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October 06, 1917 - Image 2

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1917-10-06

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

THE MICHIGAN DAILY "'1",' L

rr
_ 1

U e ki~an Dally
MEMBER"ASSOCIATED PRESS
Official newspaper at the University of
Michigan . Published every morning except
Monday during the university year.
Entered at the postoffice at Ann Arbor as
second-class matter.
Offices : Ann Arbor Press Building. Sub-
scriptions: by carrier, $2.50; b mail, $3.00.
Want ad stations: Quarry's; Students' Sup.
ply Store; The Delta. Phones: Business, 960;
Editorial, 2414.4
Communications not to exceed Soo words
in length, or notices of events will be pub-
lished in The Daily, at the discretion of the
Editor, if left at the office in the Ann Arbor
Press Bldg., or in the notice box in the west
corridor of the general library, where the
notices are collected at 7:30 o'clock each
evening-
Robert T. McDonald.......Managing Editor
C. Philip Emery..........Business 'Manager
Harold Makinson......Advertising Manager
Paul E. Cholette.......Publication Manager
Bernard Wohl..........Circulation Manager
Harold R. Smith.......... .Credit Manager
Wm. M. LeFevre...........Office Manager
J. Ellsworth Robinson.. Subscription Manager'
NIGHT EDITORS
Bruce A. Swaney James Schermerhorn, Jr.
Harry Carey C. S. Clark, Jr.
Clarence L. Roeser

BASEBAL TRINING HELPS
IN THROWIN GGRENADES5
Y. M. C. A. WILL FURNISH CAMP
CUSTER WITH 175 TEACH-
ERS
(Special to The Daily)
Camp Custer, Mich., Oct. 5.-Due to

I WfomenI

REPORTERS
Albert E. Horne, Jr.T Bruce Millar
Philip C. Pack Harry W. Weinerman
" Denman 'H. Cruttenden Edgar L. Rie
Mildred C. Mighell Mark K. Ehlbert
Eugene Given
BUSINESS STAF
L. A. Storrer Orville E. Gates
Wm. A. Leitzinger . Harry D. Hause
Dale H. Baad Lambert Hirsheimer
SATURDAY, OCTOBER 6, 1917.
Issue Editor-Russell Barnes
LET'S HELP HIM
Yesterday afternoon P r e s i d e n t
Hutchins gave an address to the fresh-
men and sophomores in which he
stated his objections to hazing. The
principal reason for the objection to
hazing which he advanced is that it
gives Michigan a bad name.
Hzing as it has been conducted on
State street the past few nights is but
little better than mob rule. The
person with the loudest voice and the
roughest manner becomes the leader.
Our psychological instinct is to follow
with the rest of the "gang." Things
started with the idea of a little fun
soon degenerate into conduct that we
are ashamed of when we reach home
to think it over.
But the big thing is that we are
" hurting ourselves and others by our
conduct. We enjoy at the University
many advantages made possibly by the
tax-payers of the state of Michigan.
And the man who is primarily respon-
sible for these advantages .of late is
President Hutchins. He has done
much among the alumni for Michigan,
one thing being his work for the new
Michigan Union building.
Let's help him. He's our friend.
And the best way we can show our
appreciation of him is by heeding the
advice given to us yesterday.
MORE THAN A FOOTBALL GAME
Today's clash with Case means more
thant the usual first game of a sea-
son. The 1916 opener simply started
off a year in which the Maize and
Blue was mainly without friends and
natural territorial enemies.
Michigan is this afternoon begin-
ning her first contest as a member of
the Big Ten. She has alliances, ter-
ritorial foes and natural rivals she
will strive to conquer. The fight is
more furious than for 10 years-since
Michigan broke away from the Big
.Nine. Her handicaps are great. She
has lost many stars. But so have the
rest.
Today's contest is more than a prac-
tice for Yost. The other Conference
schools are now his actual rivals.
They are watching him, and the whole
country with them.
How many of the soph hazers wore
pots last year?
The word "Please" is printed on
stakes placed around the campus for
a purpose.
The equinoctial came a little late.
And now England is planning for
another one of those successful
"comeback parties.''
Slacker's False Exemption Recalled
"My husband has no dependents. He
doesn't support me and the child
here," a woman sobbed Thursday in
the local draft board office.
The man had been granted an ex-
emption claim to support his family
but the board immediately took steps
to revoke his exemption. He will re-
port for 'national army service in Bat-
tle Creek at the next call.

i - - -- -- -_ __ _ __ __ _ __ .._ __... .. .. . ..= -.

the natural training that every Am-
erican boy has in throwing a base-
ball, and grenade throwing is ex-
pected to prove an easy accomplish-
ment to the soldiers of the 85th divis-
ion stationed at Camp Custer.
Mr. S. T. Bailey, former squash and
handball coach at the Detroit Ath-
letic club has been appointed grenade
officer of the division. Mr. Bailey has
been at Fort Sill, Okla., where he
took an advanced course in throwing
and manufacturing hand grenades.
He there studied high explosives, the
different kinds of bombs which will
be used by the American army, the
manufacture of emergency missiles
and the manner of throwing.
As the skillful use of the hand gren-
ade in trench warfare is of the ut-
most and of an ever increasing im-
portance, the greater proficiency of
the American soldier in throwing the
grenades will do much toward making
him a more effective fighter than the
'European, is the opinion of army of-
ficials. As soon as a site is selected
the work will begin with throwing of
dummies, to be followed later by live
bombs.
Professor Henderson Promises Help
Prof. William D. Henderson of the
University of Michigan has promised
the Y. M. C. A. 175 teachers and lec-
turers who will co-operate with the
various "Y" instructors, so that the
camp will not be lacking in intellectu-
al opportunities. The need for the
education of the illiterate soldiers,
who are mostly foreigners, has been
greatly felt so that classes in English
will be started as soon as. text books
arrive.
Arrangements are being made to
float a part of the new Liberty loan
in small denominations among the
soldiers. It is believed that a plan
will be evolved whereby they can be
bought on monthly payments. An ar-
rangement must also be outlined in
which assignments of pay are made
to the treasury department so tha
the latter may look to the war depart-
ment for the money.
Spicy Nelvs from
Other Colleges
Did you ever see a surveyor doin
his work with a toothpick and denta
floos? Well, that's the way they do i
at Ohio State university. This yea
the initiations although few are fun
nier and more fantastic than ever.
Movies as usual! This was th
decision reached by the union boar
at Indiana university last week. Th
movies are to be given in the Unio
Photoplay theater and are always o
very good quality.
Test your child by the Binet sys
tem and see if he is able to be a col
lege professorordshould start wor]
at once on the ditch digging gang
This sounds rather cold blooded but i
atually being carried out with grea
success at the University of Kansa
All the school children at Lawrenc
are being tested. The results sho
that three per cent are unable to car
ry on the work and 15 per cent ar
doing it under tremendous handicap
Attending a meeting of the boar
of trustees of a state universit
seems rather, a prosaic proceedin
but the way Charles Kettering a mem
ber of the board on the Ohio Stat
university does it is quite a differeni
matter. Last Tuesday persons o
the campus were attracted by the hu
of- an airplane high in the air. The
supposed that it was connected wit

the government school at Dayton, bu
is was only Mr. Kettering attendin
his meeting. He used a "Little Scout
Wright airplane and flew from Dayto
and back,a distance of 140 miles.
You can get into a Davis shirt fo
$1.25 to $3.00. S. 0. Davis, 119
'Main.-Adv.
Have those rooms decorateda
once, you have them to look at for
year. C. H. Major & Co.-Adv.

Women's league board meeting at
9 o'clock this morning in Barbour
gymnasium.
A meeting for all University women
interested in general social service
work will be held at 3:30 o'clock Mon-
day afternoon at Newberry hail.
Mrs. C. E. Hillis will speak at 4:15
o'clock tomorrow afternoon at the city
Y. W. C. A. vesper service.
Athletic association tag day will bet
Tuesday, Oct. 9. The mass meeting
will take place at 4 o'clock in Bar-
bour gymnasium.
Drawings for the tennis tournament
will be made Tuesday, hour to be an-
nounced later.
The dues for the. new athletic as-
sociation are 25 cents.
FIRST LECTURE IN SERIES
GIVEN MEDICS AND LAWS
Clarence A. Lightner. A. X., Talks
to Juniors and Seniors on
Common Subject
"Medical jurisprudence is that
technical subject which applies med-
ical knowledge and experience to the
administration of the law in its jud-
icial aspect," said Clarence A. Lig'. t-
ner, A. M., yesterday afternoon i1; the
first of his series of lectures b rore
the junior and senior medical and
law students,
The lectures will be given in room
C of the Law building. Their titles
are "What the Subject is and What
it is Not," "Medical Witnesses." "The
Physician's Privilege," "The Physi
ian's Relation to the Law-His Duties
and Liabilities," "The Physician's
Relation to -the Law-His Rights,"
"Personal Injury Litigation," 'Insur-
ance," "Insanity and Inebriety-Crin -
a inal Aspect," "Insanity and Inebrity-
* Civil Aspects," and "Poisons (Toxiol-
ogy)".
All those studens of the seconJ and
third year in law desiring to attend
x the lectures should leave their names
' with the clerk and receive an "Outline
of the Course on Medical Jurisiyu
ence."

1

STUDENTS RESPONSIBLEj
TO CITY FOR CONDUCT
CITY MARSHALL SAYS COLLEGE
LAWS NOT ALL THAT
BINDS MEN
"University students are not respon-
sible for conduct to the University
alone, they are also amenable to the
city ordinances," declared Thomas
O'Brien, acting city marshall. "We
treat the students with tolerance, but
all violations of the ordinances will
meet with the usual penalties."
Several regulations which directly
affect students while residents of Ann
Arbor have been compiled by the po-
plice and forbid riding bicycles on
sidewalks, playing ball in the streets,
tacking signs on telegraph or tele-
phone poles and driving machines
faster than 10 miles per hour within
the city limits.
Driving a taxi or dray without a
license, and opening the muffler on an
automobile while within the limits or
parking any vehicle within 25 feet of
a hydrant makes the violator liable to
prosecution.
Bull dogs must be muzzled as well
as licensed. All dogs must at all
times wear a license tag.
"We don't anticipate any trouble
in enforcing the rules," said Mr.
O'Brien, "this is merely the warning,
'ignorance of the law,' you know, is
no excuse."
World's Greatest Wireless Installed
The most powerful wireless station
in the world has just been opened in
Honolulu this week. It broke the rec-
ord for long distance wireless in com-
municating with Secretary of the Navy
Daniels at Sayville on Long Island,
a distance of 5,000 miles.
We are decorating some of the best
homes in the city. Call 237. C. H.
Major & Co.-Adv.

A f' airi i 1L14iLiLi a aLi l f < ii

,t
it
1. 1
Ii
d
t
le
d
n d
f
The Corset
- Is the Foundation
-
Your college outfit starts
s with a
t
e
r-
e Your figure will be graceful,
s. and you will have distinct
style, irrespective of simplicity
d in dress, and your health as-
y sured.
9, Moreover, a Redfern
- Model is so ideally com-
Le fortable, fitting so natur-
nt ally that its wearer may
'n do any athletic stunt as
easily as she dances,
y rides or walks, in her
h corset.
ut
Ig Be sure to have your Redfern
t" Corset properly fitted before
n you choose your suits and
frocks-then their correct
appearance is assured.
or
s. $3.50 up
at At all high class stores
a

I
a

Here's Your
Hat
Direct from the C & K
Shops
We are showing all the new
shades in the
New Soft Finish

®--

i r4 5 ,
"r "
r
r: y'
3jt
t
..
/

Let us show you
one
That Soft
Crushable Kind
you like so well

Agents for the
C & K, Knapp Felt and
Dobbs Fifth Ave.
Hats

I

Better let us have your order
early for that
New Fall Suit and Overcoat
We are sure to please you in price, fabrics,
fit and style from the
Kahn Tailored Line
$25 to $50
Everything Wearable for Young Men
Tinker & Company

Clothes, Haberdashery and Hats

324 S. State at William St.

1

_

DANCE AT THE

Special
Sunday]

Banquets

Evening DELTA
Luncheons

CA FE Dinner Dances
CAFE University Luncheons

CORNER STATE AND PACKARD

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