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October 12, 1917 - Image 2

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1917-10-12

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

r THE MICHIGAN DAILY FRIDAY, OCTOBER 12, 1917.

MEMBER ASSOCIATED PRESS
Official newspaper at the University of
ichigan . Published every morning except
onday during the university year.
Entered at the postoffice at Ann Arbor as
:ond-class matter.
Offices: Ann Arbor Press Building. Sub-
riptions: by carrier, $2.50; by mail, $3.00.
ant ad stations: Quarry's; Students' Sup-
y Store; The Delta.' Phones: Business, 960;
litorial, 2414.
Communications not to exceed 300 words
length, or notices of events will be pub-
hed in The Daily, at the discretion of the
litor, if left at the office in the Ann Arbor
ess Bldg., or in the notice box in the west
rridor of the general library, where the
tices are collected at 7:30 o'clock each
ening.
>bert T. McDonald.......Managing Editor
Philip Emery..........Business Manager

6t Y 9!

Employment Office

Parties needing student help Saturday
should call

I

823 today

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rold Makinson........Advertising
ul E. Cholette.......Publication
rnard WohI.......... Circulation
rold R. Smith...........redit
m. M. LeFevre..........Office
Ellsworth Robinson.. Subscription

Manager
Manager
Ianager
Manager
Manager
Manager

NIGHT EDITORS
Bruce A. Swaney James Scherinerhorn, Jr.
Harry Carey C.S. Clark, Jr.
Clarence L. Roeser
REPORTERS
Albert E. Horne, Jr. Bruce Millar
Philip C. Pack e Harry EVaWeinerman
Denman H. Cruttenden Edgar L.. Rice
Mildred C. Mighell Mark K. Ehlbert
Eugene Given
BUSINESS STAFF
L. A. Storrer Orville E. Gates
Wmn. A. Leitzinger Harry D. irlause
Dale H. Baad Lambert Hirsheimer
FRIDAY, OCTOBER 12, 1917.
Night Editor-J. Schermerhorn, Jr.
THEY HAVE ANSWERED
Thirteen hundred Michigan men
have so far rendered to their nation
the highest service human beings are
called upon to bestow-themselves.
In such times as the pr.esnt we
think in terms of really big things.
Important occurrences in life's daily
round of events three years ago take
small plce beside the acrifi'ces men
are making today.
America has changed much in this
short time. The whole world has
changed. Our own characters have
changed. We have turned from a train
of local thoughts to thoughts which
center about the national and world
destinies.
These Michigan men have heard the
call to give up individual happiness
for universal happiness. They have
done so without complaint. They are
pioneers who will change the aspect
of the world for all time.
Michigan turns them over to a great-
er field - the performance of their
duty,
THE FIFTH ANNUAL CONVOCA-
TION
Today for the fifth time the entire
University will meet in Hill auditor-
ium for one hour. It is in this period
of national crisis that Convocation
day should have a deeper spiritual
meaning for all of us. It is the sense
of unity among students, among the1
University, among the members of the
nation that such an occasion develops
and fosters.
There are few among the most blase
of the students and the faculty of
Michigan who do not feel a thrill of:
loyalty and a deeper responsibility to-
ward their Alma Mater because of
Convocation. It is the only time in
the year that regents, faculty, and stu-
dents assemble together.
Come out for Convocation today.
It is one of your best opportunities
to show your appreciation for what
Michigan has done for you and your
devotion to her as a Michigan man.

w1omen I
Women's league board of represent-
atives meets at 9 o'clock tomorrow
morning at Barbour gymnasium.
Regular gym classes began yester-
day and attendance was taken.
place at 6 o'clock tomorrow night in
Barbour gymnasium. Tickets will be
given to freshmen today at Newberry
hall. The price for upperclassmen is
50 cents.
Supper for the students' Liberty
loan committee will be served at the
Union tonight immediately after Con-
vocation.
Juniors and seniors interested in
hockey should see Miss Marion Wood
at Barbour gymnasium before 5
o'clock Monday afternoon.
Class periods are posted on the bul-
letin board and girls taking gymnas-
ium work are held responsible for
them.
Engineering News
An attempt by a German student
enrolled in the engineering college to
reconcile some of the differences be-
tween the United States and Germany
will be printed in the Technic, to ap-
pear late this month. It is entitled,
"The Inside of the Cup." A member
o the editorial staff said yesterday
that the article is not written in a
controversial spirit, and that it con-
tains nothing to offend even the most
patriotic individual.
Other articles will be, "The Role of
Chrome Vanadium Steel," by F. J.
Griffiths, vice-president of the Central
Steel company; "Alloy Steel," by D.
N. A. Blacet," metalluringist of the
Central Steel company, and "Coin-
mercial Development of Technical
Business," by George H. Gibson, '89E,
of New York City.
A picture of the demolishing of the
old Literary tower serves as frontis-
piece, and several other cuts of cam-
pus scenes and views of Camp Davis
will appear, together with cartoons
with general campus appeal. The
cover design is the same as that used
last year, and the number of pages
about the same.
Subscription price and price of sin-
gle copies has been raised to keep
pace with rising expenses. Yearly
subscriptions now cost $1.50 and sin-
gle copies 40 cents, a raise of 50 cents
on the year and 15 cents on the copy.
There is no change, however, in the
arrangement whereby a membership
in the Engineering society and a
year's subscription to the Technic is
given for $1.25.
The corduroy trouser has had its
day, and indications are that it will
not be seen on the campus this year.
The upper classes have not had
their assemblies yet, but several mem-
bers gave as their opinion yesterday
that the distinctive "breeches" would
give way before the khaki uniforms
the men will wear in drill classes.
The civil engineering branch of the
Engineering society met in society
rooms Wednesday night and elected
officers for the second year. Robert
A. Kimberly, '18E, was elected presi-
dent; G. Maurice Gay, '17E, vice-presi-
dent, and James R. Hill, '18E, secre-
tary-treasurer.
Plans for the Camp Davis dance to
be given later in the year are being
discussed. The committee has not
yet been appointed and nothing def-
unite can be done until then.

Several naval reserves not caught
in the draft have been granted leaves
of absence for the school year. Two
of these, Raymond Sherrick, '20E, and
Vernon D. White, '20E, have enrolled
in the engineering college.
I)QRXTilY HALL, '18, FIRST NICH.
WOMAN TO GET ASSISTANTSHIP

Spicy NewsFrom
Other Univerities
Eleven freshman and seven sopho-
more companies have been organized
at the University of Wisconsin in the
reserve officers' training corps.
Waiters in one of the dormitories at
Syracuse university have struck be-
cause the attempt was made to charge
them $1.00 a week for their board in
addition to their work of waiting table.
The University of Washington Daily
is now being issued from new and
specially equipped quarters.
A Liberty Loan committee at Ohio
State university is trying to sell a
Liberty Bond to every instructor and
employee of the university, in order
to place Ohio State ahead of every
school in the country as' regards re-
sponse to the appeal of the govern-
ment.
Dancing at the University of Illinois
has not suffered from the war, accord-
ing to an article in the Daily Illini.
Attempts of students and faculty at
the University of Nebraska to abolish
formal dances during the year are be-
ing opposed by the sororities.
An aerodynamical laboratory is be-
ing built at the University of Wash-
ington.
Women at the University of Illinois
are giving three cents a week each
for an ilini chocolate and tobacco
fund.
FORTY GIRLS IN UNIVERSITY
WORK FOR THEIR EDUCATION
The College Girls' employment com-
mittee, who have already placed about
40 girls, desire to announce that there
will be an opportunity for girls to
earn part of their living by doing sew-
ing and mending.
A regular schedule is made out
through Dean Jordan's office, whereby
the different kinds of work are class-
ified. Opportunities open to those who
wish to support themselves while in
college are various. Fifteen girls have
secured places in private families,
where they earn their room and
board, while the number of girls wait-
ing table is approximately 25. In
addition, there are a number of girls
who find employment during free
hours taking care of children or do-
ng clerical work.
Mrs. Jordan states that three of the
girls of last year's Junior class who
received the highest grades were self
supporting girls.
SYRACUSE GAME AVIATOR
DROWNS IN LAKE ST. CLAIR
F. G. McKee, the aviator who creat-
ed a sensation last fall by flying over
Ferry field, during the Syracuse game,
was drowned Wednesday afternoon
when he fell with his machine into
Lake St. Clair.
Mr. McKee had offered his services
to the United States army aviation
corps but was rejected on account
of physical unfitness. For the past
three months he had been an instruc-
tor in aviation at Selfridge field, Mt.
Clemens.
RECEPTION FOR NEW FACULTY
MEMBERS TO BE HELD TONIGHT
A reception to the new members of

the several faculties of the University
will be given by the President and
Regents Friday, Oct. 12 . The changes
in the teaching staff caused by the ab-
sence of the many men who have en-
tered the National service, are so great
this year, that the committee in charge
of the reception may fail to send invit-
ations to all. It is hoped that every
man having the rank of instructor, or
of a higher rank, will be present at
the reception, even though he fails
to receive a formal invitation.

L

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Use
Adv.

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Convocation today.

The freshman may be very econ-
omical. Fifty cents for a pot, and
the same amount for a toque.
Donned your "heavies" yet?
A freshman, very green, was seen
in the company of two upperclassmen
promenading across the campus yes-
terday with a numeral pipe in his
mouth.
The Cosmopolitan club has not yet
organized. "Hooray," says the lino-
type man.
FRESHMAN CAPT AIN FOR ANAL
CLASS RUSH CHOSEN TUENDAY
All freshmen will meet at the audi-
torium of University Hall at 7 o'clock
Tuesday morning, for the purpose of
choosing a captain to lead them in the
flag rush.
Any freshman that knows a man in
the class with brains, and ability to
lead and command, a good voice, and
a few pounds of beef, is urged to be
ready to nominate him and tell the
class in a few words the qualifications
of his candidate aid give briefly his
record as a leader. The best man in
the class is needed and every fresh-
man should help find him.
Recreation makes for E.fiiciency.
"We try to treat you right." Huston
Bros.-Adv. tf.

Dorothy Hall, '18, has the honor of
being the first woman at Michigan to
win an assistantship in the chemistry
department. Miss Hall is a senior
chemical engineering student from
Toledo. She has been appointed lab-
oratory assistant to Dr. H. H. Wil-
lard.

BEAUTY SHOP
Miss Mable Rowe, Shampoo,
icure, Massage, and Chiropody.
N. Fifth Ave. 2402.-Adv.

Man-
326

1 1

Officers' Uniforms and accessories.
Patronize Our Advertisers.-Adv., G. H. Wild & Co., State Street.-Adv.

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