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February 19, 1918 - Image 1

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The Michigan Daily, 1918-02-19

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THE WEATHER ~L ~ f IigASCAE
RISING TEMPERATURE p J DAY AND NIGHT WIRE;
TODAYSERVICE
VOL. XXVIII. No. 95. ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN, TUESDAY, FEBRUARY 19, 1918. PRICE THREE CENTS

HUN FRCES PUSH
WAY INTO. RUSSIA1
a ti
PASS DYINA RIVER
CARRY OUT THREAT TO INVADE
IF BOLSHEYIKI REFUSE
TO MAKE PEACE
BOLSHEVIKI CAPTURE
KIEV, UKRAINE SEAT
Germans Gain Few French Trenches,
But Are Ejected with Loss
of Prisoners
(By Associated Press)
Feb. 18.-With Russia in the grip
of internal strife and her battle line
denuded of men as a result of the
peace declaration of the Bolsheviki,
Germany already has begun the car-
rying out of her threats of invasion

PROF. MC LAUGHLIN
TO LECTURE FRIDAY

AMERICANS STUDY
FRENCH ARTILRY

because of the failure of the Bolshe-
viki to sign a peace compact with
the central powers. A dispatch from
Berlin announces that German troops
have crossed the Dvina River.
Reports tmanating from Sweden
say that the Germans have begun
pushing forward their troops into
Russia's two remaining Baltic pro-
vinces, Esthonia and Livonia, the tak-
ing of which completely isolated Rus-
sia from the shores of the Baltic, and
gave the enemy in addition to the
port of Riga, the city of Reval situat-
ed on the Gulf of Finland, from where
they easily might operate against
Petrograd by seat,
Germans Placate Austria
Although Austria-Hungary had
shown dissatisfaction over the stand
that Germany has taken toward Rus-
sia, the dual monarchy evidently had
been placated by a German promise
that any German military activity will
be confined to northern Russia, and
that Austria-Hungary will be left to
deal with whatever other problems
may arise in the territory adjacent
to her borders.
Kiev Captured
Belated dispatches from Petrograd
tell of the capture of Kiev, the new
capital of Ukraine, by the Bolsheviki.
The fighting is described as having
been extremely sanguinary, 4,000 per-
sons having been killed aitd 7,000
wounded. Great destruction was
wrought in the town by shells and ex-
plosives dropped by aviators.
At Odessa another big battle has
been fought between the Bolsheviki
and thd Moderates, during which war-
ships in the harbor bombarded the city.
Polish legions at Minsk are declared
to have been badly defeated and put
to rout, while the Bolsheviki are re-
ported to have captured Tongorod on
the Black Sea, and Veronezh, capital
of the province of the same name.
Germans Attack at Champagne
On the battle front in France and
Flanders the operations continue of a
minor character except for artillery
duels on isolated sectors. Here and
there are raids of more than usual
violence, The only attack of import-
ance along the entire front has been
in Champagne. At this point the
Germans after heavy artillery prepar-
ation attacked and gained a footing in
French trenches. Later, however,
they were ejected, and in addition the
French took prisoners.
Twenty-seven persons were killed
and 41 injured in the air raids made
by the Germans on London Saturday
and Sunday nights.
Class Basketball Cap lains Named
Women's class basketball teams
have elected the following captains
for the 1918 season: Senior, Kather-
ine MacNaughton; junior, Jane Duem-.
ling; sophomore, Lucy Huffman;
freshman, Phyllis Wylie.
The first of the series of interclass
games will be played on March 5. s

Washington's Birthday Feb. 22
will be celebrated by the Universi-
ty with a lecture to be given in Hill
auditorium at 3 o'clock by Prof.
Andrew McLaughlin, now head of
the history department at the Uni-
versity of Chicago and former pro-
fessor of American history at the
University of Michigan. The subject
of his address will be "England and
America: Their Common Traditions
and Ideals."
Professor McLaughlin began his
career at the University of Michigan,
graduating from the literary -college
in 1882 and from the law school in
1885. After successively occupying
positions as instructor and assistant
professor in the history department
of the University during the years
1886 -1891 he became proest r 'f
American history in 1891, retaining
that position until 1906. In 1906,
Professor McLaughlin resigned from
the University of Michigan going
to the University of Chicago where
he has been professor of history and
head of that department ever since.
Professor McLaughlin has held
many positions of importance in the
historical field. He was director of
the Bureau of Historical Research of
the Carnegie Institution at Washington
during 1903-1905 and editor of the
American Historical Review from
1898-1914, also filling the position of
managing editor of that magizine from
1901-1905. He has issued many works,
including the life of Cass in the "Am-
erican Statesman Series" and the cur-
rent and revised edition of Cooley's
"Principles of Constitutional Law."
Some of his own books are "The His-
tory of Higher Education in Michigan",
"The Confederation and the Consti-
tution". "The Courts, the Constitu-
tion and Parties", and with Prof. A.
B. Hart of Harvard University he is
the co-editor o the Cyclopedia of
American Government.
The University of Michigan has
honored Professor McLaughlin by
conferring upon him the degree of
Master of Arts in 1896 and Doctor
of Laws in 1912. Recently Professor
McLaughlin served as president of
the American Historical association.
To luild Scenes
For Opera Here
Scenery for "Let's Go," will be
built and painted in the Majestic
theater, by courtesy of Manager James
Wanzeck. The work will be done un-
der the personal supervision of Hir-
am Cornell, assisted by William Sax-
ton. Mr. Cornell built all the scenery
for the Union operas until last year,
and the opera committee considers
itself fortunate in being able to re-
engage him.
Reed Bachman, '20, is the designer
of the winning poster for "Let's Go."
Norman H. Ibsen, ex-'18E, and Hunter
Griffith, '21, won second and third
places respectively. The prizes are
as follows: First, $10; second, two
tickets for the opera; and third, one
ticket.
Men's cast and chorus rehearsals
and tryouts will be held at 7:30 o'clock
this evening at the Union. Sections
of the book and music are ready, and
parts will be assigned tonight.
Women's chorus rehearsals will be
held at 4 o'clock this afternoon at
the School of Music,
Crease Dance Chaperones Announced
Chaperones for the Crease dance on
February 22 have been announced as
follows: Prof. Edwin C. Goddard and

Mrs. Goddard, Prof. Robert E. Bun-
ker and Mrs. Bunker, Prof. Ralph W.
Aigler and Mrs. Aigler, and Prof.'
Evans Holbrook. Sam G. Pickas, '18
chairman of the committee announced
yesterday that all the tickets for the
Crease dance had been sold.

McAllister, ex-'18, and Patterson
Ann Arbor Among Students
Enrolled in France.

ENLIST IN FOREIGN LEGION
IN ORDER TO ENTER SCHOOL
Work to Master Instructions Given in
French Language; Study With
3,000 Natives
Fontainebleau, France, January 30.
(Correspondence) Numerically in an
almost vanishing minority, though
standing out clearly and distinctly
among their three thousand fellow-
pupils by reason of their work, 23
young Americans are fast complet-
ing their courses in the French ar-
tillery school here.
All of them are graduates or have
been students at American colleges or
universities; all of them have seen
service with such organizations as
the American Ambulance or the. Red
Cross. More than one of them wear
the French war cross to attest to
what they have done in the war, yet
all of them have in a way re-
nounced their own country and gone
over to the service of France for the
duration of the war, because they have
not quite been able to pass the strenu-
bus American physical fitness tests,
and yet are so anxious to do something
for "the cause," that they could not
remain idle.
Enlist in Foreign Legion
With the exception of two or three,
all have had to- enlist in the famous
Foreign Legion in order to get into
the school at all, as a government
regulation put a stop to the original
ease with which Americans could
join the French artillery school.
The eagerness to serve which has
induced the 23 Americans-who range
from 18 to 23 in age-to enter French
service is reflected in the work they
are doing, which aceording to the
commander of the school is generally
of a very high order in spite of the
difficulties of absorbing instruction in
the French language.
Patriotic Americans
Their service for France has been
made them enthusiastically pro-
French. The list of American stu-
dents shows the widely scattered con-
stituency of the American contingency
at the school. Here it is, with only a
few of the men missing:
Harold L. Scott, Granville, Ohio;
William M. Barber, Toledo, 0; Cole-
man T. Clark, Westfield, N. J; Whit-
ney Warren, Jr., New York; Stanton
Garfield, Washington, D. C.; Philip
A. Rogers, Binghamton, New York;
Thomas F. McAllister, Grand Rapids,
Mich; William C. Towle, New York
City; C. Law Watkins, Rye, N. Y.;
John Clark, Cornelius Winant, Town-
send Martin, Winthrop Cortelyou and
Redmond Moreland, all from New
York, Gerard Genew, Boston; Wil-
1am Moreland, Pittsburgh; Edward
Phillips, New Haven, Conn.; G. W.;
Patterson, Ann Arbor, Mich.; and
Cohen, New York City.
(Continued on page 4)s
Graduate Announces Engagement
Announcement has been made of
the engagement of Irene Lichman.
'17, of Logan, Pa., to Andrew Schoen-s
berg of Philadelpha at the Delta Gam-
ma sorority Saturday night.3

of

COUNTY WOMEN
OPEN CONFERENCE
The program of the Washtenaw
County Conference of the Women's
Committee of National Defense, which
will be held here today and tomorrow,
will be opened at 10:30 o'clock this
morning in Barbour gymnasium with
the Rev. Caroline Bartlett Crane pre-
siding.
The program follows: Rev. Caroline
Bartlett Crane will speak on "The Or-
igin and Aims of the Women's Com-
mittee with Outline of State Depart-
ment Work," and Miss Agnes E. Wells
will give a three-minute talk on war
work to be done by University women
this semester.I
At 12 o'clock luncheon will be
served a la carte in the Y. W. C. A.
tea room at Barbour gymnasium. At
2 o'clock this afternoon Rev. Crane
will give an explanation of the local
needs to be made before registration.
Prof. George Myers will talk on "Wo-
men workers of the Women's Commit-
tion." Dr. Herbert W. Emerson will
lecture on "The Food Courses Pre-
scribed by Herbert Hoover."
At 10:30 o'clock tomorrow morning
there will be a school of instruction
for registrars, with detailed study of
the registration card, conducted by
Mrs. Perkins and Mrs. Ray, and at 2
o'clock there will be a class in in-
struction in registration, at the 'close1

1*
*
*
*
*
*
*
*

COSSACK
Petrograd,
to a report cu
dines leader
has committ
Kaledinesi
quarreled w
disappeared

GENERAL *
COMMITS SUICIDE *
Feb. 18-According *
urrent here Gen. Kale- *
of the Don providence *
ed .suicide. *
is reported to have *
ith Gen Alexieff and *
early in February. *

MICHIGAN SENDS MORE THAN 6,980
MEN TO SERVE COUNTRY1 STUDENTS
AND FACULTY ENLIST IN NUMBERS

Mlusic Clubs Hold
Final Rehearsal.
The final rehearsal before the Wed-
nesday concert of the combined Glee
and Mandolin clubs was held last
evening in Hill auditorium. The clubs
were at their best and promise to
make the concert a success.
Mr. Theodore Harrison, director of
the Glee club, states that his organ-
ization is better this year than any
club he has directed. Mr. Frank Tab-

of which the members of
register each other.

LITERARY COLLEGE HEADS LIST
WITH 950 STUDENTS AND
FACULTY
ALUMNI CONTRIBUTE
APPROXIMATELY 5,000
University Departments Represented
In Every Branch of Govern-
ment Service

the class willI

WOMEN TO GAIN CREDIT
IN WAR FOOD COURSES
CLASSED UNDER MILITARY
TRAINING: HOURS
A WEEK
Junior and senior women are to re-
ceive from two to three hours credit
for the war food courses to be in-
troduced into the curriculum at once.
At a meeting of the faculty held yes-
terday afternoon it was decided a,
a war measure to allow credit for the
food courses recommended by Her-
bert Hoover.
These courses come under the head
of Military Training and are listed
as F 1,- and F 2. Course F 1 consists
of three lectures which will be given
at 4 o'clock on Monday, Wednesday,
and Friday in room 203 T. H.
Miss Greenwood, Social Director at
Martha Cook building, will give the
Monday lecture each week, taking
as her general topic "Food and the
War". Dr. Herbert W. Emerson will
have charge of the Wednesday .and
Friday meetings, and his lecture will
be "The Fundamentals of Food and
Nutrition in Relation to the War."
Course F 2 is a laboratory course
open to 20 seniors, and it will be
elected only in connection with course
1. This laboratory course will be con-
ducted by Dr. Clifford C. Glover, and
will meet at 4 o'clock on Tuesdays and
Thursdays in the Chemistry building.
The first lecture will be given to-
morrow by Miss Greenwood, and all
girls wishing to elect this course must
sign up at the time in the lecture
room with Miss Wells. This course
may be added to the regular program
of study without special permission.
provided it does not bring the num-
ber of hours above 18. Special per-
mission must be obtained from the
Registrar before more than this num-
ber of hours may be elected.

er, director of the Mandolin club
voiced his opinion that the instru-
mental organization surpasses the us-
ual clubs. Mr. James Hamilton said
last night that he has never heard
such excellent harmony as was heard
at the rehearsal.
The Mandolin club has announced
that there will be a jazz octet made
up of men in the club, led by
Abraham J. Gornetzky, '19L. Robert
Berman, '19, will play a violin solo ac-
companied by the 25 members of the
Mandolin club. He has been an in-
structor of violin at the Ganapol
Conservatory of Music in Detroit,
and is well known in Ann Arbor. He
will also play the violin obligato for
the largo, "Trust in the Lord," to be
sung by the Glee club. There are 60
members in the latter club. A trio
will also be offered by the Mandolin
club, consisting of violin, organ, and
cello.
The Glee club will feature the Var-
sity quartet, and the usual Midnight
Sons' quartet, which will sing "bar-
ber shop" jazz music. Both quartets
are up to the usual standard. Robert
R. Dieterle, '18, will sing thes olo
part of the Glee club's "Old Virginny."
Tags bearing the inscription "35-
How Many," were distributed last
night to those selling tickets. Tick-
ets may also be purchas'-- Wahr's
Sheehan's, Grinnell Brothers', All-
mendinger's, the Delta, the Union, the
Busy Bee, the University Music house,
and the Arcade Florist. The time for
the concert has been set at 8:15 east-
ern time.
PROF. HARRY WARD TO SPEAK
ON "MASTERS OR SERVANTS"
Prof. Harry Ward of Boston uni-
versity, who has been giving a series
of lectures in Ann Arbor churches un-
der the auspices of the University
Students Christian association, will
give his last talk at 7 o'clock tonight
in the Congregational church. His
subject will be "Masters or Servants."
The dai.ly tw'enty-minut& Lenn
service will be observed at 12:35
o'clock today at the Bible Chair
house. The subject for the talk will
be "The Wilderness Temptation." All
students are invited.
Forbids Refugees Entering Petrograd;
Petrograd, Feb. 18.-Nikolai Lenine
the Bolsheviki premier, has issued an
edict forbidding war prisoners and
refugees from entering "starving Pet-
rograd",or any of the non-producing
sections of North Russia.

Michigan has sent more than 6,980
men to help the country in some
branch of the service. Approximately
5,000 alumni have been called to the
colors, according to a statement from
Wilfred B. Shaw, secretary of the Al-
umni association.
No accurate lists of the men now in
the different branches of the service
are available, due to the fact that the
various colleges have failed to turn
in a report. It is estimated that 131
faculty men and 1,851 students have
left the University to enter the army
and navy since war was declared. A
majority of these were volunteers, a.
though some were called by the draft.
In addition to the men already in
the service, there are several hundred
students, engineers, dentists, and med-
ics enlisted in the various reserve
corps. It is probable that these men
will be transferred to active duty
early in the spring, or immediate-
ly after the completion of their cour-
ses in the University.
The literary college heads the list
of the men fighting for the country
with 900 students and 65 faculty men;
the engineering college follows with
734 students and 25 faculty men; the
medical with five students and 28 fac-
ulty men; homoeopathical with five
students and eight faculty men. The
Dental college sent two of its profe:4-
sors to the aid of the country, while
the entire senior class, with the ex-
ception of four, volunteered last June
for duty in the dental corps.
Two of the Law school faculty and
154 law students have entered the
service. Also one member of the fac-
ulty of the College of Pharmacy and
17 students have gone.
PROF. F. N. SCOTT SPEAKS
AT RUSSKI KRUZHOK MEETING
Russki Kruzhok held its first open
meeting at Barbour gymnasium Sat-
urday afternoon, with a good at-
tendance of faculty members, stu-
dents, and townspeople.
Prof. Fred N. Scott, in setting forth
the purposes of the society, stated that
since Russia is claiming the atter-
tion of the civilized world we ought
to try to understand what is taking
place and its bearing on other na-
tions.
An interesting program was given,
consisting of translations of Russian
poems and short stories, and folk lore
music.
In accordance with the Russian
custom, tea was served during an in-
termission In the program.
LIBRARY TO BE CONTINUED
CLOSED DURING THIS WEEK
Reading rooms of the general lib-
rary will be closed at six o'clock
every night this week. Books may
be drawn out overnight after five
o'clock, but must be returned by eight
o'clock the next morning.
Many students have been complair-
ing about the early closing hour, as
their studying is done to a great extet
after supper. It has been proven.
however, that a great saving of. coal.
has been effected, -and the plan will
be continued throughout the week.

-

SKATING!!
Enjoy the best sport of the winter season at the
Friendship Fund Frolic
TONIGHT, FEB. 19
WEINBERG'S COLISEUM.
GIVEN BY RESIDENTS OF MARTHA COOK

L

20

Glee & Mandolin Club Concert
80 Live Musicians Hill Auditorium
8:15 P. M., Eastern Time

20

4,

35

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