planned, instruction in the
use of the cards may be given by
those who had intended to help reg-
ister.
Women who are willing to assist in
this way are asked to sign with Miss
Louise Potter in the office of the dean
of women. A list of all the county
and local chairmen in the state will
soon be posted. Women will be asked
to get in touch with the nearest chair-
man and help organize the community
for the registration. Literature and
directions will be sent to women so
engaged, by Mrs. Crane, it they will
send their home address before leav-
ing Ann Arbor.
Curate Leaves to Go in Service -
The Rev. Cyril Harris, curate of
the St. Andrew's Episcopal church,
has received orders to report to Camp
Meade, Maryland, and will leave 'Ann
Arbor for that camp next Wednes-
day.

PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH
Huron and Division
EASTER SERVICE

10:30
A.M.

Address by
LEONARD BARRETT

10.30
A.M.

Wesleyan Guild Lecture
GEORGE E. MAcILWAIN
(Of Boston)
WAR AND LABOR

d
P
a
f
O
aI

Laon Cathedral Endangered
Berlin, March 30.-An official state-
ment issued today says that the Ger-
mans have made progress in their at-
tack between the Somme and the Oise.
The town of Ayette has been cleared
of enemy forces.
The Laon cathedral, which has been
considerably damaged by the continu-
ous bombardment is threatened with
destruction from the fire of the French
guns.

of giving a public per-
e decided this week.

TO3T Methodist Church

TONIGHT

ii

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