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February 20, 1918 - Image 1

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1918-02-20

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' THE WEATHER
LOCAL SNOW FLURRIES
SOMEWHAT COLDER ;

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ASSOCIATED
PRESS
DAY AND NIGHT WIRE
SERVICE

VOL. XXVIII. No 96. ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN, WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 20, 1918. PRICE THREE CENT

PREMIER ADMITS
Us S. MADE FIRST
MOVE FOR UNITY
LLOYD GEORGE SAYS PRESIDENT
WANTED VIGOROUS
ACTION
NO SUPPORT, CAUSED
ITALIAN SITUATION
Officers Say If Allies Had Aided
Cadorna, War Would Be At
End
Washington, Feb. 19.-Frank admis-
sion by Premier Lloyd George today
that the convincing demand for uni-
fied military effort under a single di-
recting body had come from the Uni-
ted States, confirmed the impression
that has prevailed here since the pro-
posal to send the mission headed by
Colonel House to Europe first became
known. It was known unofficially at
that time that President Wilson had
become convinced that the allied
cause stood in grave danger, unless a
central body could be erected with
authority to initiate vigorous warfare,
based on a well digested plan of strat-
egy that covered all fronts.
Strike Decisively
The President was determined that
the United States should not waste
its strength in the war, but should
with the co-belligerents, wage an of-
fensive battle of the most vigorous
character.
The Italian disaster has been cited
as a striking example of what the
lack oficomplete co-operation among
the allies might bring about. When
the Austro-German drive into Italy
began, the Italian armies were threat-
ening the very heart of the whole Ger-
man military fabric.
Received No Support
The mighty German defenses on the
west front were threatened from the
rear, for Austria was crumbling un-
der the punishment administered by
the forces of General Cadorna. There
are officers here who believe that the
war would have been virtually over
now had Cadorna's great effort been
made with the' full support of the
British and French behind it. Fail-
ing that, it was swept back and the
enemy given the best military posi-
tion he had occupied since the defeat
of his drive at Paris in 1914.
ONLY 3 DEPENDENTS
ASK RED CROSS AID
Three women, one a Camp Custer
dependent and two whose husbands
are enlisted in the Canadian army,
constitute the only persons in Ann
Arbor who have as yet been forced
to ask the Red Cross for aid. Numer-
ous instances, however, have arisen
where women have borrowed small
sums from the Red Cross . owing to
the delay of payment from the govern-
ment.
All three cases have resulted from
attacks of illness. Two of the women
have children and this sudden attack
placed them in dire circumstances.
The other woman is very frail and
cannot depend on working for a live-
lihood.
On the whole the local soldier de-
pendents are not suffering any dis-

comfort. The Red Cross aims to care
for all those whose allowance is be-
low their demands. An allowance of
$15 a month by the soldiers is in-
creased $20 by the government mak-
ing a total of $35 a month. In many
cases, where women have several chil-
dren to care for, the men have made
greater allotments, which in turn
have been similarly increased by the
government.

JUNIOR GIRLS PLAY
BY JENNIE JACOBS,'19
Work on the Junior girls' play, writ-
ten by Jennie Jacobs, '19, is showing
fine progress as a result of the almost
daily rehearsals in Sarah Caswell An-
gell hall.
The stellar roles. including Eva
Herzberg, '19, as leading lady, and
Kennetha Berry, '19, in the leading
male part, are ably supported by a
cast and chorus of real ability.
As has been the custom in former
years, the name of the production and
the character of the plot, are kept se-
cret until the initial performance,
which in the past has usually been
shortly before spring vacation.
WAR REGISTRATION FOR.
WOMEN IS EXPLAINED
REV. CRANE, NATIONAL DEFENSE
COUNCIL OFFICER, SPEAKS
AT MEETINGS
Rev. Caroline Bartlett Crane, chair-
man of the Women's committee, Coun-
cil of national defense in Michigan,
was the principal speaker at both the
morning and afternoon meetings held
yesterday in Barbour gymnasium to
explain the registration of women to
take place throughout the state be-
ginning April 6.
In the morning, Mrs. Crane outlined
the history and aims of the Women's
committee, insisting that the useful
civic activities of peace times must
not be altogether displaced by purely
war-time duties.
Discusses Community Survey
In the afternoon, she discussed the
survey of community needs that has
been going on for the past three
weeks as a preliminary measure to
the registration.
Miss Agnes E. Wells, acting dean
of women, talked in the morning con-
cerning the three branches of activi-
ties for which University women are
organizing, the Red Cross, food con-
servation, and patriotic education in
the state.
Women's Advance Sure
At the afternoon session, Dr. George
Myers, professor of industrial educa-
tion, stated that the entrance of wo-
men into numerous new branches of
industry was only emphasized by the
war, that it would continue to exist,
and that our colleges must develop a
professional school for women.
Dr. Herbert Emerson, who is to con-
duct a part of the classes in the new
food courses, presented the nature of
the lectures and talked on the re-
sponsibility of women to meet the
food problem, which, he believes, is
the biggest one before the country at
present.
Discuss Registration
Miss Wells read a paper by Mrs.
Francis King, dealing with women in
agriculture.
The meeting at night consisted of a
talk on the coming registration by
Mrs. Frederick B. Perkins of Ann Ar-
bor, and a report of the work in Illi-
nois by Mrs. Kate Wood Ray.
At 3 o'clock Miss Edith Blackman,
professor of foods and cookery in
Ypsilanti is to speak on "How to Meet
the Problem of Food Conservation."
* * * * * * * * * * * * *

* Fresh Lit Assembly Wednesday *
* With the consent of the de- *
* partments concerned, all fresh- *
* man classes in the literary col- *
* lege, meeting at 9 o'clock on *
* 'Wednesday morning, Feb. 20,*
* will be dismissed in order that *
* all freshmen may attend the *,
* Fresh Lit assembly to be .held *
* at that hour in the old audi- *
* torium of University hall. *<

NEW TREATY9ADS
3005000_TO DRAT
Documents Now Ready for Congress
Concerning U. S. and British
Subjects
CANADIANS IN AMERICA
LIABLE FOR U. S. ARMIES
Negotiations Started with France and
Other Nations for Similar
Purposes
Washington, Feb. 19.-Treaties be-
tween the United States and Great
Britian and the United States and
Canada to govern the applica-
tion of the, army draft to
citizens of each country residing in
the other, were sent to the senate to-
day by Secretary Lansing. They were
signed by Mr. Lansing and Earl Read-
ing, British high commissioner and
special ambassador to the United
States.
Under the treaties, the United
States may apply the draft law to
British subjects and Canadians living
in this country between the ages of 20
and 45 years, the British draft limits,
while Great Britian and Canada may
draft resident citizens of the United
States from 21 to 31 years. Similar
treaties are now being negotiated by
the state department with France and
other co-belligerent nations and prob-
ably will be ready for submission
soon.
By the enforcement of the treaty it
is expected more than 300,000 men in
this country will be liable for ser-
vice.
"Watson- This is
In deed Strange",
Another long mark of credit has
been added to the cause of wrist
watches, by reason of an episode oc-
curring in 1908.
In these dim dead' days beyond re-
call, some grasping youth made a col-
lection of watches from Waterman
gymnasium. After he stole the time-
pieces, like the Arab, he also stole
away, and so effectively that a 10
years' search for the dastardly thief
and the fruits of his crime l'ad prov-
ed futile.
Now word comes from the Buffalo
chief of police that one of the watch-
es, belonging to E. E. Waller, was
located yesterday in a pawnshop.
Some may argue that the thief had;
conceived a penchant for a new kind;
of jewelry, others, that conscious;
striken, he sought this indirect means,
of restitution. Again there might be
basis for the arguement that necessity
for those all-important "three grains
of corn" accounted for the watch's
appearance in the pawnshop. A more
thoughtful analysis of the situation,
however, would interpret said villian's
motive thusly: The possessor of 14
watches, and hence up to the minute,
the problem naturally resolves itself1
into a case of "off with the old and on
with the new," or into the pawnshop
with the 1908 model and on with the
wrist watch.
What has happened to the other 13,
time alone will tell.
DEAN AGNES WELLS To SPEAK
AT ALUIMM TEA IN DETROIT
Acting Dean of Women Agnes E.3
Wells, will speak on up-to-the-minute1
college doings, at a tea given by the

Association of Collegiate Alumnae
Friday afternoon at the College club
in Detroit. Miss Wells will speak par-
ticularly about Alumnae residence
hall which has lately been remodeled1
for a girls dormitory and is now ac-
commodating 16 girls.
Since Detroit is the home of more
than 600 University women a large
attendance is expected at the meet-
ing.

NO WHEAT GROUND
HERE;,U. S.ORDER
Local Mill Stops Machinery Complying
With Ruling From Offices of
Food Administration
TWO BAKERES CLOSE DOORS
BFCAUSE OF FLOUR SHORTAGE
Rye and Corn Bread Expected to Take
Place of White Article Within
Next Few Weeks
The Michigan Milling company of
Ann Arbor ceased yesterday to grind
wheat for an indefinite period, in com-
pliance with a telegram received yes-
terday noon from the western food
administration at Toledo, ordering an
immediate shut-down. One bakery
firm, the Greek bakery, closed its
doors Saturday, the Quality bakery
will close today, and grocers in this
city find themselves with little or 'no
stock of flour, as a result of the cut-
ting off of the sole supply for local
needs.
The receipt of 250 barrels of flour
by Sam Heusel, one of the city's bak-
ers, Monday, and its subsequent dis-
tribution among several other baker-
ies in want of it, has greatly helped
the situation for those few.
Will Use Substitutes
Cornmeal and rye will have to take
the place of flour until the Michigan
Milling company is permitted to grind
wheat again, and one baker has al-
ready asserted that bread will consist
of 100 per cent grain substitutes with-
in four weeks. The Michigan Milling
company has a large quantity of flour
piled up in their elevators, but are
not permitted to sell it under the or-
der.
Local bakers and grocers are de-
pendent upon the city mills for their
flour, except in the case of a few firms
who are obtaining wheat from mills
in Saline, where they are old custo-
Mers. The government has forbidden
any mill to open new accounts for the
sale of flour. The head of a large
grocery firm stated yesterday that he
had received no outside flour for two
months.
Claims Limit Overstepped
The telegram received from Toledo
ordering the suspension of the grind-
ing of flour says, in part: "To the
Michigan Milling company, Your
grinding has reached the limit pre-
scribed by the government, and we
ask you to kindly shut down imme-
diately. Failure to comply will con-
stitute a serious violation." Signed,
Food Administration, Milling Division.
Commenting on this, G. Frank All-
mendingV, '78E, secretary and treas-
urer of the Michigan Milling company,
denied that the limit of 75 per cent
allotted by the government had been
reached.
Rye and corn are being ground by
the city flour mills but Mr. Allmen-
dinger states that the output of grains
will perhaps be insufficient to supply
the entire city. He also says that the
feed supply in Ann Arbor and neigh-
boring towns for the raising of hogs
and cattle will become even more seri-
ous than the flour situation.
Consumption is Decreased
The intermixing of grains with- flour
in bread has resulted in a decrease of

the amount of loaves turned out and
a corresponding increase in cost of
manufacture. Conventions of bakers
were held yesterday in Lansing and
Detroit for the purpose of deciding
upon a proposed raise in price fox
bread, and Ann Arbor bakers will fol-
low Detroit's action in this matter.
Private hoarding of flour is re-
sponsible for much of the present
scarcity, according to one, grocer who
stated that his flour sales for January
doubled that of any previous month.

SCHOOL CHILDREN
WILL SELL STAMPS
"A Thrift stamp in every home" will
be the slogan of 400 school children
who will campaign Ann Arbor houses
on Washington's birthday in the in-
terests of the War Savings stamp cam-
paign being conducted in Washtenaw
county.
The salesmen, who will be well sup-'
plied with the Thrift stamps, or baby
Liberty bonds, will be picked from
the different schools of the city, by
Supt. Herbert M. Slauson. Fraternity
and sorority houses, and all rooming
houses on the campus will be visited
in the. campaign.
The different schools will vie with
each other in an effort to sell the most
stamps. A service~ flag of special de-
sign will be given to the school which
makes the largest percentage of sales.
A smaller flag will be given to the
leading room in each school
DETROIT CITY COUNCIL
WOULD DUST COUZNS
VOTE FAVORING RESOLUTIONS IS
19 TO 14; MARX NOT IN
FAVOR
Detroit, Feb. 19.-A resolution re-
questing Mayor Max to remove James
Couzens multi-milionaire police com-
missioner from office, was adopted by
the city council tonight. The vote
on the resolution was 19 to 14. The
resolution charges the commissioner
with inefficiency and responsibility
for the wave of crime that has swept
the city in the last few months.
Mr. Couzens was warmly defended
by Alderman Crane who declared that
the commissioner had inherited ex-
isting conditions and was not wholly
to blame.
Mayor Marx is not expected to take
any action on the resolution. He al-
ready has announced that he would
"back the commissioner to the fin-
ish."
WOMEN TO LEARN
HOW TO REGISTER
Preliminary courses for training in
the work of registering women
throughout the country for govern-
mental war service, will begin at 10
o'clock this morning in the reading
room of Barbour gymnasium. These;
courses are being given throughout
the country, and college women are
greatly in demand as efficient reg-
istrars in this work.
The course from 10 o'clock to 11
o'clock wil explain the process of
registration. From 11 o'clock till
noon practical work in this line will
be taken up, the students being re-
quired to conduct personal registra-
tions. The afternoon classes from 2
till 4 o'clock will be a repetition
of the morning's work. At 4 o'clock
however, there will be a class in,
criticism, which will deal with the ex-
amination and criticism of the cards
prepared in the previous classes.
These classes are open to all Univer-
sity women.
ORDNANCE COURSE MEN ARE
DUE HERE BEFORE SATURDAY
Routings and transportation for the
men enrolled in the ordnance train-
ing course starting next Saturday, are
supposed to have been mailed from'
Washington, and the men should ar-

rive here sometime before Saturday,
enlisted in the service and fully equip-
ped. Though the new arrangements
for handling the men, they are enlist-
ed by their local draft boards, and
routed by Washington to a supply de-
pot before reporting here.
The class that graduated last Sat-j
urday, which is now on leave until
Thursday, will probably be sent to
Augusta, Ga., in a body.

BOLSHEVIKI SIGN
PEACE PACT WITH
HUN- GOVERNMENT
GERMANS ADVANCING EASTWARD
INTO RUSSIAN
TERRITORY
LEADERS PROTEST
AGAINST ENEMY

Purpose Of Invaders May Be To
ture Provinces And Aid
Ukrainians

Cap.

(By Associated Press)
-Feb. 19.--The Russian Bolsheviki
government has capitulated and an-
nounced its readiness, although pro-
testingly, to sign a peace compact un-
der the hard terms imposed by Ger-
many.
Notwithstanding this fact, Teutonic
troops are advancing eastward into
Russia over a front of 400 miles, from
Riga in the north to Lutsk a scant
50 miles from the east Galacian bor-
der on' the south. Apparently thus
far the operation has met with no op-
position. The northern reaches of
the Dvina river have been crossed by
the enemy; the important railway
town of Dvinsk, whence roads run
northeastward to Petrograd and east-
ward to Smolensk has been captured,
and Lutsk has been entered without
the Russians attempting to stay the
foe.
Lenine and Trotzky Sign
The official announcement of the
capitulation was signed by Nikolai
Lenine and Leon Trotzky. It protests
against Germany attacking a country
which has declared the war at an
end and which is demobilizing its
armies on all fronts, but under the
cirsumstances it says the government
regards itself as forced formally to
declare its willingness "to sign a
peace upon the conditions which had,
been dictated by the delegates of the
quadruple alliance at Brest-Litovsk."
As yet there is no indication from
German sources concerning -the -full
intentions of the invaders but it har>
been assumed that in the north the
capture of the provinces of Livonia
and Esthonia is contemplated, ar.d
that in the south, in Little Russia,
aid is to be lent the Ukrainians in
stemming the tide of the Bolshevik
movement against them.
Russia In Chaos
Apparently all is still chaos in Rus-
sia with civil war in progress at vari-
ous points and the food situation
daily growing worse.
Behind the entente allies' lines in
France and Belgium the military
leaders, with their armies ready, are
expecting the Germans to launch their
much-talked-of offensive, but there.
still is no outward sign of its near
approach. Artillery duels and raid-
ing operations and intensive aerial
activity continue to feature the fight-
ing all along the front.
British Situation Better
The tense political situation 1,
Great Britain arising from the secre-
cy surrounding the recent supreme
war council at Versailles has bee
bridged. Premier Lloyd George a';-
nounced in the house of common -
that it had been decided to set up _t
central authority to co-ordinate the
strategy of the Allies and that the
plans submitted by the Americans,
"which put the case for the prese:t
proposal" was one of the allest do?'
uments ever submitted to a military
conference.
Three Cars Of Coal Are Rece vCi
Three carloads of mine run soft
coal have been received by the local
police department, and will be sold
for delivery today. This shipment will
aid the relief work being done by the
cflicers. The price has been set at
$3.75 per half ton.

U - d

E.

Glee & Mandolin Club Concert
80 Live Musicians Hill Auditorium

I

Tonight

35,c
including War Tax

4,

8:15 P. M., Eastern Time

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