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January 16, 1918 - Image 2

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1918-01-16

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

year's tuition fre
won't leak, and
are you going

eading "Kai-
and we want
e, a fountain
more sleep;
to do about

CONFERENCE DECREES
GOOD SAMARITNISM,
STUDENT VOLUNTEERS ADVANCE
NEW IDEA OF CHRISTIAN -
WORK
Good Samaritanism and absence of
hatred were'the keynotes of the stu-1

I

Wlomen

Acting Dean Agnes E. Wells will be
at home to University women at 4
o'clock tomorrow afternoon at New-
berry residence.
Mr. N. C. Fetter, secretary of the
University Y. M. C. A., will speak on
"Tanks and Trenches" at 4:30 o'clock
this afternoon at Newberry hall.

i

leading philosopher says: "A
ears ago we wouldn't give a
it look for a pine stump-now
busted up they bring most any
>y the cord."
r reading an exchange that Wel-
college is going to run a farm
umumer, we have changed our
A farmer's life

who
the
t all
back

been called

discussing the weather these
nearly all people are omitting
dis."
.OS COMMITTEEEN

'w

VOLUNTEERS FOR
ED POSITIONS THIS

-I

Editor, The Michigan Daily:
The Michigan Union during the past
year, has met with the greatest diffi-
culty in filling its many committees.
MIost of the men who had, in previous
years, acquired experience in Union
work, and thereby made themselves
the logicall men to fill responsible pos-
tions, left school last spring to enter
their country's service. It was with
great difficulty that their places were
filled.
At Christmas time so many of the
men who have be'en active in the Un-
ion this year had left school for the
service of their country, that there is
today hardly a committee intact, and
in some cases committees are entirely
vacant. In addition, so many of the
men on our'reserve list are gone, that
we found it necessary to commence
anew our organization for the 'second
se ester. We, therefore, ask all Un-
on men who are in any way interest-
ed in the Union and the work it seeks
to do, to come to the building, Thurs-
day or Friday of this week, and sign
the "Application for Committeeship
List," at the cashier's desk.
The, president will be in his office
'rom 4 to 5:30 o'clock Thursday and
Friday to consult with. applicants
about the activities of the Union and
the ways in which they can help to
carry them out. From this list the
personnel of the committees will be
made up, and every signer will be
given consideration. Experience in
Union and campus work is not nec-
essary, but if the applicant has had
any, he should state it in the' applica-
tion.
This- is an opportunity for every Un-
itn, man to volunteer to do work for
a strong Michigan institution and a
chance to "do his bit" on the cam-
pus. We need him. .As a member of
the Union it is his duty to help carry
on its wide and important work.
University of Michigan Union,
GEORGE F. HURLEY,
President.
"AGONY" DECREE FORCES MEN
TO "DRESS AROUND THE NECK"
Camp Caster, Jan. 15.-Command-
ing-General Parker believes in a cer-
tain amount of "agony" in army dress
and he has decreed that hereafter
eryhCamp Custer private on leave
from camp or on "fatigue" shall wear
the' "rookie stock" which is a narrow
white collar, attached to the collar of
the soldier's blouse. Wearing it is
not optional and any man venturing
ferth without being "dressed up
aierund, the neck" will be subjected to
disciplinary measures.

dent volunteer conference at East ---
Northfield, Mass., which closed recent- The annual fancy dress party of the
ly. Instead of just converting the Wom'en's league will take place at 8
heathen to Christianity, the new mis- o'clock Saturday night. Admission can
sionaries will do civil welfare work. be paid at thei door although tickets
Thousands of people are needed to are on sale in most of the houses.
do work at home and a campaign was
begun to enlist the services of 20,000 y. W. C. A. cabinet meeting at 3:30
students of American universities. o'clock this afternoon at Newberry
That -democratization of our own hall
country as well as those of Europe
will be necessary after the war, isr All girls wishing to write lyrics or
thetbeliefosf the leaddeofthest-songs for the Junior Girls' play are
dents. This can be done only with asked to communicate with Emily
the hearty co-operation of all church- Powell, '19, Newberry residence, at
es and societies.on
Prominent Men Speaknc
Among the speakers at the confer-
ence was Dr. John R. Mott, a member Masques will hold a meeting Thurs-
of President Wilson's Russian com-t day at 7:30 o'clockat the Alpha Phi
mission. If his talk on "The World house. A short play will be presented.
Situation," Dr. Mott professed his ev-
erlasting faith in the Russian people Y90ERNMENT ASKS FULLEST
and their power to eventually become UTILIZATION OF POTA'O CROP
peacefully united.
Mr. Harry Ward of the Boston Theo- Potatoes may be cooked in 100
logical school spok' on "The Higher ways, declares the United States de-
Type of Socialism," setting forth the partment of agriculture in a statement
idea that this country must be Chris- urging a more extended use of the
tianized to prevent a great social up- tubers in order to utilize fully the
heaval now threatening it. The gov- large crop this year.
ernment control of industries was the A second reason for encouraging
foundation for his deductions. I the eating of more potatoes, is the
Mr. Robert E. Sp are and Bishops fact that consumption of grain will
MacDowell and McConnell of the be decreased. Potatoes are a good
Methodist church were also at the substitute for grain, and the common
conference. result of eating more of them is the
Michigan People Attend use of less wheat bread. This is very
Mr. Jose M. Hernandez, of the Span-: desirable.
ish department, Mr. N. C. Fetter, of It should be a simple matter, ac-
Lape hall, Esther L. Dorrance, '20, cording to specialists of the depart-
and Robert J. McCandliss, '18, were ment, to avoid .sameness of diet while
the Michigan representatives at the carrying out the suggestion of the
conference. government, since potatoes can be
Mr. Fetter, general secretary of the cooked in nu'mberless combination
University Y. M. C. A., said, "I was (dishes.
greatly impressed by the statesman- --
like manner in which all business HIGH 'CH '1 ? j t'fYSTRANDED
was handled. No sectarianism was FOR TWO DABS IN BLIZZARD
manifested. One of the most stressed
teachings was that the Christian or- The 20 high school students
ganization is the 6nly international who were snowbound at the Ward
power now in existence. All others farm, nine miles west of Ann Arbor,
have been overcome by the' war." arrived in town yesterday mornin
The conference was attended by on the first car which had come
650 delegates from all over the United through. since the blizzard began late
States,. as well as many foreign lands Fr iday night.
The students meet every four years. I ay .n ' .ndr h
~T klA1 .MLI i t ' LL nd fLt h L ,)Z

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MILITARY FRENCI
First Lessons in Spoken French for Men in Military Service....
Le Soldat A miericai en France .......................
The Soldier's English and French Conversation Book.......
International Conversation Book-French-English..........
Rapid-Fire English---French-German......................
Altemus' English-French Conversational Dictionary..........
Oxford English and French Conversation Book...............
Wilcox's War French ........................
Cortina-French and English Military Mtinual..............
French for Soldiers-by Whitten & Long.................
UNIVERSITY BOOKSTORES
We have a complete stock of
FLASHLIGHTS
and
Flashlight Batteries
Switzer's Hardware
310 STATE
1918

DESK CALEND
AT

Slaters Book Shop
Phone 430 336 S. State

Interesting Wis

I Gilberts and

The dreadnaught Texas established
the highest record for gunnery prac-
tice last year, and will receive the
Knox trophy, awarded annually to
battleships scoring the highest number
oe points.
An estimate based on surveys in 15
states shows approximately 1,266,061
women in the United States to be en-
gaged in essential war industrial
work.

Cranes
Choco

QUARRY DRUG 4
PRESCRIPTION ST4
Cor. State and N. Univ
Phone 308

Bronze statues in Belgian
ies have' been taken for war
by the Germans.

cemeter-
purposes*

IT
Ci

_ -j~~amng along a vicroa ant retresi-
~ clients, the party started out in a bob-
PA XIES DISCUSSED sled Friday evening expecting to reach
their destination in time to dance
ty Council Takes No Action At Moit- awhile and return that night. Progress
day Meeting Q proved so difficult that it was near
morning before they arrived.
The taxi question was discussed in

The foreign minister of Argentina "t'
has signed an agreement with the Detroit
in., 8:io
British and French ministers to sell °. M.
2,500,000 tons of wheat to the Entente eKylam
Allies. 8:48 p. m
Jackson
An. Arbo
Most of the money advanced by the t
Local C
United States to the nations in Europe a. m., 7:0
p. ism., 8:
engaged in war with Germany, is spent To Ypsil
in this country for the products of 2:05 '- m
our farms, mines, ald factories, change at
Local

be-

detail but no definite action was tak-
en at a meeting of the city council
held Monday night. A number of stu-
dents from the University attended
the meeting and in talking to Mr. W.
J. Mayer of the Ann Arbor Taxi com-
pany, insisted upon an answer as to
whether or not the company would
submit its books to a certified account-
ant to determine if it was necessary
for the company to ask an increase
in rates.
Citizens who were at the meeting
arose and stated instances of poor
treatment received.at the hands of the
taxicab companies, and City Attorney
Frank B. DeVine criticized the com-
panies for raising the taxi rates with-
out consulting the council. A city
ordinance will be drawn up soon which
will permanently settle the question.
Building Association Elects Officers
Directors of the Huron Valley Build-
ing and Savings association met last'
night to elect the officers for the com-
ing current year. They are: Presi-
dent, Robert Campbell; vice-president,
Charles L. Brooks; chairman of the
board of directors, Solomon F. Ginge-
rich; secretary and attorney, H. H.
Herbst; committee on securities,
George Spathelf, Horace Barnard andI
William Biggs; auditing committee,'
R. M..Wenley, Levi D. Wines, Ierman
G. Lindenschmitt.
The Ann Arbor Savings bank was
chosen as the depository of the asso-
ciation.

1 ACCINATION AND FUMIGATION
SERVED WITH YPSI BREAKFAST
Ypsilanti, Jan. 15.-Vaccination and
fumigation were served with patrons'
breakfast at the Kum Bak restaurant
in this city Monday morning when the
I police quarantined Roy Brooks, a
waiter, thought to be infected with
smallpox.
Several of the breakfasters in panic
tried to resist the attempts to make
them immune from disease. One man
swallowed a tablet of disinfectant he
had been told to put in bath water.
Prompt action with a stomach pump
saved him.
House of Representatives Elects
Despite a darkened campus and the
fact that there were no lights in their
society rooms in University hall, mem-
bers of the Adelphi House of Repre-
sentatives met last night in the Ann
Arbor Press building to elect officers
for the coming term.
The officers-elect are Wilfred Nevue,
'18, speaker, John Chase, '19, clerk,
Kelsey Guilfoil, '19, treasurer, and
Herbert Layle, '20, sergeant-at-arms.
Comedy. Club Postpones Meetinig
The meeting of the Comedy club
which was scheduled for last night in
the Cercle Francais rooms was post-
poned until 7 o'clock tomorrow night
in the same place owing to unheated
rooms. The results of the try-outs
for the comedy, "Miss Hobbs," which
the society is to present, will be an-
nounced Thursday or Friday.

Forty-one cargo vessels and tankers,
aggregating 327,152 tons dead weight,
which were requisitioned while under
construction by the United States ship-
ping board, will be completed and put
into service in January and February.
The American library association
war service has opened a dispatch of-
fice in Hoboken, N. J,, for the receipt
and sorting of books and presents for
the American soldiers and sailors in
France. ,
Greece expects to send fifteen divis-
ions to the allied forces next spring.
Many of these troops will be equipped
with Colt machine guns sent from
America.
The war relief, service of the D. A.
R. has subscribed $50,000 for the res-
toration of the French village Tilloloy
in Picardy.
The war department is considering
the advisability of selling equipment
to army officers at cost.
A government powder plant to cost
$60,000,000\ and to employ about 15,000
men is to be established by the war
department near Nashville, Tenn.
For the first time since the declar-
ation of war the navy is recruited to
its authorized strength, 162,476 men.
Always-Daily Service--Afways.

We have both the indwinotin
the equipment to furnish tb
best in banking service
The Ann Arbor Savings B,
XICORtPORATED 1 869
Capital and Surplus $ 500,00
Resources . . . $4,000,0(
Northwest Corner Main' a
Huron Streets
707 North University Ave

"Just a Little BETTER"
ICE CREAM
for all occasions

wa

TRU
218 S. M

Wlu . L,
ink of the Sears, e x-20,- Earns Navy Promotion
ity several. William Sears, ex-'20, who enlisted
his winter. after the declaration of war, is now
chief petty officer in the regular navy,
and is located at the United States
WALK naval .training station, Bay Shore, L.
sidewalk? I. Sears is in, complete charge of all
ing pedes- the boats which accompany the air-
ce, and go planes on their flights for rescue work.
Los a mut- He is- a member of Delta Kappa Epsi-
ld in gen- Ion fraternity.
particular?
ady to get Rogers Receives Corporal's Warrant
cold with Randolph Rogers, ex-'20, who enlist-
nge up in ed in the army last June, recently re-
Remember ceived his warrant as corporal. Rog-
hiown you; ers is in Company K, 38th United
ew blotter States regulars, and is a member of
match re- the Delta Kappa Epsilon fraternity.
her wom- Recreation makes for Efficiency.

U;

Ralph E. Gault, '19, Engaged
Announcement has been made of the
engagement of Ralph E. Gault, '19, to
Miss Jessie L. Fleming, ex-'18, ow- a
senior at the New England Conserva-
tory of Music. Gault is a member of the
Eremites club, and Miss Fleming of
Sigma Alpha Iota sorority.

Classes

LADIES Save from $5 to $25
on Suits, Coats and Furs by ordering now at

11

11

Rugs cleaned and washed. Satisfac-
tion guaranteed. Koch and Henne.-
Adv.
U. of M. Jewelry. J. . Chapman's

ZWERDLING'S
Exculusive Ladies' Tailor rnd Frrier
217 E: Liberty St, Zwerdlii

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