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This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

January 17, 1918 - Image 6

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1918-01-17

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

}HOE

N LAST

Large Shipment Just
Arrived
All sizes and widths
Regulation or Oil Tanage
Price $7.00

u<

k-Over
)T SHOP
S. MAIN ST.

complete line

UNIVERSA CONSORS ION
A OCATED__BY FOSTER
(Continued from Page One)
gical dressings and with inadequate
operating materials.
Reports Circulated by Enemies
"It appears to me," the speaker con-
tinued; "that these reports are circu-
lated by paid German agents and they
gain momentum by the people in this
country who appear to love gossiping
more than their country. This does
more harm than bullets.
"In my visits through France I found
that the ideals of all the Allies are the
same. Everyone knows what democ-
racy is, and they hate the idea that has
been drilled into the head of Germans
-the idea that that nation is chosen
by God to dominate the world."
French Line Endangered
"At the present time the thin line
that extends from Perronne to Switz-
erland is in danger by the vast horde
of Germans that may be released from
the Russian frontier. If the line cracks
it means that the men from this Uni-
versity and all over the country must
be sent in unprepared to fill the
breech."
"France's spirit, after three years of
intense suffering, is wonderful and un-
daunted," President Foster stated.
"The women are working in the fields,
within range of the big guns, helping
to raise food for the soldiers in the
trenches, and are employed in muni-
tion factories, turning out millions of
bullets every d.ay. This war is a war
against women and children. Thous-
ands of women have been made home-
less by the thoroughness of the Ger-
mans in blowing up the houses. The
Red Cross has been having a hard time
in getting these people to leave their
homes after they have been destroyed,
and in many cases succeeded in only
getting the children to come to the
rear where they are cared for by
medical attendants."
France- Welcomes Sammles
Scenes of France's welcome to the
Sammies when they arrived, the im-
mense problem of drilling 40,000 men
on the same battle field that Napoleon
drilled his troops, the excellent service
of the hospitals in France, and the co-
operation of both men and women in.
helping to win the war, were depicted
by President Foster."
GARFIELD ORDERS NON-FOOD'
PLANTS IN 28 STATES CLOSED

Courses in telegraphy
have been voted into the
of Nebraska university.

Talked About In
World of Colleges

I

id Overcoats
lever Models
nd full belted, in handsome
single and double-breasted.

for women
curriculum

$19.50 to $40

PLE PREFER
orS

Pure Pasteurized Cream
Ideal Place to Eats
Cafeteria Service.
Home Cooked Food:
Popular Prices.
Daylight Surroundings.
cade Cafeteria
In the Nickels Arcade
just. Recieved
w to be a Soldier"
By Brainless Bates
25c per copy
han Co.
Detroit

A new residence building with a ca-
pacity sufficient to accommodate 108
students will be ready in February
for the women of the University of
Oregon:
There are approximately 1,200 Pur-
due me in military service at pres-
ent.
Students at Cornell who bolt classes
two days before or two days after re-
cess will be required to pay a fine of
$2 for every day on which an absence
occurs.
One-half of the seniors of the Shef-
field Scientific school are now in mili-
tary service and one-third of these are
commissioned officers.
Ohio State university has published
a pamphlet in an effort to eliminate
"cribbing" which deals with the honor
system and several measures which
may be used in wiping out the evil.
Drafted Purdue men will be sent
knitted articles by the university. En-
gineering students are to contribute
the money to purchase the wool, and
wives of faculty members have volun-
teered to do the knitting.
A form of scrap inaugurated by the
Pennsylvania State university Is for
the opposing sides to tie up as many
of their opponents as possible in a
given time. Fifty men from each class
will participate.
At a recent meeting of the president
ond fellows of Harvard college, it was
voted not to charge a graduation fee
of $20 to men who graduate in 1918,
and go into active service prior to
commencement,
The annual Amherst senior cup has
been abandoned this year by a unani-
mous vote of the class, as an unneces-
sary social activity during war times.
WHAT'S GOING ON
TODAY
12:15 o'clock-Dental faculty lunch-
eon at the Michigan Union.
7 o'clock-Comedy club meets ihn
Cercle Francais rooms, University
hall.
8 o'clock-Dante club meets in room
103, University hall.
TOMORROW
7 o'clock-Social at the Baptist
church for Baptist and Disciple stu-
dents and friends.
7:30 o'clock-Alpha Nu literary so-
ciety meets in Alpha Nu rooms, Uni-
versity hall.
8 o'clock-Mchigan-Northwestern
debate in Hill auditorium.
8 d'clock-Michigan-Indiana basket-
ball game in Waterman gymnasium:
8:30 o'clock-Freshman engineer
dance at the Michigan Union.
8:30 o'clock-Catholic student dance
in Packard academy.
U-NOTICES
Try-outs for the Mid-West debating
squads will be held on Tuesday, Jan.
22, at 7 o'clock, in room 302 Mason
hall.
Saturday will be the last day for
Michiganensian sittings.
There will be no Glee club rehear-
sals tonight or Monday - night. Re-
hearsals will be resumed next Wed-
nesday.
All Armory dances scheduled for
this week have been cancelled by the

lmanagement to save fuel.
Act 1 of "The Tradegy of Man" will
rehearse at 7 o'clock tonight in Uni-
versity hall, and will be followed by
act 2 at 7:45 o'clock, and act 3 at 8:30
o'clock.
All members of the Varsity band
must be measured for headquarters
brigade uniforms at Henry and Co.
today.

.--
H A RWOOD
3 SYLE
POSC ESING TH E QULITY
FOUND IN ALL
2fBor $4D
EARL & WLSON ar
-Rnoy-S BEgS'T PRqODucT
S P ALDING
Equipment for Outdoor
Winter Sports
SKATES and SHOES
for all kinds of skating
HOCKEY SUPPLIES
SNOW SHOES
SKIS
SWEATERS
The Spalding line affords you the
widest range ofselection with a guar.
antee that every article will give Satis
faction and service.

NICKELS
ARCADE

could be defined as
"RubydFootwear."
The enduring qual-
ity of Ruby Shoes,
considered at their
price, will stand the
"acid test" for true
conservation and
economy in compari-
son with the rest of
the shoe world-and
win.

Catalogue on request.

I

A. G.SPALDING & BROS.
21r-219 South State St. aPALOIP-
' CHICAGO S 0~

IN DETROIT
101 Washington Blvd.

"INE HOUR CLOSING
AFFECTS MANY

RULING
BUSINESSES

(Continued from Page One)'
been received to date. President'
Harry B. Hutchins has received no
information regarding such a propos-
al for the University.
Lights Must Go Out
Lights must be turned out at closing
time at all stores with the exception
of those which are absolutely neces-
sary. Window and other display lights
must be extinguished. Street lights
will be cut down as much as possible.
Ann Arbor does. not require coal to
run its electric power station because
it is operated by hydraulic power, but'
the order governs this city as well as,
all others,
Mayor Issues Proclamation
Mayor Ernest M. Wurster issued a
proclamation yesterday asking that
all places of business observe the new'
order. The mayor has been empower-
ed to enforce the law. No definite or-
ders had been received yesterday re-,
garding enforcement, but they are ex-
pected to arrive today. Immediate
action will be taken by the police de-
partment in handling violators of the,
rule.

WASHINGTON UNIVERSITY
SCHOOL OF NURSING
Nursin, offers to women an o
tunity for patriotic service, a spli
preparation for life and a professi
broad social usefulness.
Washington University gives a
years' course in Nursing. Theor
instruction is given in the Unive
clinical instruction in the wards o
Barnes and St. Louis Children's
pitals, Washington University Di
sary and Social Service Departs
Six months' credit is offered to
cants having an A.B. or B.S. d
from this college.
Address inquiries to the Sup
Nurses, Barnes Hospital, boo
Kingshighway, St. Louis, Mo.

i
Conservation-

th

SHOES
for
MEN and
WOMEN
Alfred J. Ruby
1 INCORPORATED

Three more carloads of coal a
received yesterday by the local
administrator. One of these was
en to the police for distribution,
was sent to the county officials
the farms, and the third was give
the Hoover plant. The coal loa
by the University had been ent:
sold out last night and the new s
ment was much needed. It is pr
ble that the University will give
additional supply to the city, inasi
as conditions are growing worse.
police are again urging that every
economize on fuel because no e
relief is anticipated.
TYPEWRITERS FOR RENT -W
ward & Washington. 8-9 A. A.
Bank Bldg.. Phone 866.-Adv.

I

(Continued from Page One)
included in the order unless the gov-
ernors of the state specifically declare
that they shall be included.
State administrators will be permit-
ted to issue special permits for the
use of coal if it appears necessary to
meet a grave emergency. This, how-
ever, will be a blanket exception, and
will not be abused.
President Approves Plan
The plan received the approval to-
day of President Wilson after its need
was substantiated by Dr. Garfield and
Secretaries Baker and Daniels.
Warning is given that provisions of
the Lever food control bill under
which the order is issued, and which
carries a penalty of $5,000 for viola-
tion, will be vigorously' enforced. The
bill gives power to forbid the use of
delivery of coal.
Dr. Garfield expects to save 30,000,-
000 tons of coal during the 10 weeks.
COMMITTEE ON STUDENT
ACTIVITIES TO CONSIDER HOP
Among the questions which are ex-
pected to be brought before the com-
mittee on Student Non-athletic activi-
ties at their meeting this afternoon, is
the J-hop.
Through an inadvertancy, the Daily
of Jan. 15, stated that the Senate
council voted to abolish the hop. This
was not the case. The committee on
non-athletic activities was organized
for the purpose of passing upon such
student functions. The Senate council
did not take any action on this point
Monday, but the J-hop committee the
same afternoon voted themselves to
abolish it.

.1

Officer's Uniforms

Again we wish to place the fact before those
who will wear officer's uniforms, that we can
give you a better military appearance and bet-
ter work than 95% of those doing this kind of
work. And none can do better. We cut and
make all our work in our, shop here in Ann
Arbor. We have done a great amount, of this
work for our Detroit trade, hence our experi-
ence, combined with high class tailoring and
skill. We ask you to call.

iS TO PLUNGE
) SHEEP RAISING
16.-Sheep raising
scale is expected to
a from a proposition
e the National Wool
on which meets for
on at Salt Lake City,
k J. Hagenbarth, of
of Growers, after a
s section, pronounc-
dairy and livestock
ld, capable of caring
p and 1,000,000 cat-
landowners, telling
patriotic duty to of-

fer land at the best possible terms
to stimulate the livestock industry,
which showed a decline owing to lack
of food on western ranges.
The matter was taken up by the Up-
per Penninsula Development bureau
with the result that its president, Leo
C. Harmon, with four others, is now
at Salt Lake City prepared to offer
sheep raisers 250,000 acres of land
on what are considered attractive

I

I

Sam Burchfield & Co.

terms.

t.

106 E. Huron Street

Downtown

The terms are that the graze
have free use of the lands ft
years, pay the taxes during the
pay the taxes and rental based
per cent of the purchase pricet
the fourth and fifth years. Tra
2,000 to 15,000 acres will be offe

rs will
or two
third,
on six
during

.--

-- m

Photographer
University Ave.

acts of Prof. Immel Accompanjes Team
red. Prof. R. K. Immel accompanies the
team to Chicago.
The Northwestern negative which
is scheduled to arrive here this after-
noon, like Michigan's negative, has
only one man with previous varsity
experience. This man, Clifford North-
copp, represented Northwestern in a
debate with Iowa in 1916, and against
Chicago last year in the Central
League debate. Northcopp is a Jun-
ior. The other two men are James
Wiggens and A. B. Ritzholtz, both sen-
ior law students. Prof. J. L. Lardner
accompanies the team her~e.
Girls' storm hats- are selling' fast
....= at Wagner & Co. State St.-Adv.

Recreation makes
"We try to treat you
Bros.-Adv.

for Efficiency.
right." Huston
tu.

ENGINEERS
Let us supply you with your Tracing Cloth, Blue Print Paper, Detail
Paper, Drawing Paper, Etc. Con Proof Blue Books

Largest Dealer in,

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ermanent Customer

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