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January 23, 1918 - Image 1

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1918-01-23

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WEATHER
SHIAT COLDER
TODAY

I

ret

i1Iaitj

ASSOCIATED
PRESS
DAY AND NIGHT WE
SERVICE

XXVIII. No. 86.

ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN, WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 23, 1918.

PRICE THREE C

lCgTE ROADS
ICOAL CARS
lIGHT, OF WAY

PROBLEM OF TRANSPORTATION
IS BECOMING WORSE
DAILY
MICHIGAN DEALERS
CALL ORDER FIZZLE
Stopping of Factories Fails to Build
Up Fuel Reserve in
Detroit
Washington, Jan. 22.- An urgent
recommendation that an embargo be
declared for a few days on the ac-
ceptance by the railroad that any
freight except coal or fuel, was sub-
mitted to Director General McAdoo
by the fuel administration.
This action is imperative, Adminis-
trator Garfield said, to a good move-
ment of fuel during the remainder of
the week, when the general transport-
ation east of the Mississippi threatens
to become worse daily because of the
prolonged delay to the railroads due
to snows and intensely cold weather.
Tonight the five day period of in-
dustrial suspension ended and with the
resumption of manufacturing tomor-
'row railroad officials look for a new
flood of traffic which the railroads
cannot handle until normal weather
is restored.- '
McAdoo Does Not Favor
Director General McAdoo tonight
was not inclined to look with favor
on the embargo proposal but promised
to give it careful consideration.
The necessity for some new method
of dealing with the coal transportation
problem was emphasized today by
scores of reports that, weather condi-
tions were as bad or worse than at
any time since the unprecedented per-
iod of cold and stormy weather start-
ed nearly two weeks ago.
Ships Being Bunkered
The bright phase of the situation
was a report of Fuel Administrator
Garfield that ships were being bunker-
ed more rapidly than last week and
that coal was going in sufficient quant-
ities to domestic, consumers.
It was evident the fuel administra-
tion was disappointed in that the or-
der could not help railroad congestion
as much as was hoped for. Weather
conditions were blamed for this but;
it was clear also that fuel administra-
tion officials felt that a general em-
bargo against the freight during the
five day closing period would have
helped materially,

"SMILEAGE" BOOKS
CAMPAIGN TO START
Local Committees To Arrange Details
At Meeting Held
Today
In order to perfect details for the
"Smileage book" c.ampaign, Prof. E.
1=. Kraus has called for a meeting of
the local committees, to be held at
5 o'clock this afternon in the board
of education room in the Ann Arbor
high chool building. The committee
consists of 15 members, five of whom
represent the University.
The campaign which begins next
Monday morning, is for the purpose
of promoting the sale of "Smileage
books" which the committee on train-
ing camp activities are having printed.
These books contain 20 coupons, each
of which is a guarantee for a smile,
as an admittance check to one of the
entertainments of the Liberty thea-
ters, which the government has placed
in all training camps. Much of the
best talent in the country has been
secured for the lectures and entertain-
ments.J
The purchasers of these books are
supposed to forward it to some soldier
in camp who will be able to enjoy sev-
eral hours of recreation. The books
will sell for a dollar each.

Roosevelt Ignores Stone 's Assault
Washington, Jan. 22.-Col. Theodore Roosevelt, who arrived here
today from Oyster Bay, said that he was here to peacefully urge the
passage of a universal military service law. Before he leaves town,
later in the week, he will makea statement on the conduct of the war.
He had a conference tonight with Republican congressional leaders.
Colonel Roosevelt disclaimed any purpose of replying to Senator
Stone's speech in the senate yesterday. "I am infinitely less inter-
ested in what Senator Stone says about me than in what the President
says about Senator Chamberlain," said Colonel Roosevelt. "I wish to
aid Senator Chamberlain and Representatives Madden and Kahn in
their fight fir universal military training."
LAW STUDENTS ADVISED WAR COUNCIL ADOCATE
TO REMAIN, IN SCKOOL TO CONTINUE CONTEST
ACTING I)EAN E. C. GODDARD CHAMBERLAIN TO REFER BILL TO
TELLS MEN IMMEDIATE EN- COMMITTEE IN SPITE OF
LISTMENT NOT URGED WILSON
That law students should not only Washington, Jan. 22.-- Neither the
continue with their work for the com- aggressive opposition of President
ing semester, but that they should also Wilson nor the apparent certainty that
enroll for the summer session, was the their measures would have no chance
statement made by Prof. E. C. Goddard,! in the house even if passed by the

RALLY PLANNED TO
HELP PARIS UNION
Thirty Colleges and Universities Give
Support to Movement for
Gathering in Boston
Boston, Jan. 22.- Plans are being
made for an All-college rally to take
place here on the tentative date, Feb.
12, the entire proceeds going to the
American University Union in Paris.
Thirty. colleges and universities
have already given their support to
the movement. Alumni associations
of New England have been quick to
endorse the plan as a patriotic sub-
stitute for the usual mid-winter ban-
quet.
The fund raised at the Boston rally.
will be used by the University Union
to help maintain its Paris headquarters
for the use of college men in military
service of the United States when on
leave of absence.
Options have been secured on the
Boston opera house and other large
halls to insure adequate accomoda-
tions. Arrangements are on foot to
obtain several prominent speakers for
the occasion.
No word has been received here of
the plans of the Boston rally, though
President Harry B. Hutchins is one
of the trustees and former Prof.
Chalres B. Vibbert is on the execu-
tive committee.
Women Rally to
Opera Try-Outs4

Tl BY POLITICIAh
FER NEW HRI

FOOD

AND POLITICS
DISCONTENT AMO
PEOPLE

GENERAL STRIKE IS
VIRTUALLY EN
Trotzky Said To Be Preparing A
Note To Entente on
Peace

Jan.
ternal

(By Associated Press)
22.--4While the political
situation in Austria-Hun

Amateurs' Page
Features Gargoyle

The Gargoyle, resplendent with
drawings, brimming over with scinti-
lating bits of wit and humor, and
boasting the first "Amateurs' Page"
since its inception, makes its ap-
pearance this noon.
From the thousands of contributed
poems and manuscripts the Gargoyle
editors have chosen what is deemed
the best material that ever graced the
columns of the monthly magazine.
The cover portrays a winter scene, the
inside matter possesses "roasts" that
make a happy balance.
Among other things of interest is
the reproduction of a meeting of Ann
Arbor's landladies, which will doubt-
less bring blushes to the cheeks of
those individuals. The resolutions
that come with the New Year are giv-
en great consideration and their empt-
iness. disclosed.
Those who have viewed the proofs
of the January Gargoyle are sponsors
for the statement that former numbers
must take a back seat *to this issue,
which is classed as the "biggest and
best ever." The Gargoyle appears on
sale this noon.
FRENCH PLAY READY TO
BE STAGED ON SATURDAY
Cast of Faculty Members To Present
"L' Amour Medecin" at Soiree
of Cerele Vrancals

acting dean of the Law school, at an
assembly of all law students yester-
day morning. The meeting was held
for the purpose of discussing the fut-
ure of the Law school, and the ques-
tion of law students enlisting for gov-
ernment service.
Professor Goddard stated that there
was no urgent need for immediate en-
listment in the government service,
since the government already had
more men on hand that it was able
to provide for, under present condi-
tions. He explained that men now
sworn into the service, who were to
have been called on January 25, will
not be called until April and possibly
not until the end of the school year.
Rumors that the Law school was
planning to close or cease giving part
of their scheduled courses, were em-
phatically denied by the speaker. The
1918 summer session will be held as
well as the regular 1918-19 term.
LIE UT. J. H. CLARK HER), TO
COMPLETE ENROLLMENTS

Detroit, Jan. 22, - Although State
Iuel Administrator Prudden in a
statement today expressed an opinion
that the five day suspension of indus-
try and his own restrictions had saved
to Michigan approximately 150,000 cars
of fuel, local dealers were not so
optimistic. They declared that the
suspension had not built up a coal
reserve here for domestic consump-
ion. The fuel shortage was still felt
n several Michigan towns although
no suffering was reported.
Detroit, Jan. 22.-After urgent rep-
resentations by Police Commissioner
Couzens, State Fuel Administrator
Prudden tonight amended his fuel con-
ervation order to permit the Detroit
estaurants and those in cities of 100,-
00 population or more to operate 24
hours a day instead of nine as stip-
lated in the original order.
The police commissioner told the
tate fuel director that his department
3Lready had to deal with three small
rots growing out pf the drastic re-
trictions on eating houses and that he
eared further trouble if the restau-
ants were compelled to remain clos-
d at night.
OVERNMENT'S PLANS FOR
DEMOBILZAT1O COMPLETE
London, Jan. 22.-The government's
,ians for the eventual demobilization
re. stated to be practically complete.
Assistanceofytrade unions will be
ought in 'carrying them out.
The question of demobilization of
Xomen is now being dealt with and
,h i'nvernment hopes soon to have a

Music and ballets will be featured
in the production cf Moliere's play,
"L'Amour Medecin," which le to be
acted by a cast of faculty members
at the soiree of the Cercle Francais
at 8 o'clock Saturday night in Sarah
Caswell Angell hall.
The music is being provided by Prof.
Albert A. Stanley. It will consist most-
ly of selections from the work of
Lulli and Purcell, but there will be
one piece composed especially for this
production.
Prof. E. L. Adams, director of the
Cercle Francais, has general charge
of the play. Dancing will be directed
by Prof. Herbert Kenyon, and singing
by Mr. Albert Hurlburt. Members of
the University orchestra will play un-
der the leadership of Prof. Earl V.
Moore.
The play will be followed by a dance.
Jnion Dance To Be Held on Friday
The Union will give a dance on
Friday night, from 9 to 1 oclock.
Tickets will go on sale at 5 o'clock
today.

Lieut. J. H. Clark is in Ann Arbor
at the present time for the purpose
of completing the enrolhnent of the
Naval Auxiliary Reserve Unit which
is being organized on the campus.
The men forming this unit will be-
gin a training course as soon as called
into active service, whereby they may
fit themselves to qualify as officers,
up to the grade of Ensigns on trans-
ports and munition ships, serving
either the army or the navy in foreign
waters. Men who qualify as Ensigns
will rank with the first and second
Lieutenants in the army.
Because of the needs of the service,
men filling certain educational re-
quirements are being selected. When
called, such men will be given a short
intensive course which has been plan-
ned to train the candidates as rapidly
as possible, and to prepare them in
six months-for active service as of-
ficers on vessels of the navy.
The new course in Navigation to be
given by Prof. R. H. Curtiss will be ar-
ranged in every possible way to meet
the needs of men in the Michigan unit
who will remain in college for part,
ci all, of the new semester. Those who
complete the course in Navigation will
rave preparation for the .Ensigni ex-
aminations which must be taken soon-
er or later by all who rise in the
deck division. Those who remain for
a part of the semester only will be
given special attention in order that
they may make as much progress as
possible before being called into ser-
vice.

senate, is halting the campaign of
advocates in congress who have fail-
ed to establish a war cabinet and a
director of munitions.
When the senate reconvenes Thurs-
day, according to plans made today by
Chairman Chamberlain and his asso-
ciates on the military committee, the
contest will be opened.
They proposed a motion to refer the
war cabinet bill to the military com-
mittee as the vehicle of debate, to
open discussion of the merits of their
war machinery re-organization pro-
gram. Senator Chamberlain expects
to reply to the statement issued by
President Wilson last night criticizing
him for his New York speech in which'
the Oregon senator sad the military es-
tablishment has "broken down."'
BANQUET OF ARMY STORES- MEN
PROVES TO BE GREAT SUCCESS
Plenty of pep and a large turnout
contributed to the decided success of
the banquet and entertainment, given
at the Union last night by the army
stores men. After the banquet, which
was served at 6 o'clock, stunts and
other forms of entertainment were
presented. Irwin T. Sanborn, '20, won
favor with his "Fatima" vaudeville
act, as did Mr. Arthur Bachrach, in-
structor in ordnance department, with
his clever monologue, "Hot Stuff."
Several good song numbers were pre-
sented by army stores men, R. M. Par-
sons, H. E. Sepull, C. E. Sharpe, G. F.
Golliver, S. J. Hiett, and P. E. Lypn.
Special music was furnished by a
"Jazz" band composed of H. R. Cos-
sitt, '19, Harry Sunloy, '20, G. B. Riker,
'20D, J. R. Gardner, '20, G. S. Heath,
'18E, U. Carpenter, '20, and P. E. Ly-
ons.
PAYROLL OF ROADS INCREASED
BY 117,500 POUNDS A WEEK
London, Jan. 22.-The latest advance
it. wages of railway employees in this
country, consisting of six shillings a
week to men and three shillings to
women and youths under 18, repre-
sents a total addition to the payroll
of the railroads of 9,230,000 pounds a
year, or 177,500 pounds a week.
W. R. Carl, '21, Passes Aviation Exam
Walter R. Carl, '21, has successfully
passed the required examinations for
entrance to the aviation service, and
is awaiting orders, which will proba-
liy not arrive for several weeks. Carl
took the examination in Detroit.

Michigan girls want to act in the
annual Michigan Union opera.
That was demonstrated yesterday
afternoon at a try-out for places in the
cast held in the School of Music, when
more than 60 girls enrolled as pros-
pective chorus girls and principals in
"Let's Go," the first opera at Michi-
:an, and probably at any American
university, in which both men and
women will appear. .
Since the announcement was made
in Sunday's Daily that Michigan girls
were to be asked to participate in the
opera, the innovation has been hotly
discussed on the campus. The men
were pretty generally of one mind
that not only would it be an unfortu-
nate move on the part of the Union of-,
ficials to include girls in the cast, but
also that the girls would not wish to
appear in the opera. From the large
i umber oftgirls who turned out and
from the exceptional talent they show-
ed at the preliminary try-out, the au-
thors are satisfied that the objections
of the male students have been com-
pletely overcome.
Every class was represented among
the applicants, even although_ it had
been announced thatafreshman girls
would be barred; and practically ev-
ery sorority was represented by at
least one member.
"I am extremely well pleased with
the talent presented this afternon,"
stated A. L. Weeks,'10, yesterday.
"In fact, the women appeared to such
advantage that I am now contemplat-
ing a revision of the book, in order.
to create more female parts in the
cast."
There will be another try-out for
women held in the near future, at
which time those who were not pres-
ent yesterday will have the oppor-
tunity of competing for places in the
opera.
TWO LIEUTENANTS AND PRIVATE
KILLED WHEN PLANES COLLIDE
Washington, Jan. 22.-First lieuten-
ants William H. Chenzy and, Oliver
Sherwood and Private George Beach
were killed Sunday in a collision of
airplanes over an American aviation
school in France, the war department
was advised tonight by General Persh-
ing. None of the three were Michigan
men.

has quieted, the fire of disconten
merely smouldering and at no dis
date it may again break out into a
conflagration.
The politicians, apparently with
timistic utterances, have silenced
situation but admitted that i
fraught with grave possibilities
far as the dual monarchy is concer
The known war weariness of the -
ple and the food shortage are likel
again bring forth complications.
Strike Settled
The general strike, which it is
serted, took more than 1,000,000 n
and women from their work, a h
proportion of them engaged in R
virtually ended Monday morning,
at last accounts the people were
clamoring for food and for a ce
tion of hostilities.
In Germany the censorship se
ingly is holding the newspapers
check as regards the discussion of
ternal affairs in that country.
Trotzky Prepares Note
The status of the situation as
gards Russia and the peace con
ence remains unchanged. ieon Tr
ky, the Bolsheviki foreign minis
who is now in Petrograd, is said to
preparing another note to the ent.
powers on the subject of peace.
On the fighting front compara
calm prevails except for artillery d
and small patrol engagements.
NO TRACE FOUND O
DETROIT ROBBE
Detroit, Jan. 22.---Although ne
a score of persons had been taken
police headquarters and questic
during the day, no trace has b
found tonight of the $65,000 in jev
and cash taken by three men, who
forenoon held up the downtown jem
ry store of Ralph Dewer. A hur
estimate of the amount of jewelry
cash taken was at first placed at I
000, but careful check later sho
a total of $65,000.
According to the police the robi
was one of the biggest in the ci
history.

Plan To Recover Fortunes After
London, Jan. 22.--Salvage comb
les here already are working
schemes to recover the fortunes ;
the war, lying in torpedoed ship
the bottom of the sea, Apart fron
,bullion and silver in sunken s
there is a large quantity of other v
able metals worth diving for. M
of the spots have been marked
enterprising salvage men with an
to the future.
Last 'on of Coal Sold Testerd
With people still clamoring for
at police headquarters, the last
of coal was sold yesterday. Co
Fuel Administrator Junius E.I
received word that the governrr
has started a big shipment' of coa
ward Michigan from the coal field
West Virginia. Administrator Bea
lieved a number of stores and frat
ity houses yesterday with coal
pecially consigned to him.

' 1

TICKETS
POPULAR
PRICES
25c and 35c
At Waters

ORATORICAL ASSOCIATION PLAY

Sarah

'"The Tragedy ot9Nan"
By John Masetield.

Caswell
Angell
Hall

French Charter Thirty
Washington, Jan. 22.-
man ships seized by Bra
tered the war, are being
tLe French government
poses. This announef
state department gave fu
of the inter-allied agre
provisioning of France

FRIDAY JAN. 25

8 o'clockl

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