100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Download this Issue

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

October 10, 1917 - Image 1

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1917-10-10

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

4hr
t an

:4Iait ti

ASSOCIATED
PRESS
DAY AND NIGHT WIRE
SERVICE

ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN, WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 10, 1917.

PRICE THREE CENTS

U.S ILIKE SASON
SAYS RE OGA
America Boastfully Gave Its War
Secrets to Europe and Now
Must Suffer Results
PEOPLE MUST BUY BONDS NOW
OR WEAR 'EM IN A FEW YEARS
Loaning of Money in 1917 Will Assure
American Nation's Liberty
in 1920
Hzralding the launching of the sec-
ond Liberty Loan campaign, Reverend
Lloyd C. Douglas of the First Congre-
gational church delivered a patriotic
sermon Sunday morning entitled "The
Gates of Gaza."
Samson, the strong man of the old
Hebrews, wishing to prove his prodig-
ous strength unto all people, once
wrested away the heavy iron gates of
Gaza constructed by the Phillistines
at the entrance to their city for the
purpose of shutting the giant off from
access. These gates he gleefully bore
home on his shoulders to exhibit to
the wondering people. Later the
boastful hero was captured, his eyes
were bored from his head, and his
strength rendered powerless.
America is the Samson of modern
times and has conducted herself just
as the old Samson here portrayed. We
discovered our great strength, we ex-
perimented with it on our enemies,
and found that it would serve us just
as we wished. Soon, however, we
grew vain and boastful, and acted
foolishly. We discovered the subma-
rine, a wonderful plaything, and gagve
it to others to amuse themselves with
it. We planned the aeroplane and
taught others how to wind it up and
enjoy themselves. In this way we
wasted our useful possessions.
Then the war came. At first we
thought it would not affect us, we did
not like war aid we thought we would
not have it.
Everything is changed now. Today
the war faces us as grimly as though
we alone were fighting Germany.
"Every day there are fewer men in
that thin human wall between Ger-
many and New York," declared Rev-
erend Douglas. The task before us
now is to maintain an army in the
field the size of a city like Chicago.
To do this we need money for -guns,
food, clothing and numerous other
things.
We are fighting a people who are
willing to endure torture, undergo
misery, give up everything provided
only they can conquer. Today the ap-
peal is being made to the public to
buy bonds. "You may buy bonds or
you may wear bonds," said Rev. Mr.
Douglas, "Choose which ever you pre-
fer. You may lend your money to
the government of the United States
at four per cent in 1917, or you can
give it outright to Germany in 1920,-
plus your liberty."
Gardens Should Be Reported Upon
Whether or not the war garden cam-
paign begun in Ann Arbor last spring
was a success or not is being deter-
mined by the Civic association in a
compiling of gardeners' reports.
All persons who secured gardens
through the association have been
asked to write the secretary, stating
the amount of the various crops taken
from the land. The replies will de-
cide whether the campaign will be re-
peated in 1918. Anyone who has not
already sent in a report should do so

immediately.
LIBERTY BOND SALES FALL
BELOW NECESSARY AVERAGE
Washington, Oct. 9.-Liberty bond
sales in the chief financial sections of
the country have fallen below the
necessary average to reach the three
billion dollars which is the minimum
set by Secretary McAdoo.

TRAINING
TO BE

CLASS
DISMISSED

* * * * * * * * * * * * *

Members of Corps Must Attend Special
Lectures to Be Ex-
cused
Lieut. G. C. Mullen's military train-
nig classes will be excused from drill
this afterngon to attend the Michigan-
Kalamazoo Normal school game on
condition that they attend the address-
es to be given by Major Victor C.
Vaughan, and Major E. Rist, of the
French army medical service at 6:30
o'clock tonight in Hill auditorium.
There will be no additional drill
periods with the exception of Thurs-
day afternoon, until Monday after-
noon, on account of the Galli-Curci
concert at 8 o'clock tomorrow night in
Hill auditorium, and convocation for
all University students on Friday aft-
ernoon.
Major Victor C. Vaughan, dean of
the medical school, will speak on the
effect of the war in the medical pro-
fession. Major E. Rist will deliver
and address on the "Health Conditions
of the rench Army." Immediately
after his talk in the auditorium, Major
Rist will speak before the members of
the Research club on "Anti-Typhoid
Vaccintions in the French Army."
Col. Dercie to Deliver Address
Col. C. U. Dercle of the French
mnedical service, is expected to lecture
on the "Sanitary Service of the French
Front," Friday night. The time and
place will be announced later.
No word has yet been received as to
when Col. Thomas H. Goodwin and
Captain Gilmore of the British army
medical service, will speak to the
cadets, the students and general pub-
lic.
Plan New Courses of Initruction
New courses of instruction are be-
ing arranged for those who desire to
take special advance work in mili-
tary training. Lieutenant Mullen has
received between 150 to 200 applica-
tions for entrance to the new courses.
The additional classes will be held at
1:30 o'clock and 7 o'clock every day,
with the exception of Saturday, in the
basement of Waterman gymnasium.
Members of the faculty, who enroll-
ed in the military courses, met last
night in Waterman gymnasium. Com-
mencing Monday evening the faculty
class will drill in the gymnasium at
7 o'clock, five nights a week.
Non-Commissioned Officers Start Soon
Classes for non-commissioned of-
ficers will not start until next Mon-
day night. The students enrolled in
this course will meet in the gymnas-
ium at a time to be announced later.
No appointments for captains and
lieutenants of the different companies
have as yet been made by Lieutenant
Mullen. There will be no promotions
until the men are qualified to hold
the positions. The students at the pre-
sent time are divided into squads of
eight with a temporary corporal over
each.
PROF, SHEPARD APPOINTED
TO TWO NATIONAL COMMITTEES
Prof. J. F. Shepard of the depart-
ment of psychology has been called to
Washington where he has received an
appointment to the staff of Adjutant-
General Gorgias as a member of the
committee on personnel.
In addition to this honor Professor
Shepard has been given a position on
the sub-committee on aviation which
will influence largely the final plans
made by the government to prepare
for the air campaign against the cen-
tral powers. The work of the latter
committee is to devise tests for the
future birdmen and personally see
them enacted.
The committee on personnel, of

which Professor Shepard is a member,
is perhaps one of the most important
committees which works in conjunc-
tion with the new national army. The
duty of the committee is to examine
the men to discover their aptitude for
any particular branch of the service.

THE LIBERTY LOAN-
Consists of a $3,000,000,000 bond
issue.
Will pay four per cent interest.
Bears interest from Nov. 15,
1917.
Bonds are duedNov. 15, 1942.
Bonds. are redeemable at the
option of the United States at par,
and the accrued interest on and
after Nov. 15, 1927.
Is as safe as the nation. Is
within everyone's reach.

*
*
*
*
*
*
9,
*
*
*
*
*
*

* * * * * * * .* * * * * * *
WILL CANVASS STUDENTS,
AND FACUILTY FOR BONDS
TO HOLD MASS MEETING AND
"HARD TIMES"
PARADE
Twenty-five University faculty mem-
bers attended the opening session of
the $200,000 second Liberty loan drive
among the students at a luncheon yes-
terday noon in the Union building. All
departments of the different schools
and colleges of the University were
represented..
Personal canvasses for bond sub-
scriptions from each professor and in-
structor are expected to be made by 4
o'clock this afternoon.
Believing that the bonds are within
the reach of every student, who, with
a little self-denial, could easily make
the deposit of $5.00 and the payment
of a dollar a week for 45 weeks, the
loan committee of Ann Arbor set the
University's quota at $200,000. This
means the purchase of a bond by prac-
tically every student enrolled this se-
mester.
Appoint Members of Commttees\
Several committees were appointed
at the meeting to undertake the task
of disposing of the required number
of bonds. The members of the cam-
paign committee are Prof. John C.
Parker and Prof. Leo Sharfman.
Stephen Attwood, '18E; George Har-
ley, president of the Michigan Union;
Dr. Arthur Hall, Wilfred Shaw, Dean
Myra B. Jordan, Mildred Mighell, '18,
women's editor of The Daily, and Anna
Lloyd, '18, were appointed members
of the executive committee.
The publicity committee is com-
posed of Mr. John A. Mosenfeldter,
'17; Mildred Mighell, '18; Mrs. Kram-
er; Robert McDonald, '18, and H. G.
Wilson, '18. There will be a monster
mass meeting in combinatibn with the
M. A. C. mass meeting and a "Hard
Times" parade for the purpose of
arousing enthusiasm. C. Phillip Em-
ery, '18; Mr. P. G. Bartelme, athletic
director, and George Harley were ap-
pointed on the mass meeting and pa-
rade committee.
More than 75 speakers were also
chosen to assist in bringing the prop-
osition before the students in the dif-
ferent churches and theaters of the
ett .
Late last night the county commit-
tee reported that they could not esti-
mate the exact amount of bonds that
have been sold. They have, however.
prepared for a shortage in Liberty
buttons which are given to the sub-
scribers and wired to the Chicago
headquarters for another 4juantity of
them.
* * * * * * * * * * * * * *

NEWPEACE MOVE
BY GERMANYAN
AGREE UPON NO TERRITORIAL
AGGRANDIZEMENT SAYS
ZEITUNG
PROPOSE SURRENDER
OF FRANCE AND BELGIUM
Terms Include Payment for Aquired
Land and No Indemuity
on Either Side
Amsterdam, Oct. 9.-Another peace
offer to the allies, having as its basis
no territorial aggrandizement, has
been agreed upon by Germany and
Austria, the Deutsche Hages Zeitung,
of Berlin, says it learns by good au-
thority.
The offer includes the surrender of
Belgium and French territory, the re-
nunciation of positive territorial ac-
quisitions for payments in money, and
no indemnity on either side.
Speculation here ,was that Chancel-
lor Michaelis might make some sort
of a peace announcement today in his
speech, advertised as likely to outline
Germany's war aims.
No details were given on how the
rumored peace offer would be ad-
vanced.
According to Berlin reports a sen-
sational session of the reichstag is ex-
pected. One dispatch said that Chan-
cellor Michaelis was absent from Ber-
lin while another reported him ready
to speak.
The resignation of Vice-Chancellor
Helfferich as a result of the crisis ~
which Michaelis now faces in the Ger-
man parliament is freely predicted by
the German press. The radicals and
many of the conservatives in the
reichstag are opposed to him because
of his failure to announce a decisive
governmental policy at Saturday's ses-
sion.
Berlin advices indicated that to-
day's debate will toter around
pending motion advanced by the in-
dependent socialists to censure SHelf-
ferich for his failure to respond in-
terpellations Saturday.
GERMAN STRENGTH
SHOWS DECREASE
Huns Draining from 1918-20 Reserves,
Says French Staff
Review
Washington, Oct. 9. - Germany's
military strength now shows a clear
decrease for the first time since the
war began, according to the reviw
based upon data of the French gen-
eral staff made public here tonight by
the French high commission.
Wearing down and driving back by
the never ending pounding of the al-
lies on the western front, the state-
ment says, that the Germans have
made their supreme military effort
after drawing heavily upon their in-
active armies and calling out their
1918 and part of their 1919 reserves.
Thus while the allies have reached
and are prepared to maintain their
full strength while waiting the com-
ing of America's great army the
enemy's resources are diminishing at
the very moment when the military
situation demands that they increase.

*
*
*
*
*
*
*
*
*
*

NOTICE I

0

The Daily is to run a list of'
names tomorrow of all Michigan'
men (including alumni) now in'
military service. Anyone know-'
ing a Michigan man in the serv-
ice will confer a favor by bring-
ing in the name with the class'
and branch of service to The'
Daily office before 12 o'clock to-

* Hygiene Lecture to Be Given Soon
* Dr. A. S. Warthin's lecture on Sex
* and Personal Hygiene which is given
* every year to freshmen, will be given
* aboutthe third week in October.
* All freshmen are urged to attend
* the lecture which is given three times
* so as to accommodate every man. Ad-
* mission will be by tickets, these be-
* ing distributed sometime soon to all
* members of the class of 1921.

* day.

i

Annum Y.W.C.A. Banquet
Barbour Gymnasium-
Saturday, Oct. 13, 6 O'Clock

Upper
Class men
Get your tickets at
the table in the
Library before 5
o'clock Thursday.

Back to Top

© 2020 Regents of the University of Michigan