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January 16, 1918 - Image 1

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1918-01-16

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

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ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN, W EDNESDAY, JANUARY 16 1918.

',, ,- t

POSTERS
FOR

WANTED
"LET'S GO"

For Cast and Chorus Will
Be Held Again
Tonight

U.S. TO PUT' NEW
21 'S U NDE R 0DRAFT
Government Decides Against Raising
Limit Above 31 Years of
Age
MAY USE NATIONAL ARMY
TROOPS FOR HARVEST WORK

SENATE VOTES TO,
RETAIN ATHLETICS

IF

FRESH LIT NOTICE

-.,-.--

I.

The poster contest for the 1918
Union opera, "Let's Go," opens today.
Campus artists who intend to submit
drawings will meet at 7 o'clock to-
night at the Union, where Alan V-
Livingston, '18E, general chairman of
the opera, will read them a synopsis
of the play.
Cast try-outs and chorus rehearsals
and try-outs will be held at 7:30 o'-
clock this evening at the Union. Those
who have previously tried out for the
cast need not be present, as there is
no cast rehearsal. There will, how-
evertbe bothstry-outs and rehearsals
for the chorus.

Resolution To Contrary Gets
Much Opposition By
Faculty

Too

INTERCOLLEGIATE GAMES STILL
PART OF MICHIGAN'S PROGRAM

Eliminate Alien Population From
timates for Draft
Quotas

Es. Arguments

Used Voice Opinions
Administration
Heads

of

Freshmen of the literary col-
lege will be excused from 10
o'clock classes this morning,
with the consent of the depart-
ments involved, to attend the
second fresh lit assembly of the
year; in University Hall . Prof.
C. H. VanTyne, who was in
France and England just before
the war, will lecture on "Unit-
ed States and the War."
JOHN R. EFFINGER,
Dean.
UNIVERSITY OFFICILS
GIVE' CITY MORE COA

LA

OT

NT STRUGGES
ROus OPEN

U

W FALLS AGGREVATE
N RESULTING FROM
BLIZZARD

ishington, Jan. 15.- Against the
t general snow and ice storm of
neration, the government railroad
inistration today struggled in an
t to open main travelled routes
keep coal and food shipments mov-
ver the lines best able to handle
e situationatonight was regarded
orse than at any time within the
week of traffic paralyzing weath-
On top of an accumulation of
v in the middle west from bliz-
s of several days ago camne freshI

were rising in most
but it was not warm
se cars frozen to sid-
ase thousands of cars
ht; believe it would be
f days before sone in-f
be forced to close by
fuel. Measures are be-
afeguard domestic and
eeds, and to distribute
> the most essential in-

Washington, Jan. 15.-The govern-
ment has decided on draft registra-
tion of all young- men as fast as they
become 21 years old as the means of
keeping filled the "ranks of the war
army. It has decided against raising
the draft age limit above 31 years.
Draft New Men
An administration bill was introduc-
ed today at the request of the war de-
partment by Chairman Chamberlain of
the senate 'military committee, to reg-
ister for draft all men who have reach-
ed 21 since June 5, 1917, when the
draft law became effective. The ad-
ministration's support seemed to as-
sure its prompt passage.
Army to Aid Work
Other administration bills introduced
today at the request of the war depart-
ment will supplement the draft law to
make it workable under conditions
that have developed. One would per-
mit furloughing of national army
troops for harvest work, or other civ-
ilian duties; another would eliminate
enemy alien population from basis of
population for draft quota, by making
the basis for each state the number of
men available in class one,
PRUDDE N ORDERS
LESS USE OF COAL
Light and Heat Used by Business
Pl0es Limited to Nine
Hours
Lansing, Mich., Jan, 15,-Declaring
that the fuel situation In Michigan is
such t mat conservation by every pos-
sible means has become imperative,
State Fuel Adminlotrator Prudden late,
today issued drastic orders to impel
curtailment in the use of coal. The
orders, which become effective Jan.
17, affect almost every form of com-
mercial activity, as well as churches,
clubs and street lighting.
/ Limited Hours-
The use of heat and light in retail
and wholesale stores, office buildings
and "all places of business" i limited
to nine consecutive hours on all week
days except Satur arywhek a limited
12 hours i4 allowed. The closing hopr
must not be later than 10 o.'lock.
Restaurants and lunch rooms 10ow
operating 24 hours are included in the
order but eating places may be oper-
ated during the nine hours at night, if
permission is obtained from the may-
or.
Complete closing of theaters and
motion picture houses on Monday and
.Tuesday of each week is required and
on other days the hours for operation
shall not be In excess of fIve hours.
They are required to close not later
than 11 o'clock.
Churches are allowed to be heated
six hours a week.
Bars Must Close at 10
Bars and cafes must close at 10
o'clock. Outside advertising signs are
entirely prohibited. Inside lighting in
stores after closing hours is limited to
"safety lights." Lighting of streets,
parks and boulevards is to be conned
to necessary lights for safety.
Mr. Pruden estinates that strict
obervence ot $he regulations will re-
sul in a daly saving of 1tf09- tons
Food 1pon*y Required By Congress
Washington, Jan. 1.-StrIcter econ-
omy of food is to be required of the
American people by new. laws put in
the making today in congress.

That Michigan will not drop her
intercollegiate athletics this year, was
the decision reached by the University
senate late Monday night.
The resolutiondadvocating the dis-
continuance of athletics which was
presented to the senate for consider-
ation at the November meeting failed
to pass at this time by an almost un-
animous vote. The resolution stated: -
The Resolution
"Wherea*) the unprecedented ex-
pansion of industry and the great in-
crease of food products occasioned by
our entry into the great war, together
with the necessity of transporting
men,m milio s, and foo. t .Furope,
have so taxed our transportation re-
sources as to cause shortages of fuel
and stable foods in our home cities,
and to menace our chances of win-
ning the war; and
Whereas, the proper demands upon
all to support the Liberty Loans, Red
Cross, the army Y. M. C. A., and other
organizations and Institutions, must
introduce hardships in meeting the
assessments which have been regular-
made upon students for the support
of athletics; be it therefore
"Resolved, that the University Sen-
ate recommends to the Board of Re-
gents that, with the close of the pres-
ent season, ' intercollegiate athletics
at the University of Michigan be dis-
continued for the period of the war."
Arguments Voiced
It was pointed out at the meeting
that since the government has taken
charge of the railways, it can prohibit
the use of the roads for transpor-
ting crowds at any time. It was
also stated that the government had
encouraged athletics at the various
training camps, and notably, had not
abolished athletics at West Point and
Annapolis. In this connection, letters
were read from President Wilson,
Secretary Daniels and Secretary Bak-
er, expressing favorAby the continu-
ance of intercolleglate athletics. .
DELAYED INLANDER
APPEARS TOMORROW
"Dona Fereintes," Street Walt Story,
heads List of Fea.
tures
The Inlander will not go on sale
today as was announced, due to un-
avoidable delay, but will appear on the
campus tomorrow morning.
"Dona Ferentes," a story of street
waifs, by Catherine Connell, '18, and a
fairy story by Katherine Harrington,
'18, are featured in the January num-
ber, as well as "P. N. R.," a short
story, and two poems by Muriel Bab-
cock, grad., and Allis Hussey, '21..
STUDENT COUNCIL CHOOSES
OFFICERS FOR NEW SEMESTER
C. A. D{art, .'1$,, was elected presi-
dent of the Student council for. the en
suing semester at a meeting held in
the White studio yesterday at noon.
The council met at that time to have
their picture taken for the Michigan-
ensian and while waiting proceeded
with the semi-annual election.
The other officers are: James I.
McClintock, '19, vice-president; A. W.
Boyd, '18, recording secretary; E. E.
Raymond, '18E, corresponding secre-
tary; H. C. Kramer, '18D, treasurer;
and E. C. Baumgarten, '18D, auditor.

PRIVATE FAMILIES TIDED
COLD SPELL BY
ACTION

The University again relieved Ann
Arbor's coal shortage by giving 50 tons
more to the city, making a total of- 150
tons now turned over by Regent Jun-
ius E. Beal, local fuel administrator.

Second

OVER

"The situation is tided ovr . tnat time, the
for this cold wave, as far as private visable to to
families are concerned," said Thomas will not be
O'Brien, acting chief of police, last n the spring,
night. "Thanks to the University and
Mr. Beal the immediate trouble is al- Semester
leviated. It is the manufacturers that The second
will now feel the shortage most ser- bagin the olk
iously." ' may take mo

Begins

and

COUNTY ASKED TO RAISE
$(lO00,000 IN STAMP CAMPAIGN
Plans for the thrift stamp sale cam-
paign will be discussed at a meeting
of the committee in charge to be held
Thursday noon at the city Y. M. C. A.
[t is the aim of this committee under
the leadership of Mr. Francis Bacon,
'02, and Mr. H. J. Abbott, to raise
$1,000,000 in Washtenaw county
through - the sale of these stamps.
Headquarters ar tod e opened in the
city Y. M. C. A. building.

Classes in the engin
will continue.-up to the
night of the semester
weeks set aside for ex
is customary. Each in
give the examinations d
ular meetings of the ch
and time being left er
own discretion. The f
this resolution yesterday
NO Early Disi
Because of the lapse o
the semesters that usi
the efficiency of the co
cause the students prac

Factories Needy s.oilit
H. D. Runciman, one of the manag- sibilty
ers of the Hoover Steel Ball company, place be
stated last night that there seemed to semeste
be no relief in view for them. "We are
closed indefinitely," said Mr. Runci- The 1
man. "The situiation is unchanged, hold ex
and we have no coal in prospect. Cer- not Toll
tainly we cannot run without fuel." ing colt
The efforts of the company to get ations f
the delivery of coal for which they had announ
contracted earlier in the season have
failed due to the congestion in trans- Given
portation. J. C.
The Parker Manufacturing company home in
has about one day's supply on hand as the
and no hopes of getting more. heavy s
Other manufacturing plants are in attempt
the same predicament, and while many Ann -A
have sufficient amounts on hand for Giffen
a few days there is no prospect of re- accordin
plenishing their supply. he woul
Deliveries Delayed side of
Mr. O'Brien stated that deliveries driftedr
have been further hampered by the any hea
storms of the past week which have will be
been of a general character and that for abo
still greater quantities of coal are
needed to heat homes properly. German
The cars of coal, expected from To-
ledo this week by Mr. Beal have not With
yet arrived, but it is hoped that this Jan. 15.
allotment will come by the last of the ing an
week to -act as a supplement to the ican av
loan of the University. nearest
Duri
D. A. C. Gets Churchill Painting sions th
Detroit, Jan. 15.-"The Brunette within2
Venus," Julius Rolshoven's famous oring t
painting, which has hung for years in they dr

Istrat !

storm Saturday
ting to motor
.rbor.
n had spent Fr
ig to his brott
id be able to ge
the .city he -
roads and was
adway. It is e
unable to res
ut two weeks.

if a

;

the America
.-Enemy air
increased int
iatian centei
the lines-.

nged to two
o'3loek on
Course 36
ruesday and
in editorial

* *

iam T. F
rtland, 0
ock, in Hi
noon, in
:ience aud

* * * *
*
*
oster of *
re., will *
ill audi- *
stead of *
itorium *
:ed. The *
will be *
military *
.d. The *
so invit- *

Dr. Florrer Writes Volume of Essays
Dr. W. W. Florrer of the German de-
partment, has written a series of es-
says that have been collected, under
the title, "German Liberty Authors,"
"The Attituide of Modern German Writ-
ers Toward Religion," and "Bismark,"
are perhaps the most noteworthy of
the essays, the latter being an epic'
poem which treats of the struggles of
the German people for democracy, in
the nineteenth century. Other titles
-are "Gustav Freenssen," and "Shill-
er's Conception of Liberty."
Emma Goldman's Speech Postponed
Emma Goldman will not appear on-
Saturday of this week, as previously
announced, and her final address will
have to be indefinitely postponed.
The United States supreme court
has upheld her conviction for con-
spiring with Alexander Berknja to
obstruct operation of the draft law,
and as a result she 'will he escorted'
by a United States marshal to Jeffer-
son, Mo., federal penitentiary, to sere
two years.

the back room of - Churchil's 158 w
Woodward avenue, his been presented i
to the Detroit Athletic club. The n
painting was considered one of Rol- c
shoven's best nudes, and was highly c
prAised by London critics when it
hung in a place of honor-in the rooms *
of the Pastel society in London. It *
was thought that the original pur- *
chase price was $10,000. For 15 years *
the picture has hung in the sequest- *
ered lounge room of Churchill's, 11- *
luminated by dim lights. Mr. Preston, *
the owner of the picture, has refused *
$20,000 for the painting. -
*

;lose
ans

to ma
ropped

vhich in mIi
n which-the
ately the G

,

lt-medi
be elect
courses.
itary tr,

Catherine Connell Elected to Stylus
Catherine Connell, '18, author of
"Dona Ferentes," which appears in
the Inlander this month, has been
elected a member of Stylus, honorary
literary society for women.

*
*
*

*'

*

."

* * x- :

tDamrosch"

Orchestra

A,

P. M.

--90

PLAYERS-

-

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