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March 23, 1918 - Image 4

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1918-03-23

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

I

MILITARY NEWS

-1.

.,

lUll i IIUIIIUIlnL
IN. EXILE AWAIT PEACE

,Mar,,31

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ild be

more appropriate

as an

i a box of Yellow and Blue Mich-

1 The military authorities requested
the cadets yesterday afternoon to at-
tend the lecture to be given by Mr.
Albert Depew at 8 o'clock tonight in
Hill auditorium.
Four men owning motorcycles are
wanted in the Headquarters com-
,pay-, according to a statement issued
Slast night by the military authorities.
The men, who volunteer their ser-
vices for field service, will act as
aides for the commanders in working
out all field problems. The time re-
quired for the execution of their du-
ties will be the same as the regular
drill hours.

a few fancy Easter baskets filled
s.

REFUGEES FROM ALSACE - LOR-
RAINE ANXIOUS TO RETURN
TO FORMER -HONES
French Front, March 22.-Germany
just now maintains almost absolute
silence in regard to Alsace and Lor-
raine, but the many thousands of
refugees who have waited patiently
in France and her colonies since 1871,
for the time when they shall be
able to return to their former homes,
continue eagerly to discuss what they
consider their certain redemption.
Some idea of how large is the num-
ber of these exiles may be gathered
from the fact that 160,000 residents
of Alsace and Lorraine accepted the,
option of leaving their homes and tak-
i g up their residence in France after
those provinces passed under German
rule by the treaty of Frankfort on
May 10, 1871. The Prussian author-
ities annulled 100,000 of those op-
tions because the people failed to
leave within the time specified in the
treaty.
Great Exodus
The annullment of the options did
not prevent the Alsatians and Lor-
rainians from leaving when they had
made arrangements for doing so.
From 1875 to 1880, 35,000 of them

k11HIIM
CLEANED AND REBLOCKED
with a new band
LOOKS LIKE NEW
Saves $2.00 or $3.00
FACTORY HAT STORE
617 Packard St., next to the Delta
Telephone 1792
ARCADE
Shows Rt 3. 7 and 8:30 Eastern Time
15c Unless Otherwise :specified.
Sat 23-Virginia Pearson in "Stolen
Honor" andChristie Comedy, "Bet-
ty's Big Idea."
Mon-25-Harold Lockwood in "Broad-
way Bill," and Drew Comedy, "Help
WYanted"
Tues-Wed-26-27-Theda Bara in "Cam-
ille" and (Tues) Pathe News, (Wed)
Mutt & Jeff Cartoon, "His Favorite
Nephew." 2oc.
RAE
'THEATR E
TODAY

mfield s

General Orders No. 5
1. A practice march will be sched-
uled Saturday, Mareh 23, 1918. Mem-
bers of the R. O. T. C. who desire to
participate in this march will fall in
with their companies on North Uni-
versity avenue in front of Barbour
gymnasium, at 1:15 o'clock, p. m.
The march will be conducted, as
far as possible, by companies as per-
manently organized. Companies,
whose members do not report in suf-
ficient numbers, will be combined into
provisional companies; company com-
manders will be designated for the
march for these provisional compan-
les.

709 No.
University Ave.

s
p

I

* *.
*"
- "
at
*

BRITISH FARJMERS COMPELLED
TO CULTIVATE LAND HEAVILY
London, March 22. - The British
food production department is taking
drastic steps to see that the country

*

*
*
*
in "Cle- *
*
*
scher in *
Y." Also *
*

does not suffer from the neglect and
kindifference of unpatriotic farmers.
Farms which remain under-cultivated
in spite of pressure from the coun-
ty agricultural committees are being
taken over and cultivated by the com-'
mittees, usually with war-prisoner
labor. The central committee reports!
that "most farmers are doing their
best, but there are some bad excep-
tions."
At Buckingham, the local court, in

,
t

,ply to a request from the board of
griculture, fined a negligent farmer
00 and ordered him to vacate his
,rm in 14 days. On the same day,
Le Irish department of agriculture
)nfiscated 514 acres of land from
ord Ashton.
There are opportunities for youak
eit year.

spring Fever Gets
Another Victim
.He had a great ambition; he was
going to be a second McLaughlin or
Murray, and he started out yesterday!
to get all the possible practice before
the Spring Tennis Tournament. He
carefully drew on his rubbers over
his new buckskin shoes and waded
forth. He looked like a regular one,
a loyal yellow and blue striped shirt,
white flannel trou and an A. S. B. tie,
around his brow a silken kerchief. He
found the game, much to his disap-
pointment, a wilting affair. Slowly
his garnients became slithery, they
clung to his warm hide. The stripes
ran from his A. S. B. tie and made
cunning little varied colored dots
across his heaving chest. The mean
old ball hit his knee and put there
an ugly splosh of mud. Panting,
sighing, he swore "I will never play
this T hound game," anid it was even
so, for presently he melted entirely
and seeped down through the clay
courts. I died of shock and buried
myself beneath the north left hand4
court; would all others who tell such
lies do otherwise.
WOMEN URGED TO REGISTER
THIS MORNING AT GYMNASIUM
Yesterday's work in registration of
women has brought the total number
up to 400, according to figures taken
at the close of yesterday afternoon.
Owing to the party given in Barbour
gymnasium this afternoon, registra-
tion will be held only in the morning
hours, from 9 to 12 o'clock. This is
the last .chance to register at the,
gymnasium.
Next week a house to house can-,
vass, the exact nature of which has
not yet been determined, will be made
to complete the registration. Al-
though not compulsory, everyone is
requested to register. To facilitate
the work next week everyone who has
not yet registered is urged to do so
this morning at the gymnasium.

ured Now

2. Cadets, to whom uniforms have
been issued, will wear the prescribed
uniform. The following changes in the
uniform are authorized for this march.
In lieu of the cap, campaign hats,
without hatcords, may be worn. Olive
drab shirts may be substituted for
the blouse. Black neckties, only, may
be worn.
3. This practice march is voluntary
exercise. Cadets who take part will
be given one hour credit for each
hour of the march. A distance of
about 10 miles will be covered ^dur-
ing four hours of march..
BY ORDER OF LIEUT. MULLEN:
L. J. WILLIAMS,
1st Lt., P. S., retired, Adjutant
On account of the unsatisfactory
condition of the ground on the north
side of Ferry field, the cadets have
been ordered not to drill on this por-
tion of the field, stated the military
authorities last night. All the move-
ments must be executed on the south
,end.
More than 115 men are now enrolled
in the band. This includes field mu-
'sic, and members of the R. 0. -T. C.
and Varsity bands. The men drill
every Wednesday evening in Water-
man gymnasium. After the drill, a
short practice is held. It is probable
that the combined bands will partici-
pate in one or more R. 0. T. C. re-
views this spring.
Make up classes will be held from
9 to 11 o'clock this morning in Water-
man gymnasium.
MANY JEWISH STUDENTS WILL
ATTEND SERVICES IN DETROIT
A large number of Jewish students
are leaving for Detroit to attend the
annual student-day services to be
given tomorrow by the Temple Beth-
El. This year the exercises will be
held for both students and soldiers.
The Young' Peoples' society and the
Women's auxiliary of the temple are
in charge of the exercises. It is ex-
pected that more than 150 members of
the Jewish Students' congregation
will attend the services.
The complete program for the day
is: Divine services, 11 o'clock in the
morning; home hospitality, 1 o'clock
in the afternoon; Young Peoples' so-
ciety luncheon, 6 o'clock; entertain-
ment and dance, 8 o'clock.
PROF. BIL F.BRIGGS"OF OHIO
STATE WILL LECTURE HERE

crossed the frontier. These were fol- Continuous from 2 p. m.
lowed during the next five years by standard
another 60,000, while a further 37,000
left from 1885 to 1890. Still another Triangle Feature De Lux
34,000 fled from German rule in the
period between 1890 and 1895. MARGERY WILSON
French Towns Grow
In consequence of this constant im- The prettiest girl in fildmdom in
migration the towns on the French
side of the Vosges mountains have in- "Without Honor"
creased greatly in size. Epinal has
tripled in population since 1871; Bel- - Also -
fort has grown from a small town of WM. S. HART
5,000 in 1870 to 35,000 today; Raon- in a 2-part western play and
l'Etape, Val-et-Chatillon, Cirey, Thoan- comedy
les-Vosges, Nancy, Bar-le-Duc, Frouard
and Pagny have all received large in- COMING MONDAY
creases of inhabitants. - NAZIMOVA in "WAR BRIDES"
Industries Built 1p Not a stock exchange picture
All along the frontier, on French but a story of the war.
territory, these exiles have built up Prices the same.
industries which formerly flourished See it at THE RAE.
in Alsace and Lorraine. Their depart-
ure from these provinces caused much
disturbance, as may be gathered from
the fact that Metz has lost at least j iligI;II~gIg1gg1IIIIIIIgIlh i illl1I
one-third of its civil population, while = Thea ire
Bischwiller and Phalsbourg have fal- WVuert Th r
len off in similar proportion.
Emigrate to Algeria - Evenings-6 :3, 8:00, 9:30
Some of the rural populatior emi- P Prices:P-Maines7c;EJvenings 2o
grated as far off .as Algeria, where = We Pay the Tax
over 5,000 of them settled on allot- BOOKINGS FOR MARCH
ments, and remain there with their Sat-23-Margarite Fischer in "Miss Jac-
kie of the Army." Also Comedy and
descendants today, still speaking their I4s rCkeekly.
origial. ialet. I Sun-Mou1-24-zs - Marguerite Clark in
orig . "Bob's Matinee Idol." Also Son of
All these people are waiting for the C- Democracy, "His Mother."
.. 'rues-W~ed-26-27-All Star Cast in "Be-
outcome of the war so that they may ware of Stranger." In 8 Parts.
reutrn to the soil they love so well, I 'llhii-Fri-28-9 - Sessue Hayakawatin
- The Secret Game." Also Keystone
and where they are sure they will Comedy, "Court and Cabaret."
Sat-3o Olivec Tell in "Her Sister."
be joined .by those of their compatriots Also NVeekly ad Comedy.
who migrated to America in the hope .:

I

For your,

Spring and
Cer Clothes

fertjifl of Style
Quality assured

of being able some day to return to
find that German militarism has dis-
appeared.
Armory Dance Chaperones Announced
The party at the armory tonight will
pe chaperoned by Prof. and Mrs. W. D.
Moriarity, and Prof. and Mrs. W. A.
Paton. There will be dancing from 9
to 12 o'clock.
Eves. 50c to IANiI Pop, MatsWe6d
$2.50, Sat. Mat. 1 and Sat, "0c
50c to $2.00 bETROIT $2.00
New York Winter Garden Revue
PASSING SHOW OF 1917

OrpheumTheatre
Matinees-z:oo, 3:30
Evenings-6:30, 8:o, 9:30
" ~Phone-ri6o-J
Prices:
Mat. ioc; Eve. i c; Children Sc
w No Tax
BOOKINGS FOR MARCH
w. Sat-23-Douglas Fairbanks in "Down to
- Earth." (Ret.) Also Comedy.
Sun-Mon-24-z5-Winifred Allen, "From
C rwo to Six." Also Comedy, "Their
Undercover Capers."
-TUeS-26-.Roy Stewar in "Law's Out
Law." (Ret.) Also Serial, "The
a Eagle's Eye." No. 3.
-Wed-27-Alyn Ruebens in "Gown of
Destiny." (Ret.) Also Serial, "The
Eagle's Eye." No. 3.
. lhr-Fri-25-29-Belle Bennett in "A
Soul i nTrust." In 7 Parts.

WILD C OMPANY
t Tailors - State Street

_i

IKOS STAMPS
:D BY THE
:D STATES
;RtNMENT

"Katmai and the Ten Thousand
Smokes" will be the subject of a lec-
ture to be delivered at 3 o'clock Fri-
day afternoon, March 29, in the Nat-
ural Science auditorium by Prof. Rob-
ert F. Briggs, associate professor of
botany in Ohio State university.
Professor Briggs has made four ex-
peditions to the volcanic region of
Katmai, in Alaska, three of which
have been under the auspices of the
National Geographic society. The
first of these trips was taken in 1913.
and the last was made during the
summer of 1917, when 19 men accom-
panied the professor.
Dr. Van Der Slice Holds Clinic
Dr. R. _R. Van der Slice, medical
director of the Michigan anti-tuber-
culosis association, held the last of a
series of tubercular clinics in the
Saginaw city hall last evening. He
will return to Ann Arbor this morr-
W! ing.

WHn
TheC
T
"Chin Ch
-A talet
Toys-Li
-A realE
Sea

CHARLES DILLINCHAM'S

V

k;

k

IIGHT a r
The Only Company presenting
Greatest American Musical Comedy

With DOYLE AND DIXON
'wo Years at the Globe Theatre, N. Y.
hin" has a name that is magic - Music that is,
that is taken from the glitteriest of all Fairy S
ttle nifty Chinese Maids-Mandarins-Coolies
Circus Tent-Clowns- -Bareback Riders-A g
of Fun-Grotesque Dancing a plenty.

-cery
es-

Prices: 7S
it Sale star

00, $1.50, $2.00

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