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October 11, 1917 - Image 3

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1917-10-11

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

PAGIM'

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Yostinen

Beat

i _

YOSTMEN NEARLY DEFEATED
BY KALAMAZOO NORMAL
VISITORS SCORE TWO TOUCH.
DOWNS IN LAST HALF OF
PLAY
Michigan nearly was defeated by a
normal school on 'her own field yes-
terday afternoon, when a Kalamazoo
Normal team with Mr. Berman as so-
loist, ran up 13 points to the Wol-
verines' 17, and for six minutes were
in the lead by three points.
Berman, quarter and later halfback
for the visitors, was the man who
nearly carried off the Michigan scalp.
Tad Wieman, backed by Rye and
Cohn, were the men ,who kept the
scalp where nature intended that it
should grow.
Hard luck descended on the Yost-
men without warning in the third
quarter, when Kazoo scored and Cliff
Sparks was laid out, all in the same
play.. Berman took the ball on the
Kalamazoo 35-yard line and emerged
from a scuffle headed toward the
Michigan left end. Then the future
school teacher began to surprise the
stands. Evading all tackles, he tore
around the Michigan end to a clear
field. The Michigan left end and left
tackle went after him to find that he
had a brand of speed that couldn't be
equaled. He downed the ball between
the Michigan goal posts-a run of 65
yards. Olsen kicked goal.
Sparks Receites Injury
In addition to the gloom cast by
the startling score, Michigan was
knocked to pieces mentally by Spark's
failure to arise after, the scoring play.
Cliff's knee had been wrenched again;
he was replaced by Genebach.
Twice in the next few minutes did
Berman threaten to repeat his score.
Each time he dodged through a de-
moralized Michigan line, past all op-
position except Genebach, who stopped
each threatened score by a sure tackle
when all the other Wolverines had
failed.

The second Normal score came early
in the last quarter, placing Michigan
three points behind. Berman is re-
sponsible for this tally also. He opened
the quarter by running 36 yards, after
which a 20-yard gain by Dunlap
placed the visitors where a perfect
forward pass from Olsen to Houston
enabled the latter to cross the Michi-
gan line. Olsen failed to kick goal,
leaving the score Michigan 10, Ka-
zoo 13.
Here the, famous Michigan come-
back, led by Tad Wieman, started
with a rush.
Wolverines Pull Comeback
Wieman, Cohn, and Rye started the
march down the field. Every play
added from four to six yards with-
out sign of stopping. A final rush of
six yards carried Tad over. .core:
Michigan, a16; Normal, 13. Wieman
kicked goal.
Thirst for blood was not appeased
in the Michigan team with scoring
once. Another march was started to
the Kazoo goal, which was stopped
by the.whistle on the 10-yard line.
Sparks played a brilliant game,
showing a dodging and diving ability
that rivaled the acrobatic line at a
circus. Time and again Cliff made
eight or 10-yard gains by plowing as
far as he could and then diving over
the man that tackled him, twice turn-
ing a complete somersault.
Dunlap, a husky negro, playing at
right half on the visiting team, shared
the glory with Berman. Dunlap
plowed through the Yost line in the
early part of the game, and started
some accurate forward passes that
gave big Normal gains. He easily out-
punted the Wolverines, also.
Wieman Starts Scoring
Wieman started the scoring for the
Wolverines by kicking a field goal
from the 25-yard line in the first quar-
ter. The half ended with the ball be-
longing to Michigan on the visitors'
10-yard line. Eleven first downs had
been made by the Wolverines in the
first half. Score: Michigan, 3; Ka-
S0
Dunlap kicked off to Sparks to start
the second half. , Cliff gained nine
yards. Michigan was penalized five
yards for offside. The penalty was
repeated on the next play. Rye gained
four yards. Wieman, Rye, and Sparks,
in turn, were stopped in their tracks.
Sparks punted to the Kazoo five-yard
line, where a fumble was recovered
by Culver. Wieman carried the ball
over. Score: Michigan, 10; Kazoo, 0.
Then came the play that will make.
Berman famous, bringing the score
to Michigan, 10; Normal, 7, after Olsen
kicked goal..
Berman opened the last quarter by
running 36-yards. Dunlap added 30
yards, and a pass from Olsen reached
Houston, who was free. Houston
crossed the line. Olsen failed to kick
goal. Score: Michigai., 10; Normal,
13.

Cohn.............L.H........ Dunlap S
Wieman..........F.B.......... Olsen s
Score by quarters: t
Michigan.............3 0 7 7-17 w
Kalamazoo Normal ... 0 0 7 7-14 n
Summaries w
Substitutions-Michigan: Cress for a
Goetz, Rye for Hanish, St. Clair for w
Cartwright, Hendershot for Cress,
Lindstrom for Fortune, Genebach for
Sparks, Goodsell for Lindstrom, Bar-O
nard for Rye. Kalamazoo Normal:t
Thomas for Angell, Cudmore for
Stockdale. s
Touchdowns-Wieman 2, Berman,
Houston. Goals kicked-Wieman 2, c
Olsen. Field goals-Wieman. I fe
Walter Kennedy (Chicago), referee. fo
Dalrimple, umpire. Time-First half,
7 1-2 minute quarters; second half, w
10-minute quarters. b
r
YearlingsS art
Schedule Saturday
This year's All-fresh football team
will open the 1917 season next Sat-
urday when they meet the Michigan
State Normal school here in a pre-
liminary to the Varsity game.
Ypsilanti will bring the strongest
aggregation that has been assembled
at the "teachers' college" in years.
Practically all the men on the first
team are veterans. But four men were
lost through graduation last June, and' _
the war apparently did the normalc
school very little damae. Coach
Mitchell predicts a very tough strug-
gle. He expects the game to be close,
but declares that his men will have C
to put up the best football that they
can if they expect to come out at the
long end of the score.
From present indications it appears
that Fletcher and Boville will start at
ends. Boville is a former Detroit Cen-
tral star and is expected to be one
of the team's most dependable men.
Fletcher on the other extremity hails
also from Detroit Central, and has
played along side of Boville before.
At tackles Peacock and Culver seem
to be showing a good brand of foot-
ball and will probably play these po-
sitions next Saturday.
Lent and Timchac are likely to start
as guards. Center will be held down
by Clippert and quarter by Ursche.
For the other backfield positions
Coach Mitchell has Reed and Bailey
as halfbacks and Uscher at fullback. I
GIANTS CAPTURE THIRD r
GAME IN WORL'S SERIES
NEW YORKERS SCORE IN FOURTH
.CHAPTER ENOUGH TO
WIN CONTEST
Polo Grounds, NeW York, Oct. 10.-
The New York Giants defeated the
White Sox in the third game of the
world series here today by a score
of 2 to 0.
Polo Grounds, New York, Oct. 10.-
The New York Giants having ex-
ecuted as they declare, a strategic
retirement to prepared positions on
the Polo grounds, found themselves
today confronting the Chicago White
Jessie Dicken Hosum, teacher of.
voice. 1327 Forest Court. Phone
1642-M.-Adv.;

Lazoo
ox in the third game of the world
eries. The champions of the Na-
lonal league had their backs to the
wall to ward off the crushing pen-
ant winners of the American league,
who have captured two straight games
nd need only to annex two more to
in the honors of the series.
35,000 See Game
An early turnstile account indicated
>ver 35,000 persons had jammed into
he wooden stands of the stadium.
"We willP try and make it four
traight," said Manager Rowland.
Manager McGraw realized the handi-
ap his club was under, and had a
ew tart things to say to his men be-
ore the contest.
A threatening morning cleared to-
ard game time, but a wintry wind
lew over the field. The diamond was
eported in good shape.

17-I
The Giants received a big
when they came on the field.
The White Sox put in a stiff
tice and tested the range of the
The fielding practice of theC
was sharp and brilliant and br
cheers from the thousands i
stands.
Before the players took the
they gathered around the plate
an American flag was present
Corporal Hank Gowdy, who is n
the national guard.
(Continued on page four)
Estimates gladly given on p
.ing, .paper hanging, tinting or
kind of first class decorating.
Major & Co.-Adv.
Dancing from 9 to 12. Every
urday night at Armory.-A v.

l
'f

.and.
Laundry Bills
Get our p ric es on students'
soft wash
No mo re w orn out shir ts
around neck bands by rough
We smooth inside and outside
Saeges e cnto u

QUALITY
FIRST

hand
prae
field.
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nought
n the
field,
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ow in
paint-
any
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-
*-
1I
Il..

L IISMK 114, NY
< 4
I
i
i
i
c u fli c 1,

MAKES
ECCORDS
Exclusively.
for the

We darn your socks,

1

sew on

That's why we sell

Hart Schaffner
& Marx
clothes, for they're guaran-
teed all wool.
As for style-you won't
find anything later. They
have all the popular varia-
tions of belts and double
breasteds that are being worn

From then on the game was
Michigan's, with Wieman adding
touchdown that saved everything.
Linen,

all
the

buttons and do all mending
FREE
All goods washed in soft water
Liberty and Fifth Ave.
Phones 2076-2077
OUR WAGON WILL CALL PROMPTLY

Michigan. Kalamazoo.
Goetz ..........L.N.. .. 0. .. Houston
Culver..........L.T......... Chapel
Boyd...........L.G.....Stockdale
Goodsell..........C....:.... Johnson
Fortune:.......R.G.........Miller
Weske........ .......Allen (C.)
Cartwright......R.E........ Millar
Sparks.........4......... Berman
Hanish.........R.H........Angell

Victor-
Victrola
Hear the
following
Numbers
64669.
74500
74509
74510
74511
74512
74499
74522
74532
74536
AT THE

by good dressers.

Ask for

Varsity Fifty-Five
in suits, and
Varsity
Six Hundred
in overcoats. See the trench
models.
Also agency for Knox
Hats and Manhattan Shirts.
Reule-Conlin-
Fiegel Co.
The big store at the south-
east corner Main and Wash-

..rill

.III

A

II IIU EIIIII hII Ihiiititiii ii,*** . . . . .

I

I

PASSING IT ON
TO THE ULTIMATE CONSUMER
Prices on everything have gone way out of sight but we did not raise them, we merely take them
s they come and pass them on to you. A . This is your war just as it is our war, and we are
doing our part without a murmur.
HE RENELLEN HOSPICE
A PLACE OF DISTINCTIVE SERVICE
Is not profiting under present conditions -A0 AWe pay market prices for the best the mar-
ket has to offer . t $ When we find our people do not want or cannot afford certain things
to which they havo been accustomed, we cut those things off our menus.
My job is to find out what you want as shown by our receipts, and we change front
as often as we find that you do not want what we thought you would-----But we
will always serve the best that your money will buy.

3;zlos

a,,,, d,,

-downtown.

-t.' rt ________________________
HL ~- -

Corner Maynard
and William Streets

NI

w IMPIUML, Ak

AA .Vmmmm... ,

I lddwmmm

40 AMOL Aw

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