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October 10, 1917 - Image 2

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Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1917-10-10

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

0

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

WEDNESDAY, 0

-----

MEMBER ASSOCIATED PRESS
Official newspaper at the University of
ichigan . Published every morning except
onday during the university year.
Entered at the postoffice at Ann Arbor as
cond-class matter.
Offices :Ann Arbor Press Building. Sub-
riptions: by carrier, $2.50; by mail, $3.
'ant ad stations: Quarry's; Students' Sup-
' Store; The Delta. Phones: Business, 960;
ditorial, 2414.
Communications not to exceed 300 words
length, or notices of events will be pub-
hed in The Daily, at the discretion of the
ditor, if left at the office in th4 Ann Arbor
ess Bldg.,or in the notice box in the west
rridor of the general library, where the
tices are collected at 7:30 o'clock each
Bening.

T. Mconald.... Managing Editor
p Emery........Business Manager

Harold Makinson'......Advertising Manager
Paul X. Cholette.....Publication Manager
Bernard Wohl........ Circulation Manager
Harold R. Smith.........Credit Manager
Wm. M. LeFevre.........Office Manager
T. Ellsworth Robinson..ubscription Manager
NIGHT EDITORS
Bruce A.Swaney James Schermerhor, Jr.
Harry Carey C. S. Clark, Jr.
Clarence L. Roeser
x REPORTERS
Albert E. Horne, Jr. Bruce Millar
Philip C. Pack Harry W. Weinerman
Denman H. Cruttenden Edgar L. Rice
Mildred C. Mighell Mark K. Ehlbert
Eugene Given
BUSINESS STAFF'
L. A. StrrerUOrville E. Gates
Win. A. Leitzinger Harry D. Hause
Dale H. Baad Lambert Hirsheimer
WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 10, 1917.
Night Editor--Herbert G. Wilson
HIGH PRICES AND EDUCATION
Prices today are on the wing. Each
new sunset and sunrise adds to the
money power placed upon products.
Money is cheap.
Can not students place a higher
value upon the product which each is
now seeking, and receive more from
the education they came to Michigan
to get?
When going to the classroom, make
up your mind to remember what the
instructor says. It should be valu-
able to you, otherwise the instructor's
efforts and your own are largely
wasted. If given references, look them
up. Do more than is asked of you,
more than you need to do to "get by"
the course.
This achieved, your next step is to
pick flaws. If the instructor is right,
don't be discouraged. You are de-
veloping originality. If Columbus had
accepted the theory that the world
was flat he would never have discov-
ered America. There is plenty of room
for more like him.
Index your knowledge. A smooth
smattering of it may be the proper
thing in the drawing room or at the
adance, but the world doesn't swallow
your dose unless you show them.
Once you have done these things
you will still find you still lack much.
You can keep on all during your life.
But you can pat your own intellectual
back in one respect. You have put
a new, higher value upon your own
product.
IN KEEPING WITH THE TIMES
Major Wilfred Wilson and others on
the campus are unanimous in de-
claring that the Star Spangled Banner
should be played by the band before
the start of each football game. For
one reason or another, America's na-
tional anthem was entirely forgotten
before the first game of the year.
The idea is an excellent one, and
should be caught up at once. The band
is not expected to be present on Fer-
ry field this afternoon, but will be at
the Mt. Union contest.
The greater part of the "Didya have
a good summer" handshaking being
over, don't forget to speak to a friend
of yours on the street.
A weak mind is like a microscope,
which magnifies trifling things, but
cannot receive great ones.
To be truthful now-after two days
of 7:30 classes don't you wish to ex-
press yourself alone and at length
about the person who started this
whole European trouble.
Our leading punster has informed us
that the allies seem to be ripping the
seat out of the war.

The uniform still attracts 'em. Any-
way that's the office gossip.
DEAN JORDAN GIVES
FRESH GIRLS RECEPTION
"Pilgrims' Progress," was revised
for the benefit of the girls of 1921
at the Junior advisors' supper Mon-
day night, immediately following Dean
Myra B. Jordan's reception.
The old allegory was made the
basis of a clever skit by Helen Os-
band, '19. Her heroine called "Chry-
salis," the typical- "new girl," fell
into many bloody adventures on the
Road to Knowledge, encountered the
horror of the Valley of the Shadow of
Death in her medical examination. She

met the typical "Michigan Man"' in
her finals.
On the reception line of the after-
noon were, Dean Myra B. Jordan, Mrs.
Harry B. Hutchins, Mrs. John R. Ef-
finger, Miss Sarah Hollands, Miss
Grace Greenwood, Miss Agnes Wells,
Miss Alice Evans, Miss Louise Potter,
Miss Marion Dawley, and Miss Marion
Wood.
After the dinner Anna MacMahon,
'19, chairman of the Junior advisor
committee, introduced the speakers.
Ada Arnold, '19, spoke briefly about
the Women's league; Emily Loman,
'19, the Girls' Glee club; Olive Wig-
gins, '19, the Y. W. C. A.; Jean Mc-
Lennan, '19, Red Cross work; Marcia
Pinkerton, '19, athletics, and Mildred
Morse, '19, dramatics.
l1omenI
Annual Y. W. C. A. banquet at 6
o'clock Saturday night, Oct. 13, at
Barbour gymnasium. Freshmen may
secure complimentary tickets at New-
berry hall before 5 o'clock Thursday
afternoon.
Mortarboard will meet at 8 o'clock
tonight at the Delta Gamma house.
Y. W. C. A. c inet meeting at
3:30 o'clock this afternoon at New-
berry hall. Vespers at 4:30 o'clock
will be led by Dean Myra B. Jordan
and all University womeni are urged
to attend. There will be special music
by Detroit musicians.
Masques will hold an important
meeting at 4:30 o'clock this after-
noon in Barbour gymnasium.
All gym clothing sold after today
will have an additional charge of five
cents a garment.
Locker assignments may be secur-
ed between 9:30 and 11:30 o'clock
Thursday, Friday, and Saturday and
between 1:30 and 2:30 o'clock Satur-
day.
Supper for the students' Liberty
loan committee will be served Friday
evening at the Union.
The vocational conference commit-
tee of the Women's league will meet
at 3 o'clock today at Barbour gymnas-
ium.
Rev. J. F. Emerick, 68, died at his
home in Ypsilanti Monday night. The
deceased leaves a wife and two daugh-
ters. Funeral services will be held
at 2 o'clock this afternoon.

CITY NEWS
William Snell of Detroit, injured in
an auto accident near Ypsilanti Sun-
lay, and who was operated on for a
fractured skull at the University hos-
pital yesterday, has but slight chance
of recovery, according to physicians.
The two boys who were with Snell
ait jo uolssnouoo uroxj upejns eae
brain, but will live.
Eighty-three hunting licenses were
issued Saturday by the County clerk.
Of these, 80 went to residents and the
'otherthree to aliens. Non-residents
of Washtenaw county are required to
pay $10 for a license.
The local draft board is continuing
the work of examining 20 conscripts
daily. A large number are filing claims
for exemption. Of the 20 men examin-
ed, five were physically unfit and the
other 15 claimed exemption.
Because three of his cows were
killed by a train on the Ann Arbor
railroad last June, William H. Kap-
pler, a farmer near here, was paid
$300 damages today, by the company
upon decision of the circuit court.
The board of directors of the Civic
association of Ann Arbor will meet
in the City Hall at 7:30 tonight.

I

Prescriptions and
House Drug Needs
Our Specialty
HOWEVER
we have many other items you
will need. So many you will
wish you had come earlier.

BOO

E

NEW AND SECON1D HAD
FOR ALL DEPARTMENY
Engineering Su pies
Drawing Inistrumn rs

I

H

QUARRY DRUG CO'S
PRESCRIPTION STORE
Cor. State and University
Phone 308

STATE MAIN
STREE T w AS TR.EET

t sl' °~1+ R h v n' a ,r'$ "; N, n .. e w Qom,
i

, _ ,

kassammmmam

. '

tions in a couple of months manufac-
turing drill chucks.
Captains of the different wards aid-
ing in the sale of the local Liberty
loan campaign will meet at luncheon
this noon in the Y. M. C. A. rooms.
The captains of the different wards
are as follows: First ward, Manley
Osgood; Second ward, Fred Heusel,
Jr.; Third ward, Martin Ryan; Fourth
ward, Fred Devine; Fifth ward,
George Spathelf; Sixth ward, Herbert
Tenny, and Seventh ward, Roscoe
Bonisteel.
M. W. Seabolt, youngest son of Mrs.
M. M. Seabolt of this city, ras recently
been appointed manager of the Bell
Telephone company of Niles, O. Mr.
Seabolt has had several years experi-
ence with the Bell company in Oil
City and other parts of Pennsylvania,
as well as in West Virginia.
H. D. Martin of this city, was one
of the 21 passengers who were in-
jured at 4 o'clock Monday afternoon
when an interburban car, westbound
on the Michigan railway, was wrecked
at Comstock. The air brakes failing
to work caused the car to leave the
rails.
Patronize Our Advertisers.-Adv.

ALAR COK
ELECTR I C UPP
ST A TE ST RE E T AKRDW A RIE

The third assistant postmaster gen-
eral of Washington, D. C., is now hear-
ing a case to determine whether or not
the alleged unpatriotic utterances of
Eugene Helber of this city, in his par
per, the Washtenaw Post, are alleged
seditious statements which might war-
rant the paper being barred from the
United States mails. Mr. Helber claims
that the "war had gotten on his
nerves," and that he wanted to do
what was right. He ended by saying,
"forgive me."
Gorman C. Parker, president of the
Parker Manufacturing company of De-
troit, has recently purchased the plant
of the Star Motor company on East
Summit street in this city. All the
machinery from the Detroit plant has
been moved to Ann Arbor, and the
company is expected to resume opera-

}2

BEAUTY SHOP
Miss Mable Rowe, Shampoo, Man-
icure, Massage, and Chiropody. 326
N. Fifth Ave. 2402.-Adv.
Recreation makes for Efficiency.
"We try to treat you right." Huston
Bros.-Adv. tf.

Class dancing at the Packard Aca-
deimy Monday an Thursday eve-
nings, 7:"0 to9 . Private hecsons
by appointment,. od-Wed
Buy your alain clocks- at J. L.
Chapman's, Jeweler. 113 S. Main.
-A dv.

Established 1848

IN \
"j ,/ji: Sk
r~r '-n / U7'
the Pdic .pry,"-ra1

In all our years

of experience
found it well

we have
to cater

to a conservative trade.
This policy is particularly
evident in our Ready
Clothes department.

Hirsh-Wickwi re
Clothes for Young Men

are very tasty and very stylish,
but they are not extreme.
$25 and up

C

WAGNER & CO.
State Street at Liberty

R w r n n rrr ir w

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