100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Download this Issue

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

February 19, 1918 - Image 2

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1918-02-19

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

TUESDAY, FEBRUARY 19, 1918.

tr~itn Batty

-f

MEMBER ASSOCIATED PRESS
e Associated Press is exclusively entitled
eo use for republication of all news dis-
cs credited to it or not otherwise credit-
this paper and also the local news
hed herein.
icial newspaper at the University of
igan . Published every morning except
lay during the university year.
tered at the postoffice ,:.t Ann.Arbor as
d-class matter.
ces: Ann Arbor Press Building,
nes: Business, 960 ; Editorial, 2414.
mmunications not to exceed 3oo words
ngth, or notices of events will be pub-
Sin The Daily, at the discretion of the
r, if left at the office in the Ann Arbor
Bldg., or in the notice box in the west
bor of the general library, where the
es are collected at -:3e o'clock each
nig.
rt T. McDonald.......Managing Editor
hilip Emery.........Business Manager
Editor ..........C. S. Clark, fr.
Editor.... . .Herbert G. Wilson
:s Editor......James Schermerhorn, Jr.
raph Editor........Bruce A. Swaney
en's Editor-.......Mildred C. Mighell
ary Editor .........Margaret H. Cooley
Id Makinson......Advertising Manager
lsworth Robinson... Advertising Manager
E. Cholette.......Publication Manager
ard Wohi.........Circulation Manager
d R. Smith ........... Credit Manager

NIGHT EDITORS
11 C. Barnes C. M. Campbell1
Osius. Jr. W. R. Atlas
nce L. Roesqr Mark K. Ehlbert

REPORTERS
J R. McAlpine Paul A. Shinkman
. -. edin Horace E. Hunter
Willam W. Fox Rilla A. Nelson
lorothy . Patterson Philip Slomrovitz
Loise Irish Frances Broene
V. H, Riorden Ida E. Mines
ilorene M. Price Samuel Lampot
Vera Brown Edgar L. Rice
Gertrude Sergeant David B. Landis
K. rances Handibo
BUSINESS STAFF
Wm. A. Leitzinger Harry D. Hause
Earl H. Cress L. A. Storrer
Robert Settle Katherine Kilpatrick
Helen Christen Agnes Abele
Victria Adams George A. Cadwell, Jr.
C. (. Schmiedeskamp Frances H. Macdonald
Francis H. Case
TUESDAY, FEBRUARY 19, 1918.
Night Editor-Philip Slmovitz
Meeting of all news staff and try-
outs at 12:40 sharp in editorial rooms.
WHAT OF RUSSIA?
When the decision of Lenine to quit
the war, although he refused to sign
a treaty of peace with his Teuton ad-
versaries, was flashed across the
wires, it roused a storm of conster-
nation. Officials were frank in their
gloom; apprehension filled the minds
of all. And yet, looking back over
the developments of the past few days
who can say whether the action was
one of the worst examples of turn
coat diplomacy or a stroke of genius,
a masterpiece of statesmanship com-
parable only to the most brilliant
moves of Napoleon and Franklin.
Looking back over the tense mo-
ments of the past week,tthe latter
judgment seems by far the wiser.
Lenine, without warning, without
precedent, has brought about the fol-
lowing conditions:
He has satisfied the Russian people
that he was sincere in his efforts to
bring about a cessation of military
activities.
He has placed Germany squarely
between the horns of a most puzzling
dilemma. Either the Hertling govern-
ment must acknowledge the state of
peace and thereby tacitly agree to
the conditions of peace demanded by
Lefline and Trotzky before the Brest
Litovsk conferences were dissolved,
or he aust send an army into Russia
to hold the conquered. territory and
to attempt to whip the passive Rus-
sians into a state of submission.
Should such an attack be made,
Lenine will then be in position to say
to his people, "I have done my best.
The Germans refused the only kind
of peace that would be honorable and
just. Now, it is up to you. Your very
life, . youjr national existence is at
stake." And, if appealed to in such
fashion, there is little doubt that the
formerly faltering Slavs will turn in
all the fury of a hitherto peaceful
body aroused by the most despicable
acts of treachery and brutality and
will struggle gamely to force the Hun
invaders from their soil.
To this country the developments
of the Russian revolution have seemed
to be mere turmoil with no settlement
in sight, a state of turbulence that
was leading to no good conclusion.
We have been suspicious of the Bol-
sheviki program and of the men sup-
porting it. Possibly, however, our
suspicions were entirely the result
of the lack of power to comprehend,
Of the confusion due to a total dif-
ference in the trend of thought. At
the present writing it seems more
than likely that Russia, with her vast
resources, her mighty potentialities,
will finally rise victorious over the

untoward conditions that have held
her bound and ultimately will render
to the Allies the most material assist-
ance.
FORMAL OR INFORMAL?
The Glee and Mandolin clubs will
have the opportunity Wednesday
night of manifesting their adherence
or opposition to the recently inaugur-
,fted pracltaie of wearing informal
attire at campus entertainments.
This custom is a wholesome one
and thoroughly in keeping with other
war economy measures. Its success or
failure on the campus must necessari-
ly depend on the attitude with which
the representative organizations view
it. If the Glee and Mandolin clubs
adopt it and appear in informal clothes
it will be a forward step toward a still
more democratic and self-sacrificing
Michigan.
With the musical clubs lies the
power to support or oppose; the cam-
pus awaits their decision.
The Glee and Mandolin clubs plac-
ard their concert withi"80 live Michi-
gan men, all of which are stars."
The word "which," we suppose refers
to horses, cows, or possibly the
throats of the singers, and the instru-
ments upon which the mandolin club
play I
Hindenburg is rather crafty at that.
Perhaps he's sneaking out of Germany
for Paris before the inevitable crash.
But even being a pioneer has its draw-
backs.
"No punitive damages," says the
President. Payment for actual dam-
ages would keep the German nose to
the grindstone for some little time.
It would seem that the conflict be-
tween Dr. Garfield and the open shops'
has been won by the latter.
The fashion editors have never in-
timated that puttees enhanced the
beauty of shapeless calves.
At that we love the kaiser-love
him to death.
POPULAR ARTISTS
TO EXHIBIT HERE
Exhibitions of drawings by Joseph
Pennell and Albert Seaford will fea-
ture the art display which will be
opened at 2 o'clock Wednesday after-
noon in Alumni Memorial hall under
the auspices of the Ann Arbor Art
association.
Mr. Pennell has made numerous
drawings of New York, Chicago, and
San Francisco, and has just recently
sketched the various war industries
at work. These drawings have been
obtained for a period of two weeks
through the efforts of the Architec-
tural society of the University.
Mr. Seaford's contribution to the
exhibition consists of 20 original
drawings. He has been chosen to
sketch Boston for "The Cities Series."
In this series Mr. Pennell drew New
York, San Francisco, and Venice.
The drawings will be on exhibition
from 2 to 4 o'clock in the afternoons,
except on Sunday. Members of the
association are to be admitted free
of charge, while the admission fee
for non-members will be 10 cents.
Meabership cards, ' adm1tting 'the
bearer to all exhibitions and lectures,
may be obtained for 50 cents.
FORMER FRIEND OF KAISER
TO SPEAK HERE ON FEB. 26
""Prussian Memories," is the title of

a lecture to be given by Mr. Poultney
Bigelow gn Tuesday, Feb. 26. Mr.
Bigelow was an intimate friend of
Kaiser Wilhelm until 1896 and
his experiences in Germany previous
to the outbreak of the present war
has enabled him to speak thoroughly
on the subject.
Mr. Bigelow, while not on a regular
lecture tour, is scheduled to speak
twice in Buffalo before returning to
his home on the Hudson. The lecture
in Ann Arbor will be free.
Stylus Elects Jeannette Kiekintveld
Jeannette Kiekintveld, '18, has been
elected to membership of Stylus, the
'onorary literary society for women.
In its annual contest, open to all
undergraduate women, the society
offers a prize of $10 for the best short
story. All manuscripts must be in
by May 15, and can be left with Gladys
Vedder in the rhetoric library, room
155, Natural Science building.

I went into a Place to Eat
On Sunday
But an Anatomistc
Had beat me to It.
Cream of Tomato soup
Came on.;
"Red and White Corpuscles," the Anat.
murmured.-
Then drew nigh the mighty roast of
Beef.
"Back muscles dissection," It croon-
ed.
And I saw the Ice-Cream coming
Down the Aisle and I!
Got up and Walked out
Because
I didn't want to have to swear
Off on Ice-Cream
For the rest of My Cosmic
Existence.
Laden with well-worn books he ap-
proached the scowling salesman. He
hesitated, he faltered. He stuttered,
"Er-I would like to sell these books."
"A dollar-fifty," was on the lips of
the scowling salesman.
Reverently removing his hat, the
serious seeker after illumination re-
sumed, "I-er-desire a Holy Bible." An
expression of mingled admiration and
compassion blotted the scowl from
the mean salesman's map.
"Two dollars," he breathed.
"And now," said the one of sancti-
monious mien, "if you will give me a
sticker that I can print Semitics on,
I'll put it over the title." m s
Call for HomernHeath!!!
"Go up to the Union and get a
couple ofdesperadoes."- Line from
"The Sunny Side of Broadway."
There's something in the tintinna-
bulation of "Phormio," the name of
the Classical club play, which inex-
plicably reminds us of the Follies.
It isn't George's renowned incap-
acity for equivocation; it's the birth-
day, which puts him first in the hearts
of his countrymen.
ECONOMICS ESSAY PRIZES WON
BY UNIVERSITY INSTRUCTORS
The announcement of the prize win-
ners of the Economic essay contest
held by Messrs. Hart, Schaffner and
Marx of Chicago during 1917 states
that the first prize of one thousand
dollars was won by Edmund E. Lin-
coln, instructor in economics at Rad-
cliffe college, Mass. The essay was
entitled, "The Results of Municipal
Electric Lighting in Massachusetts."
The second prize of five hundred dol-
lars was awarded to Frank Knight,
instructor in political science at the
University of Chicago.
The Vegetable Market, 117 West
Washington St., Phone 2190-F3, has
just received fine fresh celery. Call
or phone at once before it is all gone.
It is very scarce now. Also have
other choice vegetables, fruits, eggs,
cheese, butter, etc.-Adv.

CARYATIDJ

Wyvern will not meet tonight be-
cause of junior play practice.
Dr. Eloise Walker,, 908 Monroe
street, and Mrs. R. W. Cowden, 1016
Olivia avenue, wil be at home to col-
lege women from 4 to 6 o'clock this
afternoon. Mrs. A. S. Whitney, 833
E. University avenue, will be at home
from 3:30 to 5:30 o'clock.
Prof. W. A. Frayer will speak on the
political phase of "The World Today"
at 4:15 o'clock this afternoon in Bar-
bour gymnasium.
The registration conference holds a
special meeting for college women at
3 o'clock this afternoon at Barbour
gymnasium.
Tickets for the cotillion of the de-
partment of physical education for
women may be secured at the office
of the dean of women.
Will the girl who took a silver thim-
ble by mistake frm the Union dressing
room please leave it at the Union?
Women desiring to enter the class
in military marching will be given an
opportunity toado so at the next meet-
ing of the class at 3 o'clock Wednes-
day afternoon.
Junior and sophomore women will
holdcan important mass meeting at 4
o'clock this afternoon in room 205,
Mason hall.
An important meeting for seniors
and freshmen will be held at 4 o'clock
tomorrow afternoon in Barbour gym-
nasium.

I

STUDENTS SUPPLIES
For All Departments

E

At

WAHR' S

t

UNIVERSITY BOOKSTORES

ARE YOU INTERESTED IN
TELEGRAPHY?
We can furnish you with Keys, Sounders, Buzzers,
Wire Batteries, Etc.
THE EBERBACH & SON COMPANY
200-204 E: Liberty Street
T EXTB1"'KS
New and Secondhand

SECOND
SEMESTER

..L-

And

Bought and Sold

Slater's Book Shop
Phone 430 336 S. State St.

There is always an opportunity to
Increase your business through Daily
advertising. Try it.-Adv.
Patronize Our Advertisers.-Ad".
IIIi

All girls willing to help
University women for war
will meet at 3 o'clock on'
and Wednesday afternoonsi
bour gymnasium.

register
service
Tuesday
in Bar-

All women interested in patriotic
education are urged to keep track of
all lectures given on the subject.
Pamphlets giving the schedule of
lectures will be posted in the Li-
brary and in the office of Acting Dean
Agnes E. Wells.
The course in playground will. meet
at 1 o'clock instead of 2 o'clock on
Wednesdays this semester.
PROF. MACKAVANAGH ACCEPTS
CATHOLIC COLLEGE POSITION
Professor Thomas J. MacKavanagh,
formerly of the electrical engineering,
department of the University, has re-
signed to accept a position as head
of the electrical engineering depart-
ment of the Catholic university of
America at Washington, D. C.
Mrs. MacKavanagh and children
will leave for Washington some time
during the summer.

Sale of
Hari Schaffner &
M arx Clothes'
Young Men's Models
in Overcoats and Suits
We are also holding our
semi-annual sale of the fa-
mous Manhattan Shirts.
Come in and look these over.
Suits and Overcoats
$32.50 and $35.00 Values at
$26.50
$28.00 and $30.00 Values at
$22.50
$26.00 and $25.00 Values at
$20.00
$20.00 and $22.00 Values at
$16.50
$16.00 and $18.00 Values at
$14.00
$15 Values at
$13.50
Manhattan Shirts
All $1.25 Values at
j98c
All $1.75 Values at
$1.35
All $2.50 Values at
$1.85
All $3.50 Values at
$2.85
All1$5.00 Values at
$3.85
All $1.50 Values at
$1.20
All $2.00 Values at
$1.65
All $3.00 Values at
$2.15
All $4.00 and $4.50 Values at
$3.15
All $6.00 Values at
$4.85

I

I

DETROIT UNITED LINES
Between Detroit, Ann Arbor and Jackson.
(Effective May 22, 1917)
Detroit Limited and Express Cars--7: 3 a
in., 8:1o a. in., and hourly to 710 p. in., 9:1.
t). n.
Kalamazoo Limited Cars--8:48 a. mn and
every two hours to 6:48 o. m.; to Lansing,
8:48 p. in.
Jackson Express Cars jocal sto- west of
Aim Arbor)- :48 a. m. and every two hours
to : p. :n.
Local Cars East Bound-6:35 a. ,m., 6:40
a. in., 7:05 a. mn. and every two hours to 7 :05
P. Al.. 8:~ .0 P.., 9:05 P. in., 10:50 p. M.
To Ypsilanti only, 9:20 a. in.. 9:5 a .,
2:05 :.:in., 6:o3 p.,in, 9:45 P. in, 11 :45 r' .in..
12:20 a. in.. x1:1o a. in.. 1:20 a. mn. ro 'aine,
change at Ypsilanti.
Local Cars West Bound-'6:o5 a. in., 7:48
a. in.. 10:20 V. im.. 12:2o a. 1n.
We have both the inclination and
the equipment to furnish the
best in banking service
The Ann Arbor Savings Dank
INCORPORATaD 1869
Capital and Surplus $ 500,000.00
Resources . . . $4,000,8.0,
Northwest Corner Main and
Huron Sweets
707 North University Avenue
STOP AT
338 MAYNARD
Lunches and Sodas
i-x TYPEWRITERS
For Sale and Rent
TYPEWRITINTG
Mimeographing
Fraternity and Social Stittionery
0. D. MORRILL
322 South State Street
IF IT'S ANYTHING
PHOTOGRAPHIC, ASK
SWAIN
113 East University

THURSDAY, FEB. 21,1918

I-

_.---_
... :
. ....

YOUr every Bank-
ing need fulfilled at
THI
Farmers & Mechanics Dank

I

101-105 So. Main

330 So. State St.
(Nickels Arcade)

I

p.
Do You Know that the
SUGAR BOWL
has one of the best equipped
Candy Stores in the state?
They have their own Refrigerating
System, and make their own Ice
Cream and Candies.
You are] invited to visit and in-
spect their plant... .
Phone 967 109 5. Main St.

We carry leads for all sizes of gold and silver pencils

Reule, Conlin, Fegel & CO;
Southwest Cor. Main and Washington
The Home of Hart Schaffner &
Marx Clothes.

r

a

BANQUET SERVICE

DINNER DANCES

E

FINEST EQUIPPED CAFE IN ANN ARBOR

Back to Top

© 2021 Regents of the University of Michigan