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March 01, 1918 - Image 1

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The Michigan Daily, 1918-03-01

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THE WEATHER 1
PARTLY CLOUDY AND
WARMER

ian

xtt

ASSOCIATED
PRESS
DAY AND NIGHT WIRE
SEREVICEC
PRITCE THREE CENTS

VOL. XXVIII. No. 103.

ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN, FRIDAY, 1IARCH 1, 1918.

V. S. WILL DECIDE
ONf FIHTING HUN
IN EAST SIBERIA
MAY ALLY WITh JAPAN TO SAVE
RUSSIAN PORT FROM
GERMANS
REGENT DEVELOPMENTS
TO SPEED UP DECISION
Believe Japan Cannot Be Restrained
From Taking Quick Ac-
tion
Washington, Feb. 28.-An early de-
cision probably will be reached on
the momentous question as to wheth-
er America and the entente allies
shall join Japan in a campaign in
eastern Siberia to counteract possible
German activities in that quarter and
save the great supplies of military
stores accumulated at Vladivostok and
interior points on the Siberian rail-
way.
It has been understood that. this de-
cision might await the arrival in
Washington of the newly appointed
Japanese ambassador to the United
States but it was said tonight that re-
cent developments including increased
pressure from entente sources very.
likely would cause a more speedy de-
termination of the question.
Indications that Japan cannot much
longer be restrained from taking some
action in Siberia are causing serious
consideration of the Japanese invita-..
.tion to the entente allies and Amer-
ica to participate in a campaign in
Siberia, .
FACULTY CONCERT
FEATURES SOLOIST
Under the direction of Mr. Samuel
P. Lockwood the University Symphony
orchestra with Mr. N. D. Falcone, clar-
inet soloist, played in Hill auditorium
yesterday afternoon.'
Mr. Falcone, shows a perfection of
technique and original interpretation
in his playing. His tones are clear,?
true and melodious.
The program' was interesting and
showed excellent effects of shading
and phrasing. The first number on
the program, "Mid-summer Nights
Dream," overture, op. 21, by Mendels-3
sohn, is a tone picture of sprightly
woodland dances. Baerman has ap-
propriated Beethoven's theme of theF
second movement of the "Kreutzer"
sonata and incorporated it in the1
introduction to his "Dream." The1
quaint and vivacious theme in this1
number is carried by the 'Piite, the or-1
chestra acting as an obligato accom-a
paniment. The concluding numbers
on the program from "Nell Gwyn"
ranged from the rhythemical "Coun-
try dance" to the brilliant dance of the
"Merrymakers."
WOMEN NAMED TO TAKE PART
IN GROUP DANCES TONIGHT
The names of the women who will;
take part in the group dances to be,
given at the cotillion tonight have
been announced as follows: Mabel
Kerley, grad., Ella Rasmusson, '19,
Laura Daniels, '19, Dorothy W iliams,1
'20, Jeannette Sudaw, '20, and Mina
Winslow, grad.
The committees for the Athletic

banquet at 6 o'clock are, tickets, Ma-
rie Macaulay, '18, chairman; decora-
tion, Phyllis Egglestone, '19, chair-,
man; supper, Laura Peacock, '20, and.
Lucile Duff, '19.
Junior Engineers Elect Officers
At the junior engineer elections held1
yesterday, C. T. Van Dusen was elect-.
ed president of the class, to fill the1
place formerly occupied by J. R. St.
Clair, now in the service. W. C. Bab-
bitt was chosen secretary to succeed
Clifford Sparks, and C. B. Campbell,
was elected junior engineer student;
councilman.
Russkl Kruzhok Will Meet Saturday
Russki Kruzhok will hold its second
meeting at 3:30 o'clock Saturday aft-
ernoon at Barbour gymnasium. Prof.
Alexander Ziwet, of the engineering
college, and Prof. Clarence Meader9
will address the meeting. A liter "y
and musical program will be given
and officers for the circle will be

WAR STAMP SALES
REACH $1,000 DAILY
There has been a tremendous in-
crease in the sale of Thrift stamps as
a result of the recent Thrift and War
Savings stamp .campaign by the Ann
Arbor school children, according to
Postmaster Horatio J. Abbott. The
daily output from the post office now
amounts to approximately $1,000.
Wednesday the sales ran to more than
$1,200, and on the day previous to that
to more than $1,600.
Mr. Abbott claims that the amount
now being sold is due to the fact that
the school children n Washington's
birthday, opened up accounts that
people have continued.
The success of the sale of these
stamps is largely due to the numer-
ous agencies that have been establish-
ed in stores and offices about the city.
Although the local committee started
out with the idea of establishing only
60 agencies in various parts of the
city, the list in the possession of Mr.
Abbott show that already 130 agencies
have been established. Stamps may
now be obtained in all business houses,
offices, and in various departments of
the university.
W1bILSON TELLS STUDENTS
TO REMA ININ SCHOOL.
EDUCATED MEN NEEDED FOR
RECONSTRUCTION WORK
AFTER WAR
Michigan representatives are at-
tending the Education Publishers, an
auxiliary of the National Education
association, now in session at Atlan-
tic City, discussing the status of uni-
versity students desirous of enlisting
before called by the draft. Dean Mor-
timer E. Cooley, and Professors A. S.
Whitney and G. E. Myers, who have
been sent by the University, will re-
turn in a few days to make their re-
ports.
Dean Cooley has in his possession a
letter from President Wilson to the
effect that university students should
stay in school until called for service,
the reasonr-being that men trained
along general and special lines will
be needed for reconstruction work
after peace is declared
Enlistments Not Favored
Philander P. Claxton, United States
commissioner of education, in address-
ing the body Wednesday declared that
the government was not in favor of
enlistments from universities, colleges
and other institutions.
"The sentiment of the administra-
tion, approved by the council of nma-
tional defense," he said, "is that at-
tendance and educational standards
be kept normal. The colleges and
universities abroad are empty. Our
institutions are the only ones in the
world filled to anything like normal."
PINERO'S "THE AMAZONS,"
TO BE MASQUES' PRODUCTION
"The Amazons," a three-act play by
Pinero, will be presented by Masques,
April 26, under the direction of Prof.
J. Raleigh Nelson. "With women
crowding into men's places in indus-
try, with college women invading
even the Michigan Union opera, noth-
ing could be more timely," said Prof.
Nelson, "than this whimsical and fan-
tastic little play of the 'mannish wo-
man' idea."

The play enjoyed great popularity
on the professional stage. It ran for
111 performances in London at its
first production and for over two
years in New York as one of Daniel
Frohman's most popular productions.
In the last two years "Billie" Burke
and Marguerite Clark have starred in
the play.
The try-outs for the "Amazons" will
be held from 3:30 to 5:00 o'clock next
Monday and Tuesday, March 4 and 5,
in Sarah Caswell Angell hall, and are
open to all women of the University.
The cast calls for 11 parts, including
a variety of characters.
Bryan Refused Hearing at Toronto
Toronto, Feb. 28.-William Jen-
nings Bryan was refused a hearing
when he appeared at a hall here to-
night to address a prohibition meet-
ing under the auspices of the Domin-
ion alliance. .Returned soldiers caus-
ed the disturbance by shouting var-
ious epithets. "What about the Lusi-

HOUSE O..S .S1
CONTROLOF ROADS
Bill howv Gos to Conference for f inl
Settlement of Differ-
ences
CHAMBER OF COMMERCE MAY
WARN GERMAN BUSINESS MEN
Danger of Excessive Armament Must
Be Removed From Germann
Nation
Washington, Feb. 28.-The bill to
govern federal operation of railroads
was passed by the house tonight by
a vote of 337 to 6.
The senate previously had passed
the bill which now goes to conference
for settlement of differences between
the two houses. The house bill pro-
vides for the return of the roads to
their owners two years after the war
ends instead of 18 months, as the sen-
ate draft proposes, and the house
measure vests final rate fixing author-
ity in the president, while the senate
would leave this power in the inter-
state commerce commission.
Washington, Feb. 28 --An over-
whelming vote in favor of a resolu-
tion warning German business men
that an economic combination will be
formed against Germany after the war
unless the danger of excessive arma-
ment is removed by making the Ger-
man government a responsible instru-
ment controlled by the people, was
announced tonight by the chamber of
commerce of the United States at the'
conclusion of a preliminary canvass'
of its organization members. The vote
as recorded to date is 1204 to 154l.
Washington, Feb. 2.---Orders were
issued today for the commandeering
for war purposes of all crude and n-
worked platinum in the hands of im-
porters, jobbers and wholesalers.
Increasing need for platinum in the
manufacture of munitions, acc rdig
to officials rendred this step impera-'
tive if the war program .was not to
receive a serious setback.
ALUMNAE WORK FOR
ANN ARBOR HOUSE
Alumnae of the University all over
the United States, headed by those of-
Detroit,. are conducting a campaign
this week to secure money which is
needed to finance Alumnae house, and
place it upon a paying basis.
Five thousand dollars must be turn-"
ed over to the Regents at once to
avoid a second mortgage on the pro-
perty, and the repairs and furnishings
on the building must also be paid for
out of this amount. Detroit Alumnae;
have taken charge of this work and.
under the leadership of Miss Claire'
Sanders of Detroit, are attempting to'
educate 4he 2,500 University men and
women in Detroit on the importance of
the project. Miss Sanders committee
includes Miss Lucy Elliott, Mrs. John
D. McKay, Miss Elizabeth Hayner,;
Miss Elizabeth Rohns, Miss Leona Bel-
ser, Miss Loise Robinson, and Miss
Isabel Watt. The movement was
started with a rush last Friday at the
College club tea, and many checks
have been received to date.
PROF. HOBBS GRANTED LEAVE
TO ENTER GOVERNMENT WORK
Prof. William H. Hobbs of the geol-
ogy department left Ann Arbor Wed-
nesday afternoon for New York city,

and is not expected to return for the
rest of the semester. He is on leave
of absence from the Univeraity and is.
engaged in government wor in New
York.
Expect Increase in Inlander Sales
The February Inlander made its
appearance on the campus yesterday
afternoon. While the sales so far are
somewhat below last month it is ex-
pected that the final report will show
a decided increase over previous
months.
Copies of the Inlander may be see
cured at Calkins' drug store, The Busy
Bee, Wahr's book store, and Sheehan's>
Scarlet Fever Epidemic at Carleton
Thirty Carleton College men have
died from scarlet fever. Coach Buck
has found. it necessary to convert the
gymnasium into a hospital, and has
called off practically all athletics for

SERVICE IBRAIES
NEEDIMORE BOOKS
Ann Arbor (rives 3,000 Volumes in Last
Campaign; Placed Second in
Michigan
TECHNICAL AND INSTRUCTION
WORKS ARE MOST DESIRED
Second National Effort Start's Soon
With Librarian V. W. Bishop
Asisting
Ann Arbor contributed more than
3,000 volumes during the first cam-
paign for books for the cantonment
libraries.
The local and University libraries
combined in collecting enough books
to give Ann Arbor the rank of second
in the state campaign. In proportion
to its population, this city collected
more books than any other in Mich-
igan.
Campaign Success
The first campaign, undertaken by
the American Library association, is
reported to have been a nation-wide
success: Thirty-four libraries have
been established in the various na-
tional army and national guard camps,
and enough volumes have been con-
tributed to give them a good start.
The association asked for $1,000,000;
this amount was greatly exceeded by
the contributions-.
Second Campaign Starts
Although much has been accomplish-
ed in this campaign, the Library as-
sociation feels that there is still a
great need for more books and more
financial aid. Volumes are therefore
being collected at the libraries as be-
fore. Money contributions are also
being called for. Fiction books will be
welcomed, but the greater demand is
for technical works, and instruction
books of various kinds. Engineering
works are especially desired.
A second campaign will begin soon,
and the week of March 18 to 23 has
been set aside as a time to put forth
special effort to get modern, up-to-
date books and money to buy technical
works. Publishers have agreed to
sell these works at one-half the list
prices. S. H. Rank, librarian of the
public library of Grand Rapids, will
manage the book campaign for Mich-
igan, and will be assisted by Mr. V. W.
Bishop, librarian of the University.
The national campaign will be under
the direction of Herbert Putnam, li-
brarian of congress.
JUNIOR GIRLS' PLAY
PRESENTED MARCH 20
March 26 and 30 are the dates de-
cided upon for the production of the
annual Junior Girls' play. The per-
formances will be held in Sarah Cas-
well Angell hall. The first one, on
Tuesday night, will be primarily for
the senior women. On Saturday aft-
ernoon the performance will be for
the campus at large.
Plans for a novel and distinctive
score are being contemplated and an
entirely new departure in this line is
promised.
The committee in charge of the mus-
is and lyrices expresses great satis-
faction over the material submitted.
Thirty-five cents is the admission
price at each performance and no
seats are reserved.
MEN MUST BE 21 YEARS OLD
TO ENTER ENGINEERS' CORPS
Students who are not 21 years old

will not be accepted for enlistment
in the engineering corps, according to
a bulletin issued yesterday from Sec-
retary Hopkin's office.
The bulletin states that the reason
for the existence of the reserve is to
exempt capable engineering students
from the draft, so that they might con-
tinue their courses. As men who were
under age on June 5, 1917 are not at
present forced to register, there would
be no need for these students to en-
list in the engineers' reserve,
Secretary Hopkins stated yesterday
that if congress should authorize reg-
istration of men as soon as they reach
the age of 21, these men will be al-
lowed to make application for the
corps.
Seniors Buy $ 00 Worth of Programs
More than $560 worth of programs
were ordered by seniors this week.
The orders were closed Wednesday

NAVAL RESERVISTS
CALLED TO VESSELS
Twenty members of the University
unit of the Naval auxiliary reserve
have been called for their first two
months of training. The men have re
ceived orders to report in New York
city.
Two months of training will be giv-
en the ien on coast-wise merchant
vessels. This will be their first step
in their efforts to receive third-class
quartermasters' cerificates.
The following men, none of whom
are enrolled here this semester, were
called: Homer R. Adrianse, ex-'18,
Charles M. Anderson, grad., (William
E. Brennen, Denman H. Cruttenden,
ex-'19, William G. Duncan, ex-'16, Les-
ter C. Doerr, grad., Verne G. Eaegle,
sx-'20P, Charles J. Eberhardt, Ches-
ter G. Fuss, ex-'19P, George K. Finzel,
ex-'spec. P., Victor W. Hughes, Laur-
ence D. Lark, ex-'19L, George P. Mac-
Nichol, ex-'21 John E. Marson, ex-
'19E, Roscoe J. Mason, ex-'18E, Roy
W. Nicholson, ex-'20, William C. Pres-
ley, William A. Quinlan, ex-'19, Justin
B. Stecker, ex-'18, Paul T. Smith, ex-
'19, Chesser M. Campbell, '20, of Sault
St. Marie, completed his enrollment
yesterday.
STEERE FARM WATER
fOR CITY IS POSIBIIlY
COUNCIL MAY G IE OTERS
CHANCE IN APRIL
ELECTION~
At the meeting of the city council
next Monday night it is almost certain
that some action will be taken in re-
gard to the local water situation.
Many aldermen wre agreed yesterday
that something must be done very
soon. In all probability the project
of bonding the city for $200,000 to pipe,
the water from the Steere farm to
the city will be presented to the vot-
ers the first part of April.
Want Filteration Plant
It is said that a number of people in
the city are not in favor of using the
water from the Steere farm, but are
desirous of installing a large fiteration
plant. The council, however, is prac-
tically unanimous in regard to the
Steere farm proposition, because the
cost of upkeep on a filteration plant is
very great, while that of utilizing the;
water from the Steere farm is prac-
tically nothing.
Steere Farm Water Pre
Prominent geologists on the campus
are in favor of getting the water sup-
ply from .the Steere farm, and say that
this source is very pure and also that
the supply is unlimited. With the sur-
rounding country controlled by the
city, they say that there is very little
chance of the wvatr becoming contain-
mfated. Mr. Ray Bassett, city forester,
also has a plan of planting a certain
kind of -vegetation on the farm to aid
in keeping the wvatr free from con-
tamination.
Expect Little Improvement
"We can expect no great improve-
ment in the water for a few days yet,"
said Mr. George S. Vandawarker,
manager of the city waterworks de-
partment. "By Saturday or Sunday, if
we do not have another severe storm,
the wvater should be settled enough to
be used freely again, as it is now be-
ginning to clear rapidly."
LaIENT.-COL. VAUGHIAN WILL

REPEAT LECTURE TODAY;
Lieut.-Col. Victor C. Vaughan will
repeat his lecture, which was given
yesterday on "In the Wake of the
Huns," at .4:15 o'clock this afternoon
in the Natural Science auditorium.
Four reels of motion pictures depict-
ing the destruction of the Huns in
France during their retreat will be
shown in connection with ie lecture.
No admission will be chargb4:
SENIORS TO ELECT STUDENT
COUNCIL REPRESENTATIVES
Senior class representatives to the
Student council to fill the vacancies
caused by two resignations and by the
expiration of the term of Jasper Reid
will be elected at the meeting to be
held at 3 o'clock this afternoon in
Room 101 Economics building.
Reports from the social, memorial,
and program and invitation commit-
tees will be submitted at this meet-

GEBRNY ORDERS
DRIVE ON RUSSIA
BE DISCONTINUED

ADVICES
PEACE

INDICATE FORMAA
TERMS HAVE BEEN
ACCEPTED

ANOTHER SPANISH
CABINET RESIGNS
Public Opinion in Spain Inflamed By
Sinking of. Ships By
Subs
(By Associated Press)
Feb. 28.-Germany's invasion of
Russia has slowed down. During the
last 24 hours there have been no re-
ports showing that the Teutons were
sweeping ahead towards Petrograd.
One explanation of this fact may be
found in an unofficial dispatch from
Petrograd which .states that the Ger-
man troops have received orders from
Berlin to advance no farther. This
would seem to indicate that the for-
mal peace terms have been accepted
.nd a treaty has been signed by the
Teutonic and Bolshevik delegates, as
the Germans refused to grant an ar-
mistice until peace had been nego-
tiated.
Russians to Fight
In spite of the German report that
"operations on the eastern front are
taking their normal course" and that
another Esthonian r.egiment had plac-
ed itself under the command of the
German staff, it is asserted in Petro-
grad that the Russian troops have re-
covered their fighting spirit and ..'tat
Cossacks, as well as mixed detach-
ments of soldiers, are on theit way to
the front.
Advices from Bucharest are to the
effect that ,the central powers have
communicated their peace terms to
King Ferdinand of Roumania who has
been granted a short period for con-
sideration.
Spanish Cabinet Falls
Another Spanish cabinet has fallen.
In some quarters it is reported to have
resulted because of the insistence of
the government in adhering to its pcd-
icy in strict neutrality toward bellig-
erents in the war. Public opinion
in Spain has become inflamed by the
sinking recently of five Spanish ves-
sels by German or Austrian submar-
;ines.
French and British troops have car-
ried out raiding operations against
the enemy. The French operations
were centered at Verdun and the Eng-
lish on each side of the Scarpe river.
In both cases prisoners were brought
back by the raiders. On the Italian
front there have been encounters by
small detachments and at points the
artillery engagements have been quite
lively.

Germany Orders
London, Feb. 28.-A Petrograd dis-
patch to the exchange telegraph com-
pany, under date .of Feb. 27, says it is
reported from Luga that the German
detachments which entered that town
a day or two ago, are leaving. The
Russians, moving to meet them have
turned toward the main railway and
occupied three small stations within
12 miles of Pskov. Large Russian de-
tachments are concentrating near
Pskov.
Direct information from Novo Selie
says that the Germans have received
orders to make no further advance,
and the German cavalry patrols which
appeared at Novo Selie have retired.
According to the Smolny institute,
the Bolshevik headquarters at Petro-
grad, fighting proceeded all Wednes-
day morning for possession of Pskov
and a message from Luga, says it is
definitely in Russian possession.

GEORGE BURKE TO SPEAK AT
UNIVERSITY LENTEN SERVICES
Mr. George Burke, '07L, former
district attorney and a lawyer of this
city will be the speaker at the Lenten
serviqes at 12:40 o'clock today in
the Bible Chair house, corner of.State
and Jefferssn streets, his subject
will be "The Temptation of the Short
Cut to Righteousness."
For the Saturday noon meeting
Frederick W. Stevens, head of the
state Red Cross, will talk on "The
Temptation of the Short Cut to Peace."
Attendance at the services this week
has been slightly larger than last

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