100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Download this Issue

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

February 22, 1918 - Image 1

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1918-02-22

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

THER
'ARMER

I

r Birt ina

ait

ASSOCIATI
PRESS
DAY AIND NIGHT
SE RVICE

ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN, FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 22, 1918.

PRICE TH

-,,---

I a fr

59 JUNIOR
SURVIVE

GIRLS
TRYOUTS

MITED
WEEKS

CLOSE

to be Informed

nn Arbor will
of flour and
hand is insuffi-
'iod. Two bak-
been forced to
are to follow

f Manchester, lo-I
a here, to shut
rbor City Milling
ed no'order to re-l
lls have their ele-
ur and feed, Ann

of it.

ers in the
t no longer
ther three
itions, butI

be expected among
in open. The con-
e supply can hold;
two weeks, unless
expected for four
ve and relieve the
Fill Orders
and gain by local'
vills as tile Barber
apire Milling com-
Milling company,

Rehearsals for this year's Junior
Girls' play began in earnest last night
in Sarah Caswell Angell hall, in Bar-
bour gymnasium. The following girls
have survived the final cut in 'the
chorus:
Mary Overman, Katherine Kilpat-
rick, Theresa Bennett, Mildred Kirk-
patrick, Irma Robinson, Marcia Pink-
erton, Catherine Coburn, Wiltrud
Hildner, Dorothy Chipman, Edna
Blake, Mildred Reindel, Elizabeth Con-
nor, Henrika Granblad, Mary Morse,
Olivia Demmon, Ruth Cann, Gertrude
Hasbrouck, Myrtle McCall, Ermine
Elms. Evadue Wright, Edith Duembl-]
ing, Lois Devereaux, Jane Duemling,
Laura Schriejplin, Marie Butler.
Frances MacDonald, Florence
Melcher, Emma Riggs, Olive Bertsch,
Hester Reed, Viola Robinson, Marion
Hatch, Charlotte Huebner, Eleanor
Hanley, Margaret Atkinson, Pricilla
Butler, Lois Tillett, Marie Bloon,
Phyllis Egglestone,' Doris Anderson,
Alleine L. O'Meara, Rosamond Rogers,
Eiladean Browne, Ruth Grow, Lois
Benallack, Dorothy Shields, Hazel
Ireman, Laura Daniels, Sarah Cang-
hey, Dorothy Thomas, Mildred Raun-
er, Groeso Gaines, Mary Charlotte
Thompson, Hope Keeler, Marian Hen-
derson, Carol Wadhams, Martha
Guernsey, Esther Vickery, Helen Tib-
bals.
PERSHING TO RECEIVE
MATERIALS FROM SPAN
GENERAL WILL GET BLANKETS,
MULES, IN EXCHANGE FOR
COTTON
Washington, Feb. 21.-An eonomic
agreement with Spain under which
General Pershing will get mules, army
blankets and other materials in that
country in return for cotton, oil and
other commodities from the United
States was signed today in Madrid.
The state department was so advised
tonight by Ambassador Willard.
The terms of the agreement could
not be learned tonight. Success of
the negotiations for exchange of com-
modities was welcome news to offici-
als here as the ability of General
Pershing to buy supplies in Spain will
save ship tonnage and enable the gen-
eral to build up his reserve stores
much more rapidly than probably oth-
erwise would have been possible.
SENATE DEFEATS
ROAD OWNERSHIP
Washington, Feb. 21.-Champions of
government ownership lost by an
overwhelming vote in the senate today
their fight for indefinite Federal
control of the railroads , after the
war. An amendment to the ad-
ministration railroad bill provid-
ing that government control
should continue until congress other-
wise ordered, were defeated 61 to 10.
Determinate contests over disputed
sections upset plans for passing the
bill today in both houses of congress
but the senate disposed of all im-
portant amendments and will reach a
final vote tomorrow. Discussion con-
tinued in the house where under an
agreement to close debate at 6 o'clock
tomorrow night the leaders expect to
pass the measure early next week.
, An amendment by Senator Cummins

of Iowa designed to reduce by about
$173,000,000 compensation to be paid
the railroads was defeated 53 to 23.
Chicago Sets Prices on Provisions
Chicago, Feb. 21.-Maximum prices
.on oats and provisions were set by
the Chicago board of trade today in
an effort to stop speculation in those
products. A resolution adopted by the
board of directors today fixes a max-
imum price for oats at 93 cents a
bushel.. Maximum prices for mess
pork were fixed at $50.55 a barrel.
Michigan Alunmni Give Tea in Detroit
All University women are invited to
'attend a tea given by the Alumnae as-
sociation this afternoon from 3 to 5
o'clock at the College club, 50 Peter-
boro street. Detroit where old tales

Prof. C. H. Van Tyne Given Leave,
Absence to Deliver Patriotic
Addresses

of
}1

Provision to establish a course in
internal combustion for engineering
students desirous of preparing them-
selves for governmental work in Lib-
erty motors, was made by the Board
of Regents at its monthly meeting yes-
terday. The action was the direct re-
sult of a petition signed by eight en-
gineering students. The course, which
has the approval of Dean Mortimer E.
Cooley and Professors H. C. Sadler
and H. C. Anderson, will be offered
during the summer session, provided
sufficient enough funds can be taken
from the engineering budget.
E. C. Pardon Reports Saving
E. C. Pardon, acting superintendent
of buildings. and grounds, reported
that the new ruling with regard to
closing all University buildings at 6
o'clock nights and all-day Sunday, has
saved more that $3,000 in seven
weeks. Under the topic of conserva-
tion came the report that the graduate
school's diplomas will be smaller in
the future, the reason being that suf-
ficient money can be saved in one
year, on the reduction in cost of the
material, to pay for the cost of a new
plate.
Prof. W. P. Wood Resigns
The resignation of Prof. W. P. Wood
of the chemical engineering depart-
ment, was accepted. Professor Wood
is going into the signal corps of the
army. Prof. U. B. Philip's leave of
absence was continued for the second
semester. Professor Philip is at pres-
ent doing Y. M. C. A. army work.
Because of the high cost of build-
ing, the Regents voted to defer the
erection of the Betsy Barbour house,
a residential for women, the gift of
Hon. Levi Barbour of Detroit, until
after the war.
Prof. Van Tyne on Leave of Absence
Prof. C. H. Van Tyne was given a
leave of absence for the second sem-
ester in order that he may deliver a
series of patriotic addresses through-
out the state. Professor Van Tyne is
to provide his own substitute.
The gift of $1,000 from H. Pierpont
Morgan, Jr., of New York City, to be
used toward defraying the expenses of
the illustrations in the last of the Un-
iversity Humanistic series, just off the
press, was recorded by the board. The
gifts of Mr. Morgan, Charles L. Freer,
and William Murphy of Detroit, have
made possible the publication of the
work.
GRADUATES FROM ORDNANCE
COURSE STILL IN ANN ARBOR
Men graduating from the ordnance
course last Saturday and ordered
back to be assigned yesterday to
positions in the service, are still in
the city. Captain E. T. White received
.a telegram yesterday afternoon order-
ing him to hold the men here until an
officer arrives from Chicago to ac-
company them to Augusta, Ga., where
'they are to be stationed.
The next course is not expected to
get under way until at least a week
from this Saturday, when it was
scheduled to start. The government
ordered the men to report at the de-
pot at Columbus, Ohio to receive
equipment. As conditions there are
very congested it is not thought the
men can get their supplies and ar-
rive here in much less than a week.
A flock of telegrams was received
from the men asking for information,
the order evidently having upset the
calculations of many.

RIEGENTS INSTAL
MOTORSCOURHSE
Engineering Students Granted Request
to Prepare for Work in Lib.
erty Motors
PROF. W. P. WOOD RESIGNS
TO ENTER SIGNAL CORPS

BOLSHEVIKI MAY COMMENCE
GUERILLA WARFARE ON HUN
French Sweep Enemy Out of Front
Line Trenches in Lorane
District
(By the Associated Press)
Feb. 21.-Like a great tidal wave
the German invasion of Russia rolls
forward. From Teal in Esthonia, the
Russian province, on the south shore
of the Gulf of Finland on the north to
Rovno, part of the famous triangular
fortresses which stood as a Muscovite
bulwark in the early days of the war,
and on the south, the Germans are
still advancing.
The formal message of surrender
sent to the German high command in
Russia after Berlin had refused to ac-
cept a capitulation by wireless, has-
not as yet been received and it is
probable there will be no halting of
the German invasion until Russia's
abject acceptance of peace terms is in
the hands of the German general staff,
and possibly not then.
Russia Can Fight
From the official reports coming
from Berlin it would appear that the
Russians were not destitute of sup-
plies with which to continue the war.
Dispatches received Thursday were
to the effect that the booty captured
at Rovno is enormous. Among the
items enumerated were 1,353 guns, 120
machine guns, 4,000 to 5,000 motor
cars and trains with about 1,000 car-
riages, many of which were laden
with grain; airplanes and war mate-
rial of an amount said to be "incalcu-
lable."
Should the German armies continue
to advance after the formal message
of surrender is delivered it is prob-
able that the Bolsheviki leaders will
order guerilla warfare against the in-
vaders.
French Win Victory
In the meantime, the entente allies
are not idle on the French front. The
attack made by the French in Lor-
aine Wednesday is reported to have
swept the Germans out of their first
line trenches over a wide front, but,
except for the statement that 525
prisoners were captured, there is
nothing definite as to the magnitude
of the blow delivered by the French.
Heavy artillery duels are going on
along the British and French fronts,
but except for the French advance
there have been no 'infantry engage-
ments of note.
The American front is apparently
quiet, as no news of operations of im-
portance has come through in the
past 24 hours.
TELEGRAPHY STUDENTS SHOW
PROGRESS IN NEW COURSE
Students who enrolled in the new
telegraph course being given by tle
Michigan School of Telegraphy estab-
lished in Nickels Arcade are now able
to receive from 15 to 20 words per
minute after less than three weeks'
work.
A new day class has been scheduled
for five days a week from 4 to 6
o'clock. More, than 10 have enrolled
in this section, and a few more will be
accepted if application is made with-
in a. few days. At present there are
three girls to every man in the classes.
The evening section has been filled to
capacity.
Mr. H. C. Baumgardner, local man-
ager of the Western Union, is in
charge of the school, and is assisted
by Mr. George Green. The system at
present is to rewire the sets daily so
that each individual may progress in
proportion to his ability without being
hindered by the rest of the class.

; least a month on the ground
he amount allowed them by the
iment has already been milled.
s expected .that a telegram will
be sent to Food Administrator
r informing him of the complex
Lion of the grains in Ann Arbor.
ers are unable, to procure any
grain for their cattle and hogs
igh vast quantities are stored
mills and consequently, must
heir wheat as the only means
aping them alive. At the same
bakeries are closing down be-
they are not able to purchase
Home Substitutes Urged
ause the demand of substitutes
heat is greater than the supply,
ecause they are more expensive
ard to get the adminstration now
the extensive use of home sub-
is. This plan is to save ap-
nately one half the week's sup-
Potatoes are strongly recom-
ad for such use until the sub-
s can be made more readily
bl. J
TO DESTROY CATTLE
REVEALED BY CONFESSIONE
Francisco, Feb. 21.-Alleged
of the Industrial Workers of
'orld to poison cattle and burnf
farm houses, and lumber mills
the Pacific coast were revealed
onfession today by Fritz Hager-
alias Charles Aisenbach, who
e had participated in some of
ctIons proposed, according to a
cent by officials of the fire pre-
m bureau of the Pacific coast.
:erinan said, according to offi-
that it was a common under-
ng that the alleged plot, to des-
attle and buildings was sup-
s by German money.
J. F. Shepard To Speak Sunday
f. J. F. Shepard of the psychol-.
.epartment will be the speaker
i meeting of the Students' so-
of +h TTnitain hurch at 6:30

director of the American school of
classified studies at Rome, which is
part of the American Academy there,
and is the official representative of the
Italian government.
The films of fighting above the
clouds has been furnished by the
Italian government. Dr. Clark also
has a collection of slides partly taken
by himself.
President Harry B. Hutchins speaks
highly in favor of Dr. Clark and urges
that the students of the university
avail themselves of the opportunity of
hearing him. The university is pay-
ing all the expenses for this lecture
and is charging no admission.
Dr. Clark has lectured here severalS
times before, and his lectures proved+
in every case to leave an Impression.i
PROFESSORMC LAUGHIN,
FORMER MEMBER OF HISTORY .
FACULTY COMES FROM CHI-
CAGO TO LECTURE
Prof. Andrew C. McLaughlin of the
University of Chicago, will deliver the
IWashington's Birthday address at 3
o'clock today in Hill auditorium un-
der the auspices of the history de-|
partment, the department of military|
science and tactics, and the Law
school.
The Medical school will not hold its
annual Founder's day celebration to-j
day in honor of the founders of the,
medical department for the first time,
in 20 years, but will join with the,
rest of the University to attend Pro-
fessor McLaughlin's lecture. This
lecture will constitute the program
for Washington's birthday as it has
been similarly cefbrated by the Uni-
versity for almost the 50 years.
Professor McLaughlin is head of the
history department at the University
of Chicago and a former member of
the history faculty of the University
of Michigan. The title of his address
will be: "England and America: Their
Common Traditions and Ideals." Last
year Professor McLaughlin also spoke
here under the auspices of the history
department.
During his visit here Professor Mc-
Laughlin will be the guest of Prof.
Earle W. Dow of the history depart-
ment, and Mrs. Dow. The members
of Alpha Delta Phi, of which fratern-
ity Professor McLaughlin i's a form-
er member, will entertain him at a
reception to be given in his honor
late this afternoon.
During his 20 years of teaching here
from 1886 to 1906, Professor McLaugh-
lin made Many friendships and left a
lasting impression upon the students
he taught. When he left the Uni-
versity to become the director of his-
torical studies in the Carnegie Insti-
tute at Washington in 1903, an appre-
ciation written by one of his former
students, part of which follows, ap-
peared in the Inlander for September,
1903.
"Prof. Andrew C. McLaughlin has
gone to Washington to be director of
historical studies for the Carnegie
Institution. A graIrate of the Uni-
Versity in the class of 1882 and the
law class of 1884, and a member of
the faculty since 1886, for almost 25
years he has taken an active part in
the life on our campus. During this
time he has gained many friends, tak-
en a high place among his associates,
won the respect and confidence of
scholars, and attached to him unnun-
bered students. All wish him now still

further weal."
Michigan Graduate Dies in Marquette
Marquette, Feb. 21.-Daniel Harvey
Ball of this city, dean of the upper
peninsula bar and one of the best
known and oldest practicing attorneys
in the state, died at the home of a
friend here today. Mr. Ball who was
born in New York state 82 years ago,
came to Michigan, when a child, the
family settling in Washtenaw county.
He was graduated from Albion college
and the law department of the Univer-
s it nf Michigan.

NO HALRT IN HUN'S
ADVANCE ON RUSSIA

Inability to Move Crops .
For Difference in 1P
Among Staples

HOOVER ADMINISTR
MOST CRITICAL IN (
HISTORY

Washington, Feb. 21.-The eas
part of the United States faces a :
shortage likely to continue for
next 60 days.
In making this disclosure ton
Food Administrator Hoover decla
that the situation is the most cri1
*in the country's history and tha
many of the large consuming areas
serve food stores are at the poin
exhaustion.
Blames Railroads
The whole blame is put by the
administrator on railroad conges
which he says has thrown the
administration far behind in its
gram of feeding the Allies. The
solution he sees is a greatly increa
rail movement of foodstuffs eve
the exclusion of much other a
merce.
Cereal exports to the Allies,
Hiover's statement sav. will be
000,000 bushels short by the en
February and meat shipments also
'far short of the amounts promise
Suspends Law
Inability to move the crops,
Hoover sets forth, has suspended
law of supply and demand and
created a price margin between
ducer and consumer wider tha
ever was before.
A large part of the corn . crop
about to spoil because it is not m
ing to terminals for drying. The
centage of soft corn in last y
crop, all of which must be dried
is to be saved, is the largest
known. Estimates place the am
as high as a billion bushels.
Potatoes Spoiling
Potatoes, the food administrator
lares, are spoiling in the produ
hands while consumers have -1
supplied only from summer gai
crops and stores carried over.
YOUNG WOMEN PRESENT TWO
PLAYLETS AT M. E. CIUJ
Two novel playlets will be pres
ed by the'Young Woman's Auxiliai
the Methodist church at 8 'clocl
night at the church, corner 'of E
and Washington streets.' The
will be entitled "The Love of .B
min and Mary Jane" and will coa
of shadow pictures. The second
depict "The Deestreek Skool."
The Hawaiian quartet will als
a feature of the evening's prog
An admission fee of 15 cents wil
charged.
The ;Wesleyan Guild of the M
dist church will be addressed at
o'clock Sunday evening by Presi
John W. Hoffman of 'Ohio Wesl
university.
WILSON'S POLICY SUPPORTED
BY AUSTRIAN SOCIAL]
Zurich, Feb. 21.-Socalist n
bers of the Austrian parliament i
passed a resolution calling upon
government to adopt the priuc:
enunciated by President Wilsor
the basis for a general peace and
ing that negotiations be begun as
as possible.

DR. CLARK SPEAKS
HERE NEXT MONDAY
Dr. Charles Upson Clark, former
professor of Latin at Yale university,
will deliver an illustrated lecture on
"Fighting Above the Clouds," at 8
o'clock Monday evening, Feb. 25, in
Hill auditorium. Dr. Clark is now

Germany Discloses No Evidence
Receipt of Russia's
Surrender.

of

u ,S Fl ACES F
FOR NEXT 60

DICTATOR
RAIL

BLA
CON

* * * * *

I

ANNOUNCEMENT

CREASE DANCE
will be informal. All tickets have been sold.
ADMISSION BY TICkET ONLY
Tonight - Michigan Union - 9 o'clock

*
*
*
*
*
*
*
*
*
*
*
*
*
*

CITY HEALTH OFFI(
CONDEMNS WATER
The presence of the c
in the city water has be
e'd by health commissio
A. Wessinger who advis
drinking water be bol
further notice. The ca'
trouble is due to the
Barton pool, from whic
gets most of its water

Back to Top

© 2021 Regents of the University of Michigan