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March 29, 1918 - Image 1

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Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1918-03-29

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irn'

11

IDAY

JN ARBOR, MICHIGAN, FRIDAY, MARCH 29, 1918.

Jtfareh Says Drive Not Alarming

HAIG REPORTS TE
AFTER ALL DAY
AND SOUTH BA!

Washington~, March 2.-In a statement tonight Major General
March, acting chief of staff, assured the American people there is no
cause for alarm in the advances made by the Germans in the great
battle now raging in Picardy, and expressed complete confidence in
the triumph of the Allied arms.
"Whatever may be the present ground held by the Germans;
whatever sacrifice of men the situation may entail," he said "the Al-
lies will see it through and will win."
Late tonight the general still was without any word from Gen,
Pershing concerning the American troops participating In the battle.

*

* * * * * * * * * * *

* Applications for enlistment in
* the army stores course are again
* being considered, following a rul-
* ing received yesterday from the
* government. The ordnance corps
* was closed to volunteers several'
* weeks ago.
* Men who applied for the course
* scheduled to start April 13 are
* still eligible, and their applica-
* tions are being taken in turn, not-'
* withstanding notices sent out sev-
* eral days ago to the effect that'
* they could not be admitted.
*
* * * * * * * *,.* * * *
Roosevelt Flays
Nismanagemeni

*
*
*
*
*
*
*

A

HUN '
'1

*
* I
* i

ex-f
al-
cess
has
the

WIRT OUTLINES GARY1
CITY SCHOOL SYSTEM
SAYS WELFARE AGENCIES SHOULD
MAKE CITY IDEAL FOR
CHILDREN
That the city is an ideal place for
us to lead our lives and can be made
the best place for children if all
child wefare agencies make use of
the advantages of concentrated popu-
lation, was the theme on which Mr.
Willian Wirt, superintendent and
founder of the Gary city school sys-

1SCOL ATR'CLUB
ENDS SESSION TONIGHT
ANNUAL CONVENTION CLOSES
WITH LECTURE ON
KATMAI
The fifty-third session of the Michi-
gan Schoolmasters' club will close
with a lecture by Prof. Robert F.
Briggs, of Ohio State University, on
"Katmai and the Ten Thousand
Smokes," to be given at 8 o'clo'ck at
the Hill auditorium. Professor Briggs
has 'made four trips to the Katmai

ttle

I fidelity to
are marking
tatues which
he main en-
building. By
instruments,
is doing the
e his work

Portland, Me., March 28.-T"iere is
but one way to get a righteous and
lasting peace and that is to beat Ger-
many to her knees, Colonel Theodore
Roosevelt declared here today in a
"keynote address" which he delivered
before the Maine republican state
convention. Colonel Roosevelt lauded
as "Whole-hearted" support which- he
declared the renublican members of

tem, lectured last night in Hill audi- regions.

a
will

torium.
His talk, in which he outlined the
system and showed its practical value,
was accompanied by several reels of
motion pictures showing the children
of the Gary schools at study, work,
and play.
Play Ground Work Important
"The play ground and shop work of
our schools is just as much part of
our curriculum as is the study of the
'three R's'," said Mr. Wirt, "but we

six

d the
Ann
what-
con-

itton have
lucing no-
sculptured
SArchbish-
is a pro-

TY MEN
ANE MOTORS
i of the engin-
it completed a
nment on the

E.

do not believe in taking time from
their regular studies to put on the
special subjects. Instead we have ex-
tended the time of the school day from
five hours to seven. This additional
time they spend in school keeps them
from the strdet and alley where they
are liable to develop bad habits.
Pictures Shown
Pictures were shown of scholars
working in these shops and also :n
the physical laboratories. "Children
have a natural desire to experiment
and if this is developed they will not
lose it as they grow older," explained
Mr. Wirt. "Of course young children
cannot be trustedl to work alone with
chemicals but older students who have
nearly completed courses in chemis-
try help and direct them in perform-
ing the experiments.'
Soph Engineers Choose Committee
Four sophomore engineers were
chosen to represent their class on the
soph prom committee at a meeting of
the sophomore engineering class yes-
terday morning in the Engineering
building. They are: Howard N. Col-
lins, G. R. Anderson, George C. Dunn,
L. W. Morehouse.
The class voted to publish a cata-
log containing the names and home
addresses of all members to serve as
a souvenir, and for reference after

Speakers Announced
Among the speakers who will ad-
dress the meetings today are Prof. F.
S. Breed of Chicago university, Prof.
Whipple of the University of Illinois
and Mr. William E. Hall, national di-
rector of the boys' working reserve,
Washington, D. C.
A business meeting will be held at
9 o'clock this morning and will meet
in general session at 9:30. Prof. F. S.
Breed, Prof. Whipple and Mr. W. E.
Hall will speak.
Will Have 12 Sections
The afternoon session will be div-
ided up into 12 sections. The classi-
cal conference will meet in Alumni
Memorial hall, the history conference
in room C-3 of the high school, the
modern language conference in room
203, University hall, the English con-
ference in the high school auditorium,
the physics conference in the physical
laboratory, the mathematical confer-
ence in the lecture room of Tappan
hall, the biological conference in room
207 Natural Science building, the art
conference in room A, Alumni build-
ing, the geography and physiography
conference in room 217-G Natural

said the former president, in his ar-
raignment of "some of the most im- Th
portant divisions of the government" tinu'
which he said were "almost chemically the
pure of efficient organization.". . who
In discussing post-bellum readjust- to e
-ments which he declared have already of th
been shown essential to the continued attac
well-being of the nation, the speaker of
said "we cannot afford to tolerate Mesn
flint-lock methods of warfare in time whic
of war or flint-lock methods of the solid
government for meeting the problems still
of industry in time of peace. We need
new weapons, but we need the old
spirit back of the new weapons. The Ma
simple governmental processes which shap
sufficed in the days of Washington and man

Congress had,

en to the
in. He d

he said, had been such as to
good patriots grave concern i
the necessity for pursuing a
"permanent preparedness"a
war is won.
"War is won by hrnins

dly.
ho

arch 2F
e of a g

Science building, and

the manual

tie motor.
from the engineering
'at the Packard plant
notor work, according

training conference in room C-1 high
school.
Announce Appointments of Teachers-
Recent appointments of women to
teaching positions in Michigan are an-
nounced by the teachers' appointment
bureau as follows:
Lavanche Rieger, Hart, Latin and
French; Elizabeth Patchin, Munising,
French and history; Ruth Hebble-

EXAMSI

white, Birmingham, history;I
Townsend, Wayne, subject not

Martha.
yet as-

id approach-

which

signed; Nellie Belles, Ithaca, English;
Portia Walker, Hancock, English and
science; Beryl McClelland, Alma,
mathematics.

even in the days of Lincoln are as
utterly inadequate today in peacetas
the' flint-lock of Bunker Hill and the
smooth-bore muskets of Bull Run
would be in war."
Lands Republicans
"Republicans in Congress since the
entry of the United States into the
war have sought to serve their party
only by making it serve America,"
Colonel Roosevelt said in his introduc-
tory remarks. - "Not in all our history
has any political party, when in op-
pdsition, shown as fine, as whole-
hearted and as completely disinterest-
ed patriotism as has been shown by
the republican party, especially by its
representatives in the 'Senate and Con-
gress of the United States during the
year and two months now closing.
"This is the people's war. It is not
the President's war. It is not Con-
gress' war. tI is the duty of the re-
publican party to stand like a rock
against inefficiency, incompetence,
hesitation and delay "no less than
against lukewarmness in serving the
common cause of ourselves and our
allies. To support a public servant
who does wrong is as profoundly un-
patriotic as to oppose a public servant
who does right."

to a halt exce
salient drive:
entente allies
the Teutonic
south, in an a
Landricourt c
line" to Mont
behind the A
stood in 1916.
French
Savage figb
the French pa
man attempts
treme tip of
the French p
less. They h
the point of t

This afternoon at four o'clock a special service will
be held in the Congregational Church. A quartet, under direc-

quan- I

tion of Earl V. Moore, will render appropriate music.

The

address will be delivered by Lloyd C. Douglas on the theme
"A Dry-eyed View of Golgotha."
-- .I

ANNUAL

s

li

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