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October 12, 1917 - Image 1

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1917-10-12

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OR FIRST LIST OF MICHIGAN MEN IN SERVICE SEE PAGE 5

THE WEATHER
COLDER; PROBABLE
RAIN TODAY

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ASSOCIATED
PRESS
DAY AND NIGHT WIRE
SERVICE

XXVIII. No. 10.

ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN, FRIDAY, OCTOBER 12, 1917.

PRICE THREE CENTS

-PRICE THP.euu v?!M'ro

D

BOND SOLIGITORS
BANQUETAT U NION
TO DISCUSS PLANS
EVERY CAMPUS ORGANIZATION
REPRESENTED AT DINNER
THIS EVENING
WOMEN'S DRIVE FOR
BOND STARTS TODAY
Statistics from Large Citices Through-
out 'Country Are More Favor-
able Than Ever
More than 150 students and faculty
members representing every organiza-
tion of Michigan's campus will meet
at a Liberty loan campaign dinner
Friday evening at the Michigan Union.
The dinner will follow Convocation,
and the campaign committee will meet
at 5:30 o'clock in the Union rooms. A
charge of 45 cents will be made for
the dinner.
Reports from the faculty committee
selling subscriptions in the various de-
partments indicate that the bonds pur-
chased by faculty members will reach
their goal of $85,000.
At the dinner explanations of how
to canvass students for the loan will
be made, and lieutenants will be ap-
pointed to handle the two weeks' drive
which opens Saturday morning. The
University's quota of the loan is $200,-
000.

1~*

ABOUT LIBERTY LOANING
Columbus discovered America
525 years ago today.. You are
asked to help save that discov-
ery to posterity by the purchase
of a LIBERTY LOAN bond now.
A Russian-Pole in Camp Cust-
er, earning $30 a month bought
the first loan bond sold there.
He liquidated his patriotism,
what about yours? Has it any
purchasing powerl
These soldiers have offered
to give their lives in this hour
of America's need-now thcY
are campaigning for bonds
among themselves. Are you so
steeped in the dye of flag-wav-
ing patriotism that you will let
these boys do it ALLI
Figure it out for yourself,
why do they caull 'em LIBERTY
loan bonds? Liberty loan bonds,
a good buy for you; goodbye for
the kaiser.
The Liberty loan cappaign among
University women is to be launched
today.
Dean Myra B. Jordan, Anna Lloyd,
'18, president of the Women's league,
and Mildred Mighell, '18, women's
editor of The Michigan Daily, are di-
recting the movement. The pommittee
consists of five representatives from
Martha Cook building, three from
Newberry residence, and one from
each sorority, league house, and cam-
pus organization of importance.
Ann Arbor Subscribes $43,350
By subscribing $43,350 to the Lib-
erty loan on the second day of the
campaign, the Ann Arbor committee
more than doubled the amount of the
first day. This nmakes a total of $61,-
300 bought in the first two days, ex-
cluding University subscriptions.
Mrs. Ella G. Heartt, chairman of
the women's county committee, ar-
ranged for a meeting of the women's
organizations of Ann Arbor at the
Congregational church at 3:30 o'clock
today when the Liberty loan campaign
is to be launched among the women
of the country.
In order to promote the sales of the
Liberty bonds, Gov. A. E. Sleeper des-
ignated Monday, Oct. 15, as a patriotic
day for 1e schools throughout the
state. Chairman George W. Millen
of the county committee yesterday
made public the following telegram
he received from the governor:
"I have today wired the school com-
missioner of your county urging that
he co-operate with you to provide
speakers for the school house meet-
ings in the various districts to be
held the evening of Monday, Oct. 15.
May I depend on you to get in touch
with him that we may have a light
in the window of every school house
in the state on that evening with a
(Continued on Page Six.)

SUSPECT STUDENT$
OF POISON PLOT
Government Investigating Plan to
Kill Members of Princeton
Aviation School
Princeton, N. Y., fact. 11.-Military
authorities are said to be investigat-
ing an alleged plot to poison several
hundred students at the government
aeronautical school.
Samuel o. Lvingood, a student at
the school in whose room a large
quantity of posion crystals was said
to have been found, is reported to
have been arrested and taken to Gov-
ernor's Island for court martial.
Neither the authorities at the avia-
tion school nor officials at the univer-
sity will discuss any phase of the case.
WALLI- GURCI SINGS
IN FULTLESS MANNER
Famous Soprano Subscribes $25,000 to
Second Bond Issue of Lib-
erty Loan
Bowing graciously to persistent and
enthusiastic demands for encores,
Mme. Amelita Galli-Curci won the
hearts of her first Ann Arbor audi-
ence completely last night, with a pro-
gram exceeded in beauty and width of
range only by her perfect voice and
sympathetic interpretation.
During the rendition of the "Bell
Song" from the French opera "Lak-
me," the breath of every hearer was
held as the liquid tones of the great
soprano mingled imperceptibly with
those of Mr. Berenger's flute. The
Grieg group of French pastoreles
gave much delight also, and the mad
scene from "Lucia" brought the en-
thusiasm to a climax. Little songs
in English were offered and joyfully
received as encores.
Scarcely had the last poignant notes ,
of "Home, Sweet Hone" died away
when groups of adoring girls crowded
her dressing room asking for auto-
graphs.
"I am so tired, you cannot imagine,"
she said after the concert. "But you
ask me'if I have bought bonds. I
have, $25,000 worth of them. For I
love America and I am at home in it."1
Before the start of the concert, Re-
gent J. E. Beal made a plea to buy
Liberty bonds. "The government has
the right totdemand, but it is note de- 1
nanding. It is asking rather, that we
loan money," Regent Beal stated.
WOMEN ASSUME CANVASS ROLE I
TO BOOST DAILY CIRCULATION
A rousing campaign among women
or subscriptions to The Daily began
ruesday morning. Before tonight a
very girl in the University will be e
personally canvassed., .o
"The subscription list will be con- f
5iderably larger after we get through," s
paid Kathrine Kilpatrick, '19, who is R
lirecting the campaign. y
Divided into four teams, 45 girls
re making a systematic tour of Ann P
krbor, and if any girl is missed, she a
s more than ordinarly elusive. The v
earn bringing in the largest list of H
ames in proportion to the number of t
irls in the territory will receive the A
onors of the contest.

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IPROPERTY OF MEN OF MICHIGAN WHO ENTERED THE

/

SERVICE

BRHINGS CAMPAIGN
DRIVETO CLOSE
NAMES OF MEN ON WINNING
TEAMS AND CAPTAINS WILL
VILL BE ANNOUNCED
ORGANIZATION GAINS
MANY NEW MEMBERS
"Percentage of Decrease Is Propor-
tional to Number Students En.
rolled, Asserts Heath
With a shout of victory and hopes
fulfilled, Michigan Union workers
wound up the Union's annual mem-
bership campaign last night. Al-
though complete returns are not yet
available, the outlook points to a
Union membership that will equal
that of last year.
There are now 1,200 active yearly
members, with . indications that the
1,500 mark will be reached by Nov. 1.
In addition there are some 1,100 par-
ticipation life members on the cam-
pus.
"Each year as the number of life
members on the campus increases, the
number of yearly members decreases,
but not in the same proportion," said
Homer L. Heath, secretary of the
Union. "The absence of 1,600 men
from the campus naturally would af-
fect materially the membership in the
Union. If there is any decrease in the
membership this year, it will not "be
in the same ratio as the decrease in
the number of students enrolled, as
the membership has already forged
ahead of last year, based upon the
percentage of decrease."
Campaign Launched Last Tuesday
The campaign w a s formally
launched Tuesday night after a din-
ner attended by all members of the
committee. The dinner was enlivened
by talks given by Francis Bacon, '02,
director of social activities; George
Hurley, '18, vice-president of the

?AU&W .rT ' ^

IT'S UP TO US FILL THEM

BE HELD TODAY
Faculty and Regents to Convene with
Students in Hill Audi-
torium
PRESIDENT HUTCHINS TO GIVE
OPENING SPEECH OF MEETING
Dean Henry M. Bates to Deliver Main
Address of After-
noon
When the fifth annual Convocationj
assembles at 3:30 o'clock Friday aft-
ernoon in Hill auditorium, the only'
opportunity for the Regents, president,
aculty and the students to convene to
ignify their loyalty of the University
will be afforded during the 1917-19181
ear.
The program will be as follows:
Prelude, "Entree du Cortege," Assist-
,nt Prof. Earl V. Moore; invocation;
ocal solo; Convocation address, Dean
Henry M. Bates; "America"; benedic-
ion; prelude, "Lauidate Dominum,"
ssistant Prof. Earl V. Moore.
A few introductory remarks will be:
nade by President Harry B. Hutchins,
hile the main address of the after-
oon will be given by Dean Henry M.
ates of the Law school. The music
s under the guidance of Prof. A. A.
tanley of the School of Music.
Exercises Will Be Short
Brief exercises will characterize
onvocation, and the entire services
ill not last more than an hour. Be-
ause of the importance of this event,
nd the short space of time allotted
or it, President Huchins has ex-
(Continued on Page Six.)

LITTLE FIGHTING ON BATTLE
FRONT IN WESTERN SECTION
Rain Postpones Attack Against Ger-
mans for Several
Days
(By Associated Press.)
Comparatively little fighting activity
is in progress on any of the battle
fronts except in the nature of
reciprocal bombardments. In Fland-
ers Thursday, both the British and
French troops kept to their trenches.
The big guns on both sides, how-
ever, were shelling opposing positions
vigorously, those of the allies in work
of destruction and those of the Ger-
mans in the nature of disturbers of
peace of the allies in their new
trenches.
Additional rain over this region has
accentuated th'e swamped condition of
ground and it will probably be several
days before- the British and French
can jointly unleash their men for an-
other raid against the Germans. Along
the southern front in France, the Ger-
mans again have met with defeat in
attempts to capture positions on the
east front of the Meuse in the Ver-
dun sector. The attacks, however,
were not made in strong forces, being
more in the nature of trench raiding
operations.
FRENCH MEDICAL OFFICER TO
SPEAK ON WAR SANITATION
Col. C. U. Dercle of the French med-
ical service will give a motion picture
talk on the "Sanitary Service of the
French Front," at 12:30 o'clock this
afternoon in the new Natural Science
auditorium. The lecture precedes the
Convocation exercises.,

- 9
Less Than Seven Per Cent of $5,000,-
000 of Minimum Reached
Last Night
"COUNTRY MUST WORK HARD
DURING REST- OF CAMPAIGN"
Only $325,465,000 Subscribed to Date;
14 Working Days Remain to
Complete Work
Washington, Oct. 11.-Less than
seven per cent of the $5,000,000,000
which the government hopes to ob-
tain in subscriptions to the second
liberty loan had been subscribed at
the close of business last night.
Treasury officials made public the
actual subscription figures tonight.
The total ,is $325,465,000. This figure
includes every dollar reported to the
reserve banks from every section of
the United States. In one reserve dis-
trict, however, Minneapolis, no figures
were reported.
"The subscription indicates the nec-
essity for the hardest kind of work
on the part of the whole country for
the balance of the campaign," reads
the treasury announcement.
The campaign is more than one-
third gone. Fourteen working days
remain. Subscriptions from the Chi-
cago federal reserve district amount
to $4,816,000.
The secretary of the treasury has
requested subscriptions to an amount
of five billions in order that allotments
might be made up to four billion. The
average daily subscriptions must
amount to more than 208 million.

Union, and Gerald L. Kesler, '17, in
charge of the committees. Mr. Bacon
spoke on the ideals of the Union,
Kesler explained the campaign, and
Hurley gave the financial statement
of the organization.
The names of the members of the
winning teams and their captains will
be run in The Daily of Saturday, when
complete returns are at hand.
GIANTS TIE WHITE SOX BY
5-0 VICTORY IN FOURTH GAME
New York, Oct. 11.-The New York
Nationals battered their way to. vic-
tory over the Chicago Americans here
today by a score of 5-0, and are
travelling westward tonight on even
terms with their rivals in the strug-
gle for world series victory.
Each team now has won two con-
tests and indications point to a full
seven game drivembefore either club
accept the supremacy of the other.
The victory of the Giants in the
fourth game was the most impressive
of the struggle to date. Ferdinand
Shupp turned the White Sox batters
down without a run and Bennie Kauff
led the batting massacre with two
home runs. This was teh last game in
which the players participate in the
gate receipts and later on the White
Sox and Giants will divide $152,888.68
as their share of the admission charg-
es for the first four games.
COMMITTEE INVESTIGATES
LA FOLLETTE'S STATEMENT
Washington, Oct. 11.-Lines of the
inquiry into Senator LaFollette's al-
leged disloyal speech at St. Paul be-
came more definitely fined today with
the Senate Investigating Committee's
receipt of a letter from the Senator-
outlining his position and transmit-
ting a drafted transcript of his ad-
dress.
He asked to examine an-y witnesses
called by the committee and to submit
his in testimony and expressed a de-
sire to be heard should statements
of fact in his speech or his right to
make it be questioned.
Tomorrow the committee will meet
to plan further action and probably
will temporarily halt the inquiry to
await a statement, from Mr., Bryan
who already has denied publicly that
be knew the Lusitania carried muni-
tions.

1

DUTCH STEAMER ARRIVES WITH
GERMAN DIPLOMATS; REPORT
A Pacific Port, Oct. 11.-The Dutch
steamer Oranje arrived today from the
Orient with a large number of Ger-
man and Austrian diplomats aboard,
it was reported. Government officials
headed by secret service men boarded
the vessel. No mail was allowed to
land and all information was with-
held. No passengers were permitted
to leave the steamer.

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FRESHMEN
A complimentary ticket to the Annual Y. W. C. A. Banquet
waits for you at Newberry Hall. GET IT TODAY.

1

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