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March 21, 1918 - Image 5

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1918-03-21

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

1t

f
i J
77

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.

I. L
.__- -
)J --'

Early Spring

re

g

Society Brand and
Hickey-Freeman Suits
Also just received a line of Spring Hats and

destiny of
d the qual-
youth, the
nent of ex-
value-best

A TYPICAL WAR SERVICE LIBRARY CAMP SHERIDAN

JEf uertkGC

& c O.

LAW SCHOOL REPORTS
ON FOOD CONSERVATION
BOARDING HOUSE MENUS FOR
WEEK ISSUED BY
SANITARIAN
Seventy - five per
cent of the Law
school students have
signed the food con-
servation p l e d g e
cards being distrib-
uted by the Univer-
sity health service, according to the
report issued yesterday. This college
has the best representation of any
which has taken up the campaign.
Cards are still being given out to the
student body in an attempt to have
the campaign a success on the cam-
pus. Michigan is the pioneer univer-
sity to take up conservation, and an
effort is being made to have the re-
sult satisfactory to the food adminis-
tration.
The conservation mends issued
weekly by Miss Sue C. Hamilton, san-

eipt of a
r flowers.
'ood taste
n the fair
send flow-
the fresh-
.soms, the
.e longest.

t an

213 E. LibertySt,
Phone 294

PERMANENT LIBRARIES
ESTABLISHED AT CAMPS
CANTONXENTS GET BUILDINGS
CONTAINING 20,000
VOLUNEES
Permanent libraries have lately
been erected in practically all the na-
tional guard camps in the United
States. Only the national and regular
army cantonments and the Great
Lakes naval station have been pro-
vided with permanent libraries, as it
was thought that the guardsmen's
camps would not be used long enough
to warrant the construction of per-
manent buildings.
These camp libraries are furnished
by the war library service of the Am-
erican Library association. Money for
the buildings is being furnished by the
Carnegie fund, and by contributions
from interested citizens. The build-
ings are of the same proportions and
materials as the camp barracks, but
are larger than these buildings.
Owing to the size of the canton-
ments, it has been found necessary for
each main station to have several sub-
stations, located in various barracks,
mess-rooms, hospitals, Y. M. C. A. and
K. of C. buildings. Each of these
branches is provided with a number
of new books daily. Each camp has
an automobile truck to be used in the
distribution of these books, and for
carrying newspapers and magazines
.o the branches.
The average library contains about
20,000 books, and each branch is fur-
nished with 1,000 volumes. The honor
system is usually used, thus eliminat-
ing most of the complexity of the
regular public library.
Many soldiers come from great dis-
tances in the camps, so as to take ad-
vantage of the larger circulation in
the main library. Frequently one man
represents a whole company, drawing
out books for all of his companions.
Time limits vary at the different'
camps.

SAY IT WITH FLOWERS

You Know the Reason

Come and see our choice selection of cut flowers and pl
Cousinsl & HalUNIV. A
Members of the Florists' Telegraph Delivery Associati
I Buy Your Spring Suit Now

Between the Theatres

D. E. Grennan

The Custom Tailor

606 E. L

.. itarian,
low:

for the boarding houses fol-

5l

PHONE 1101

Monday-Wheatless
Breakfast-Baked apples, rolled rye,
corn flakes, liberty toast, butter or
oleo, coffee or milk.
Lunch-Fried potatos, beef steak,
lettuce salad, brown bread, butter or
oleo, tapioca cream, tea or milk.
Dinner-Boiled potatoes, baked mut-
ton with mock oyster stuffing, Mexi-
can cold slaw, potato rolls, butter or
oleo, plum pie, coffee, tea or milk.
Tuesday-Meatless
Breakfast-Stewed prunes, hominy
grits, grape nuts, Liberty toast, butter
or oleo, coffee or milk.
Lunch-Salmon soup, creamed po-
tatoes, cheese souffle, pickles, bread,
butter or oleo, sauce and cake, tea or
milk.
Dinner-Baked potatoes, nut loaf,
creamed Lima beans, bread, butter or
oleo, pineapple salad, baked Indian
pudding, tea, coffee or milk.
Wednesday-IVWeatless
Breakfast-Bananas, rolled oats or
puffed rice, Liberty toast, butter or
oleo, coffee or milk.
Lunchi-Baked potatoes, creamed
dried beef, vegetable "tsalad, barley
muffins, butter or oleo, coffee jelly,
tea or milk.
Dinner-Mashed potatoes, rib roast,
spinach, corn bread, butter or oleo,
lemon whip with custard sauce, tea,
coffee or milk.

ri

GREGG -
SHORTHAND
BEGINNING CLASS
TO-DAY
I I or 3, Eastern Time
PHONE 342-R
Or Call at
Hamilton
Business
College
State and William Sts.

IISII
k 1

SP

rantI
S MAY FIND
VLVANIA FARMS

n work in Pennsylvania for the
g summer may be arranged for
'sity women from that part of
ountry, through the efforts of
Agnes E. Wells, acting dean of

ng, is In response to requests from a num-
ceived ber of women, Miss Wells has been
Inited communicating about the subject with
of the Dr. Isabel Maddison, recording dean
of Bryn Mawr college. This college
com- is forming a unit for agricultural
)oses vork, which will probably be limited
ge of to its own girls.
rsons Dr. Maddison has referred the mat-
gov- ter to Dr. Ida Ogilvie of Barnard col-
.p the lege, who is a leader in the movement
among college women. It is reported
ponse that there will be a number of oppor-
furth- tunities available in Pennsylvania, and
-ks in perhaps in New England.
s for

Thursday
Breakfast-Oranges, barley grits or
maple flakes, Liberty toast, butter or
oleo, coffee or milk.
Lunch-Barley soup, scalloped po-
tatoes, meat loaf, creamed peas, bread,
butter or oleo, sauce and cake, tea or
milk.
Dinner--Baked potatoes, roast pork
with dressing, horseradish sauce, com-
bination salad, bread, butter or oleo,
chocolate pie, whipped cream, . tea,
coffee or milk.

corn flakes, Liberty toast, coffee or
milk.
Lunch-Split pea soup, lyonnaise
potatoes, hash on toast, dill pickles,
bread and butter or oleo, fruit salad,
cake, tea or milk.
Dinner-Boiled potatoes, meat pie,
stewed tomatoes, asparagus salad,
bread and butter, or oleo, coconut
pudding, chocolate sauce, tea, coffee
or milk.
Sunday
Breakfast - Grapefruit, bran. pan-
cakes and syrup, Liberty toast, butter
or oleo, coffee or milk.
Dinner - Mashed potatoes, chicken
with egg dumplings, creamed vege-
table oysters, cucumber salad, French
dressing, bread and butter or oleo,
raspberry pie with ice cream, tea,
coffee or milk.
lunch-Barley salad, sandwiches,
olives, sauce and cake, tea, coffee.,
milk or cocoa.
PATRIOTIC GROUPS
CHOOSE CAPTAINS
Captains have been selected for the
county and state groups, organized
by University women for patriotic
educational work. The groups are
working under the direction of Miss
Agnes E. Wells, acting dean of wo-
men, who believes that the college
trained woman may be most useful to
the government as a member of an
organization which will assume lead-
ership in the community. a
The captains are as follows: Mary
McDonald, '18, with headquarters at
Detroit; Margaret Henderson, '18, at

A Ali
JJ

7r

Ann Arbor; Ruth _ Bailey, '18, at
Adrian; Katherine Harrington, '18,
at Kalamazoo; Margaret Yerkes, '18,
at Port Huron; Helen Bullis, '18, at
Lansing; Valora Quinlan, '18, at
Grand Rapids; Mabel Sanborn, '18, at
Saginaw; Olive Wiggins, '19, at Bay
City; Catherine Wynne, '18, at Reed
City; Julienne Kerr, '19, at Traverse
City; Margaret Tremaine, '18, at Al-
pena; and Lois Bennallack, '19, of
,Upper Michigan; Pauline Champlin,
'18, of the out of 'States groups; also
Helen Ahrens, '18, of the eastern
states; Lucille Crissey, '18, of the mid-
dle western states, and Wilma Flack,
'18, of the western states.
Under each captain are four or
more lieutenants who will call the
monthly meetings and constitute a
general executive committee. The
lieutenants will also have charge of
three sub-grounds handling three
phases of war work, Red Cross, food
conservation, and propaganda. ThoseI
women in the Red Cross division are
urged to take courses of all kinds at
Angell house. Miss Elizabeth Dean,
in charge of the house is arranging
to give them a talk each month. The
students interested in food conserva-
tion are attending the food lectures
given by Prof. H. W. Emerson -and
Miss Grace Greenwood and others.
They are supposed to take an inter-
est in agricultural units formed
among the women of the country.
Educational lectures have been ar-
ranged to instruct those in the third
sub-group on questions of national
efficiency, labor, war finance, and re-
construction.

Mart

nI

r Gregg Shorthand. Beginning Class
r starts 11 or 3 Eastern Time today.
. Hamilton Business College, State and
- William.-Adv.
1 IDancing Friday and Saturday nights
at the Armory.-Adv.

Friday
Breakfast-Dates, farina or puffed
corn, Liberty toast, butter or oleo,
coffee or milk.
Lunch-Potato cakes, scalloped sal-
mon; lettuce, Thousand Island dress-
ing, bread and butter or oleo, sauce
and cake, tea or milk.
Dinner -- Mashed potatoes, baked
fish, -dressing, beets, lemon butter,
chopped pickles, bread and butter;
strawberry Bavarian cream, tea, coffee
or milk. '
Saturday
Breakfast-Apricots, cut oatmeal or

spring suits and top c
more snappy than e
spring; the kind of clot
blooded young men
wearing. They have inc
ed in them all the style
cies that will be popul;
We have bought freel
a consequence offer yo
of a stock unequalled
ness of choice and va
style, anywhere but
shops. You will fir
clothes as good as you
in any city, and the
more reasonable.
New neckwear, Ste:
Knox Hats.

.eave Copy
aIt
Students'
upply Store

Reule,
The E
ner and
west Co
ton Stre

1 "

Two May Festival Cover
Two dollars each. Worth
rs. Call 100-M.

-One Pre-Festival
Call 2220 between

Coup-
12 and

We Represent the
Steinway, Knabe, Vose & Sons, Sohmer, Grinnell Bros.,
Sterling, Shominger, and many other makes.
The, world's famous Pianola Player Pianos, Victor
Victrolas. SATISFACTION GUARANTEED.

I

REGISTRATION OF WOMEN
REACHES ONE HUNDRED SIXTY

men are
possible.

Registration of w
still below par, is gai
About, 160 women hav

iR TNN V

BROS.,

I1

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