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March 08, 1918 - Image 1

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Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1918-03-08

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11

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tt

II

DAY AND NI
SERV

ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN, FRIDAY, MARCH 8, 1918. PRICE T

MOST OF STUDENTS
BELONG TO CHURCH,

STUDENT HOUSES
FORM FOOD BOARD

Three-fourths of Michigan's student
body attend church, according to stat-
istics compiled by the University Y.
M. C. A. from data gathered during
enrollment last fall. There were 2,258
men and 766 women students who'
registered as church members, while
561 men and 232 women expressed a
preference without being members of
any church. More than 800 students
registered non-preference, which rep-
resented 21 per cent of the men and 7
per cent of the women enrolled.
Twenty-one different denominations'
Were mentioned, which ranked as fol-
lows in membership: Methodist 557,
Presbyterian 546, Episcopal 421, Con-
gregational 396, Roman Catholic 349,
Baptist 192, Lutheran 177, Jewish 140,
Church of Christ 68, Reformed 58,
Christian Science 31, Evangelical 28,
Unitarian and Universalist 25, Chris-
tian Reformed 13, Friends 6, Seventh
Day Adventists 6, United Brethren 3,
Greek Catholic 3, Swedish Lutheran 2,
Swedenborger 1, Mormon 1, Armenian
Apostolic 1, and Swedish Mission 1
(preference).

In.:.

ess)

opera-
re re-
t. In
:olonel
The

" ENGINEERS NEED R.O.T.IC
,:; TRAINING; DEAN'. CODLEY
+n

WILL WANT TO BECOME
FFICERS AND DRILL IS
NECESSARY

19

Health Service Calls Representatives
of Fraternities, Sororities, and
League Organizations
BODY WILL BE RESPONSIBLE
FOR CONSERVATION OF SUPPLIES
Everybody Expected to Sign Pledge
To Do All He Can To Prevent
Wastage of Edibles
Representatives from practically all
the fraternity, sorority, league, and
boarding houses met last evening in
Barbour gymnasium to organize the
regular board of representatives of
the University Health service.
The organization will be composed
of a delegate from each house. The
members will gather whenever called
by Dr. Forsythe, and will be respon-
sible for sanitation and, food condi-
tions in their individual houses. Much
can be accomplished through this me-
dium, it is said. A few years ago such
an organization was in existence, and
it acomplished much in the bettering
of conditions. Recently the organi-
zation declined through neglect, and
it was not reorganized until last night.
Prevent Food Waste
The first matter brought to the at-
tention of the repreentatives was the
necessity of food conservation in an
effort to win the war. It was pointed
out that every house is wasting a con-
siderable amount of food daily that
should be conserved for the army's
welfare. Mr. C. C. Freeman of the
county food conservation committee
emphasized the need of the country
and the allies for food, and the duty
of every student to save every scrap.
Mr. Freeman stated that Ann Arbor
has saved more than 10 tons of meat
in the past month, with many families
not attempting to conserve. With
complete co-operation much more
could be saved.
Everybody to Sign Pledge
Miss Sue C. Hamilton, sanitarian of
the health service, asked that each
delegate take charge of conservation
pledge cards in his house. It is ex-
pected that each student will sign a
card. The total number will be re-
turned to the health service by the del-
egates before 5 o'clock this after-
noon. A large number of pledges
have already been signed.
Michigan is the first university to
take up this movement, according to
Miss Hamilton. The success here is
expected to result in its being carried
into every college in the country. The
need of health service delegates has
been felt for some time. This action
will start the body of the organization
on its extensive work, it is believed.

ellor of "There can be no question of the ad-
sing the visability or even the necessity of mil-
e of the itary training in college prior to en-
the mil- tering special service, and although I
ch and cannot speak for the Medical school,
for Law the students of the Engineering school'
lies still who are enlisted in the reserve, may
an pow- continue in the officers' training course
ovement here," said Dean Mortimer E. Cooley
sia, but yesterday, referring to the question of
ght not men of the engineering reserve tak-
d to the ing the R. O. T. C. course.
n Mace- "The young men will want to be-
le price come officers as soon as they become
ry yard fitted, and they should, for these men
will be especially adapt for a much
Japan- higher grade of work than a private.
If such Obviously the more military training
d, how- the men receive in college the more
or noth- quickly they will be able to realize'
Japan their ambitions and be capable of

ck i
trip
ever

BE6NPASFOR
3 RDLOANDR IVE
Four Representatives of Washtenaw
County Attend Meeting of
Local Chairmen
GEORGE W. MILLEN RETURNS
TO TAKE CHARGE OF WORK
Committee From State Organization
Here March 16 to Help Put
Campaign Across
Plans for the launching of the third
Liberty Loan will be officially begun
at 10 o'clock this morning at a meet-
ing of the Michigan and Illinois
county committeemen at the LaSalle
hotel, Chicago. 'Four representatives
of Washtenaw county left for Chicago
last night to attend the conference.
They are: Roscoe 0. Bonisteel, '12L,
of Ann Arbor; Mr. Nathan S. Pot-
ter of Chelsea; Dr. Kenneth Noble of
Milan; and Hugh E. Vandawalker of
Ypsilanti.
Representatives Confer
Bonisteel returned from Lansing
yesterday morning where he attended
a conference, with representatives
throughout the state at Governor A.
E. Sleeper's offices. An organization
consisting of members of all state
departments at Lansing has been or-
ganized to assist the local and coun-
ty committees of the state in their
campaign for the selling of Liberty
bonds. A committee was appointed to
visit every county in the state on a
three weeks' tour and to assist the
workers in the coming campaign. Th.is
committee will be in Ann Arbor on
March 16.
The Liberty Loan as well as all
other war work including the sale of
Thrift stamps, will from now on be
conducted by war preparedness com-
mittees. George W. Millen of Ann Ar-
bor, chairman of the Washtenaw
county committee and former chair-
man of the second Liberty Loan com-
mittee, is now on his way from Cal-
ifornia where he has been recuperat-
ing from ill health. He will assume
full charge, of the work of the com-
mittee for the campaign.
DRAFT BOARD MAKES
NEW CLASSIFICATION
Washington, March 7.-Re-classifi-
cation, according to physical condi-
tion, of the men called in the next
army draft is provided fi the revised
instructions for medical advisory
boards which are being sent to the
local boards throughout the country.
The new regulations made public to-
night require that every man sum-
moned before the board shall be plac-
ed in one of the following four class-
es:
A. Acceptable for general military
service.
B. Acceptable for general military
service after being cured of remedial
defects.
C. Acceptable for special or limit-
ed military service in a classified cap-
acity or occupation.
D. Rejected and exempted from
any military service.
Under the new regulations, many
ailments and defects which gained
exemption of drafted men in the past
now will result in their being listed
in group B.
WOMEN'S MILITARY TRAINING
ADVOCATED BY DEAN COOLEY

Women as well as men should be
required to take military training, de-
clares Dean Mortimer E. Cooley. In
an interview yesterday afternoon,
Dean Cooley expressed himself as ad-
vocating universal military training,
and said that women who have the
franchise and share equal privileges
with the men should also assume
equal responsibilities. Military train-
ing, he explained, is an advantage in
social and economic spheres as well as
a military necessity. Not for the pur-
pose of militarizing the nation but in
order to upbuild her general welfare
he advocates this movement.
War Finance Corporation is Created
Washington, March 7.--The admin-
istration bill to create a war finance
corporation with a fund of $4,500,000,-
000 to aid war industry was passed by
the senate late today and now goes
to the house. The vote was 74 to 3.

OPERA TICKETS GO
FAST FOR FRIDAY
"Let's Go!" tickets have been selling
rapidly during the last few days.
Practically all of the higher priced
seats for the Friday night perform-
ance are disposed of, and the tickets
for the Thursday night show have
been in nearly as great demand.
There are -still a number of good
seats available for the Wednesday
night and Saturday afternoon per-
formances, and the Union management
expects that few of these will remain
after the campus seat sale is closed
today.
University women and members of
the Union who have not already se-
cured their tickets may purchase thea
from 2 to 5 o'clock this afternoon at
Hill auditorium.
A seat sale for the general public
will be held Monday at the Whitney
theater.
U. o M MANIN FRANCE
ILUS IBBR'S ORK
L. S. THOMPSON, EX-'18 WRITES
OF AMERICAN UNIVERSITY
UNION
An appreciation of the American
University Union at Paris, and espec-
ially of Prof. C. B. Vibbert's work,
comes in a letter dated Feb. 9, from
Leland S. Thompson, ex-'18, serving
with the American ambulance corps in
France.
Thompson in speaking of a recent
furlough says, "I saw a great deal of
Dr. Vibbert, went to plays, stayed up
late, and got up later. You may tell
the people in Ann Arbor that the
Michigan representative is 'strictly on
the job.' I enjoyed his hospitality for
eight days, and I assure you that the
Union is ideal. It is ahead of the Y.
M. C. A. and every other similar or-
ganization.
"One feels free and completely at
home there. One eats well and inex-
pensively. There are dozens of at-
tractive books to read, as well as the
best and latest magazines. There is a
wonderful grand piano which has the
air of insisting that you play it, rater
than 'warning you to stay respectfully
away.
"And above all you never fail to
meet old friends there. Dr. Vibbert
gathers up a group of Ann Arbor men
from time to time and takes them out
to see his French friends-and he has
a lot of them. I was fortunate enough
to go to one of these parties. It was a
sort of soiree musicale and it would
take a whole letter to tell you what a
pleasure it was to find oneself in such
a fine group of people.
"I also saw Mr. Vinton of the gradu-
ate school, who had just arrived to
act as Dr. Vibbert's aide."
ROBERT W. WARD,'18 GIVEN
FIRST PLACE IN ORATORICAL
Robert T. Ward, '18, was awarded
first place and Herman A. August, '19,
second place at the Northern Orator-
ical league finals held at 8 o'clock last
evening in University hall.
Ward's oration as did those of the
other five contestants dealt witr
vital topics brought up by the present
war. While all the presentations were
regarded as exceptionally good,
"Money and Men," by August, and
"The Doom of Kultur," by Lois May,

18, were of such a quality as to cause
much uncertainty among the audience
as to who would be awarded the de-
cision. The margin between first and
second places, according to the judges,
was very narrow.
"A Permanent Peace," by Clarence
A. Daley, '20, and "The Freedom -of
the Future," by Kelsey Guilfoil were
the other two orations given.
Ward will be allowed to represent
the University in the Northern Ora-
torical league contest held in Ann Ar-
bor May &, in addition to being award-
ed the Chicago alumni medal and the
Kaufman testimonial of $100. August
will receive the 'Kaufman testimonia?
for second place of $50.
The judges were Dean Edward H.
Kraus, Secretary Shirley W. Smith,
Registrar Arthur G. Hall, Prof. Thom-
as Rankin, Judge George W. Sample,
Mrs. E. D. Kinne, and Miss Edith
Thm-c offnf aT--- IQF. nn1 -

HUN ARMIES
FAR INTO R
FINNS FOR
FINLAND TO WAIVE
DAMAGE CLAIM
SUPPORT
TEUTONS WILL
YOUNGEST I
Bolsheviki Prepare to C4
War" in Interests
- olution

(Summary of Russian situation
prepared by Associated Press.)
Feb. 7.-In spite of the fact that
formal treaty of peace has been sig
by the central powers and the :
sheviki government of Russia, fi
ing continues at various fronts a:
the eastern front.. That Germany c
siders the conjunction she, forced L
me and Trotzky to sign as a "scra
paper" is evident by the annou:
ment thatathe Teutons have reac
I ambord, a town 68b miles from Pei
grad. This report, subsequent to
of the partial retirement of the G
mans does not lend encouragemen
the belief that further invasion
Russia has been abandoned.
Germany Lothi to Forego Conque
The text of the peace treaty sig
by Roumania, proves that the cen
powers are loath to forego any c
quest that they may make in Rui
One of the clauses of the- Rouman
treaty binds that country to assis
the transport of Teuton forces on t:
way to Odessa, the "grainary of I
sia."
Not only are the Teutons comme
ing again against the demoral
Slavs, but the Turks also are agg
sors in Asia Minor. Reports state t
the Turkish troops are operating n
Trebizond on the southern shore of
Black sea.
Peace Negotiated With Finland
Germany has negotiated a pe
treaty with the republic of Finland
which the latter agrees not to cede
territory, or grant territorial rig
without the consent of Germany, wb
in consideration for this concess
agrees to exert her influence to
cure recognition of the Finnish g
ernment from other nations.
claims for war costs or damages
waived and the Aland island wil
evacuated by the Finnish troops
will not again be fortified.
Coincident with the continued
vasion of Russia by the Teutons,
Bolshevik authorities have announ
that they will not permit the rev
tion to be bested and have exprei
the determination to continue a fi
ing "holy war." .American Amba
dor Francis has issued a statem
from Vologda warning the Russ
that a German victory means the
turn of monarchial conditions.

was
week.

rch 7.-Troops and
al Pershing's forces
o France on sched-
learned today on
ile figures may not
as stated positively
n requirements of
g met by the ship-
e immediate situa-
as described as sat-

valuable service in the army.
"As I read general war order No.
49, there is nothing in it preventing
the enlisted engineers from receivug
credit for training work in college.
In this President Hutchins agrees
with me. It should not take even a
second thought to decide the ques-
tion."
THIRD CUT TO BE MADE IN
TRY-OUTS FOR FRENCH PLAY

the

i the west-
nned more
ers here for

>ening
much

HEAT]

d to be the most
if Northern lights
bor was visible in

Several new candidates came out for nt evw or1, iioeevea
the second try-out of the Cercle Fran-
cais play. The following are asked to DETROIT REACHES
appear at the third try-out, which will CLIMAX OF CRIMES
take place at 7 o'clock tonight at the
Cercle rooms: Hans P. Anti rk sou, Detroit, March 7. -- Probably the
'20; J. A. Bonnet, '20P: Jacob Braude, worst 24 hours Detroit has experienc-
18; Floyd E. Buell, '19; W. L. Fink, ed in major crimes was climaxed to-
'21; Ashley Hatch, '20; A J Himel- night in the shooting and probable
hoch, '20; W. J. Kennick. '19; L. F. fatal wounding of William Hume, 55
Kuijala; M. E. McGowan 21; E. F. years old, manager of a gasoline ser-
Moore, '21; ?,. H. Seltzer, '20; Howard vice station on the west side..
S. Velleman, '21; C H Wilmot, '19; According to information, the police
Alfred W. Wilson, '21; Doris Ander- obtained from Hume, his assailant
son, Hoy , F. Fergus *n, '19; Dorothy was driven from the oil station in a
Gruss, '19' "ester M. Reed, '19; Hazel big limousine operated by a Negro#
S. Selby, '18; Katrina Schermerhorn, chauffeur. The occupant of the ma-
'21; Charlotte A. Smith, '20; Marjorie chine, a white man, stepped from a
C. Springer, '20; Marie Von Walt- car, and opening a door to the oil sta-;
hausen, Dorothy 'P. Williams, '20;' J. tion, shot Hume through the mouth."
H. Moore, '21. After taking $52 from the cash regis-
At the business meeting of the ter he leaped back into'the. automobile
Cercle, following the try-outs of can- and was driven rapidly away. Hume
didates for the play, th'e following was taken to a hospital where it was
were elected to membership: Doris said that he can. not recover.
Anderson, J. A. Bonnet, '20E; Jennie Three other men .are in hospitals'
E. Jacobs, '19D; Ethelyn F. Mullarky. as the result of encounters with hold-
up men during the last 24 hours.
Revoke Wheat Substitution Exceptions Numerous reports of -burglaries and
Washington, March 7.-All excep- hold-ups were received by the police
tions to the food administration rule during the day.
requiring the purchase of an equal
amount of substitutes with each pur- SENIOR GIRLS ARE URGED TO
chase of wheat flour were revoked to- ORDER CAPS AND GOWNS SOON
day because of the necessity of con- ----.
serving wheat for the allies. Senior girls mu'st order their caps'
and gowns at once. Mack and Co. are
Food Rioting Breaks Out in Christiana filling the contract and orders should
London, March 7.-Rioting today in be in before March 15 if gowns are to
Christiana, in consequence of which be ready before the first performance
many arrests were made is reported of the Junior girls' play on March 26.
in press dispatches reaching Copen- At a meeting last week it was de-
haran as forwarded by the Exchange cided that only Buster Brown collars,

Aland island is the la
group, called the Aland
located about midway t
eastern coast of Sweden a
ern coast of Finland. Th
portant Finnish port is A
WANT ENGINEERING S1
FOR FLOOD PREEN
Engineers are wanted
Snd permanent work in t
Dayton, Ohio, by the M
vancy committee, which I
the flood prevention wor
the Miami valley, accordi
received recently by Prof
of the Engineering colleg
A project, involving the
of millions of dollars and
tion of a number of ds
bankments is under way
repetition of the flood dis
overtook Dayton in 1913.

been ob-
northern
and past
been as

RED

If

and

Local Red C
knowledge of
of by a mem
who claimed t
discourteously
basket of ma
some used, si
child refugees
1-- +h ++V^-

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