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March 26, 1918 - Image 6

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1918-03-26

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

!

Il

WHAT'S GOING ON
TODAY

is it I Iw 1 lw 51
BY NUNS ON Pi

II

t Shop.

(Continued from Page One) j
that the original French lines now
virtually outflanked the advancing
Germans along the Oise river.
The fall of Bapaume in the early
hours of Monday was a blow to the
British, but it was the result of a de-
termination to fall back slowly all
along the line that is being attacked.
Berlin Claims 45,000 Prisoners
Where the German wedge is still
moving, its progress is not alarmingly
rapid as it was in the first rush of the
Teutonic hordes. The yielding line
it is asserted has absorbed the impetus
of the shock and has weathered the
storm remarkably well. Berlin claims
that 45,000 prisoners have been taken.
These were probably units which were
left to hold the easier defended points,
while the main portion of Field Marsh--
all Haig's army fell back. The Brit-
ish losses have been heavy, but it
has been officially announced, con-
sidering the magnitude of the strug-
gle, they are not undue. On the other
hand, the Germans have suffered ter-
hibly, even Berlin admitting the Teu-
tonic casualties before Peronne "were
comparatively heavy."
Paris Shelled Again

9 o'clock-Session of the institute
for superintendents, principals, and
supervisors in room B, Law building.
10 o'clock-Prof. J. G. Winter lec-
tures in Alumni Memorial hall on
"Crete and Its Ruins."
11 o'clock-Prof. G. J. Laing lectures
in Alumni Memorial hall on "The In-
digenous Gods of Italy."
12:35 o'clock-Lenten services at 444
South State street.
2 o'clock-Sessions of the institute
for superintendents, principals, and
supervisors in room B, Law building.
2 o'clock-Joint session of the class-
ical and modern language conferences
in Alumni Memorial hall.
4:15 o'clock-Prof. J. G. Laing lec-
tures in Alumni Memorial hall on "The
Graeco-Italian Divinities."
4 o'clock--Botanical Journal club
meets in room 173, Natural Science
building.
7 o'clock-Jewish Student society
meets in room 204, University hall.
7 o'clock-Adelphi debating society
meets in Adelphi room, University
hall.
7:30 o'clock-Student council meets
at the Michigan Union.

March 31st

Right now the World is
short of wool, and the mark-
ets are flooded with substi-
tutes. But-these substi-
tutes do not serve as does all

i

Easter

wool.

R

There is no reason why you
have to depend upon inferior
substitutes-you can still

M-

of Michigan

have All.

Wool clothes,

in

S

i

of them.

Fashions

every

Day
S

E AM

Nourishing

MI

nd Supplies
he College Spirit"
&Co.
Detroit

Paris has again been bombarded byI
the mysterious German cannon whichf
is said to have been located in the
forest of .-St. Gobain. .
American artillerymen have again
deluged German positions in the vic-
inity of Toul with high explosive
shells, and have driven the Germans
back from the advanced trenches.
GERMANS WILL NOT BE ABLE
TO BREAK LINES, SAYS WOOD
Washington, March 25.-Allied mil~I
itary experts are unanimous in their'
confidence that the German offensive
will fail, and that the enemy will not
be able to break through the lines,
Major General Wood, who has just re-$
turned from the European battle front,
today told the senate military com-
mittee and many 'other senators who
listened in an executive session -to a ]
statement from the general.
Praising the condition and work of
General Pershing's expeditionary
force, General Wood recommended
that an American army of 2,000,000
men be maintained abroad as soon as
possible and that another 2,000,000
be trained.
CAMP CUSTER NURSES RECEIVE
LESSONS IN ART OF BOXING
Battle Creek, Mich., March 25.-All
of the nurses who are serving in the
base hospital at Camp Custer canton-
ment are to receive boxing lessons.
The nurses, nearly 100 of them, who
expect soon to go to France, asked
that they be taught in the art of self-
defense. Stories of German atrocit-
ies inflicted upon Red Cross nurses
and other women and girls, made the
Camp Custer nurses determined to
learn to fight.
Charlie White, division boxing in-
structor, has been ordered to organ-
ize boxing classes for these women.
So far as known, Custer is the first
cantonment in the United States to
take such action.
"Who knows when we will have to
use our fists to protect ourselves,"
said one of the nurses. "A weapon of
defense can be made as powerful in
the hands of a woman, as in the hands
of a man-particularly when the wo-
man is fighting for her life, or even
more."
Turks Burn Carmelite Library
London, March 25.-News has been
received from Bagdad that the fa-
mous Oriental library collected there
by the Carmelite Fathers, has been
burned by the Turks. The library
consisted of more than 20,000 volumes
on subjects. connected with Mesopo-
tamia, consisting in the main of
French and English, but also some
Italian and German works and in-
cluding some very rare books.
The most important part of the col-,
lection was the 2,753 Arabic manu-

- TOMORROW
9 o'clock-Session of the institute
for superintendents, principals, and
supervisors in room B, Law building.
10 o'clock-Prof J. G. Winter lec-
tures lit Alumni Memorial hall on
"Troy, Tiryns, and Mycenae."
11 o'clock-Prof. -G. J. Laing lec-
tures in Alumni Memorial hall on
"The Worship of the Emperors."
12:35 o'clock-Lenten services at 444
South State street.
2 o'clock-Session of the institute
for superintendents, principals, and
supervisors in room B, Law building.
4 o'clock-Prof. G. J. Laing lec-
tures in Alumni Memorial hall on "The
Oriental Cults."
5 o'clock-I1 Circulo Dante meets in
room 204, University hall.
8 o'clock-Classical club play in Un-
iversity hall.
U-NOTICES
The All-fresh {flee club will re-
hearse at 7 o'clock tonight in room
204, School of Music.
Prof. T. E. Bankin will not meet his
class in education (40) today, nor his
classes in rhetoric (4) and (20) on
Wednesday.
Reserved seats for "Phormlo" will
be on sale from 8 to 5 o'clock today
and tomorrow in University hall,

J.Karl Malcolm
604 E. Liberty Malcolm Block

Vacation April 5th

li ll lilliplill 111 11 10 0 -11

Minimum Prices.

a

Hand-Tailored to your indi-
vidual measure-for that is
teh only kind WE tailor.
Hand-Tailored Clothes rep-
resent Maximum Values at

OAKLAND
"The Sensible Six"
The automobile which
combines grace of design
with strength and dura-
bility at a fair price.

1'

WAR SAVINGS S IP
ISSUED I+Y THE'
UNITED STAE

HIGH SCHOOLS MEET HERE
STATE CHAMPIONSHIP

IN
TILT

COONTRIBUTIONS TO BELGIAN
RELIEF SWAMP COM1FJITTEE
Although 13 bales of clothing have
,been taken. out of the mass of gar-
,ments contributed toward the cause
r of the Belgians, the committee seems
to have made no impression upon the
niles gathered at the- Huron street

Central high school of Detroit will
meet Kalamazoo high in a basketball
tilt at Waterman gymnasium to decide
the state championship title. Each
team has won one game of the other
and received permission from the ath-
letic association to settle the fight on
a neutral floor.
Kalamazoo expects to bring two
special cars with rooters to witness
the game, and Central is also expect-
ed to bring a large crowd of fans with
her.
There is opportunity in Daily wat
ads.-Adv.

A. C. MARQUARDT
GARAGE

EXPERT REPAIRING SERVICE
FOR ALL MAK1ES OF CARS

311l Maynard St.

Phone 192?

headquarters.
A large quantity of garments were
disinfected Sunday evening and more
of them will be fumigated'this eve-
ning. It is thought by the committee
in charge that it will be possible to
get definite information today regard-
ing the numbers and kinds of gar-'
ments that have been collected during
the past five day campaign.
People still can take contributions
to the downtown headquarters this
afternoon. This is the only place
where garments will be received be-
cause collections otherwise have been
abandoned.

U -- U

II

<Cil

C C ,umvrnez.- ...

,m _

,11

roL -

Hillsdale Club to Hold Banquet
The Hillsdale college club will hold
a banquet at, G o'clock Friday night at
the Arcade cafeteria. All Hillsdale
college alumni are urged to come and
are requested to notify Frank Taber,
grad., before Thursday noon.

Specializing in Hats
from

cripts bought in the course of the
J last century; most of them had not
been printed and no other copy ex-
listed.

Prices

$3.00 to $7.00

exchange toward New
them in our Rental De-
s than their real value,
. have it put in order for

6,000 Workers Strike Near Yokohama
Tokio, March 25.-Six thousand
workmen in the employ of the Uraga
Dock Co., near Yokohama, went out
on a strike today for increased wages.
A number of persons were injured.

.

LOUISE HIP

in Japan
r its quie

has always been
docility and sub-

''

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