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October 06, 1917 - Image 1

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1917-10-06

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WEATHER
DER; PROBABLE
RAIN TODAY

rop i, tEt19an

:43 xtl

ASSOCIATED
PRESS
DAY AND NIGHT WERE
SERVICE

rML. No. 4.

ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN, SATURDAY, OCTOBER 6, 1917.

PRICE THREE CENTS

1 I

FRESHIEN HOLD
MAS~METIN6IN
HILL AUITORIUM
SONGS, YELLS AND TRADITIONS
ARE TAUGHT FIRST YEAR
MEN
JNIVERSITY LIFE IS
EXPLAINED FULLY
Prf. William D. Henderson Urges
New Spirit of Universal
Patriotism
Boardng the old "Locomotive" with
rush, and ripping out a "Rah, Michi-
ian, Rah," the class of '21 last night
lemonstrated to the campus that
Liough the Varsity may be cheerlead-
rless, it surely will not be cheerless.
'he occasion was the yearlings' first
nass meeting, given in Hill audi-
orium by the Michigan Union, and
ollowed by a reception at the Union.
When the hour for the opening of
hie meeting had arrived, the entire
enter section of the auditorium was
lied with an orderly crowd of about
,000 freshmen, but when pictures of
parks, Weske, Wieman, and Boyd
ere flashed on the screen, their re-
erve was broken, and from then on
o check was given to their en-
iusiasm. Led by Red Donnelly, '18L,
iey practiced all the yells.
Under the direction of Kenneth N.
Westerman, and accompanied by the
arsity band, the yearlings rehearsed
I1 the songs.
Attwood Speaks
S. S. Attwood, '18E, president of the
iudent council, who acted as chair-
an of the evening, welcomed the new
ien on behalf of the University, and
troduced Prof. Ralph W. Aigler of
e Law school as the first speaker.
Prof. Aigler explained in detail the
ork of the various governing bodies
which the student at Michigan is
3countable for his actions, and then
ent on to describe the place of the
ichigan Union and the University Y.
. C. A. in campus life.
The military situation within the
niversity was then taken up by Lieut.
eorge C. Mullen. "The United States
overnment wants to make all of you
aders of men in fighting for your
)untry," said Lieutenant Mullen.
New Patriotism
In the closing speech of the meet-
*g, Prof. William D. Henderson, of
te physics department, declared that
ie present generation was living un-
r a new spirit of patriotism.
[hough not called into the service
our country, there are many ways
t which we can show our patriotism,"
dd Prof. Henderson.
At the close the freshmen marched
a body to the ,Michigan Union,
here smokes 'and punch were on
and for them. Here another "pep"
stival was conducted with H. E.
;orz, '19, as leader.
SOPHOMORE TURNS THIS IN
FOR FRESHMEN TO READ
uce there was a freshman who
wouldn't wear his cap;
e said that he could beat up any
soph'more on the map;
ut one night they came and got him,
and they showed him what was
what,

ad they made the freshman promise
he would always wear his "pot";
o, freshmen, wear your little caps
whene'er you go about,
For the sophomores'll get you if you
don't watch out!"

Drill Suits To Bie
U. S, Army Style
Measurements for Uniforms to Start
Immediately; Government to
Provide Money
Uniforms will be furnished by the
government to all of the students en-
rolled in Lieut. G. C. Mullen's mili-
tary course. The uniforms will be
worn in the class room, on the cam-
pus, and during drill periods.
The color of the cloth is identical
with that of the regulation army uni-
form, being of olive drab. The style
and cut will also be the same as those
worn in the United States army.
Measurements for the suits will
commence as soon as all the men are
enrolled. It is expected that the final
preparations and government specifi-
cations will arrive within the next six
weeks.

I
of

QUIZ LAFOLLETTE ,
Five-hour Discussion in Senate to Give
War Congress Dramatic
Ending
SUB-COM3ITTEE TAKES UP
SENATOR'S ST. PAUL SPEECH

Stone of Missouri Exempted
Similar Investigations,
Reported

from

ANOTHER SWATCH
O'BERNSTORFF'S WAY

Expose Throws ,dditional Light
German Diplomatic
Service

on

Washington, Oct. 5.-More of Count
von Bernstorff's confidential cable ex-
changes with the Berlin foreign. of-
fice were made puble by the state de-
partment tonight furnishing docu-
mentary proof of the extraordinary
activities of Bolo Pasha, now a pris-
oner in France, and throwing light
upon the charges against the German
diplomatic service.
Signed by Von Bernstorff and by
Von Jagow, then foreign minister, the
message shows 'that $1,700,000 which
the ambassador had placed to the
credit of Yugo Schmidt, a representa-
tive of the Deutche bank at New York,
was sought as a¢loan to a leading po-
litical personality in France. It was
counted upon to bring peace.

PROSPECTS FOR VARSITY
BAND SAID TO BE

GOODI

"The prospects for the band this
year are exceedingly good," said Cap-
tain Wilson. An unusually large num-
ber of cornet players have turned out
and competition is keen for the regu-
lar positions.
At the first rehearsal Wednesday
night 125 men appeared for trial, 60
of which will be chosen for regular
berths after the preliminary tryouts.
Captain Wilson also made the an-
nouncement that the uniforms this
year would remain unchanged.
PROFESSORS SERVING IN
NEW UNITED STATES ARMY
Dr. Udo J. Wile, professor of
dermatology, and Dr. Nellis B. Foster,
professor of internal medicine, are
now serving in the new army. Dr.
Joseph Elliott and Dr. Lewis H. New-
burgh will take charge of the respec-
tive departments.
Major Victor C. Vaughan, dean of
the Medical school, and certain repre-
sentatives of the French and English
armies will deliver lectures on Thurs-
day and Saturday nights of next week.
Lansing Has Training, Too
Lansing, Mich., Oct. 5.-Following
the lead of Detroit and Flint, Lansing
is to have a course in military train-
ing in her schools under the new
state law requiring such training in
school districts of 5,000 or more popu-
lation, Superintendent J. W. Sexton
announced today. Superintendent Sex-
ton holds that the law does not specify
any given time for the inauguration
of the courses. Lansing's will begin
later in the year.
Superintendent Sexton says "mili-
tary training" is not defined in the
law and he prefers to wait until the
state says exactly what it expects of
the schools.-
Superintendent of Public Instruction
Fred L. Keeler held last'week it was
optional with the boards whether they
established military training at all,
despite the mandatory phrasing of the
law.
Cosmopolitan Club Is Unsettled
Owing to the confusion in the Ger-
man classes this year, the Cosmopoli-
tan club has not yet been'reorganized.
Prof. J. A. C. Hildner of the German
department will start plans for the or-'
ganizarion as soon as he is able to
take the time from his department.

Washington, Oct. 5.-Five hours'
discussion in the senate tomorrow of
disloyalty charges against Senator La
Follette will furnish a dramatic finale
for the war session of congress.
Arrangements were made today
after a senate committee had been di-
rected to investigate the Wisconsin
member's recent speech in St. Paul be-
fore the Non-Partisan league. With
the finale set for 3 o'clock this after-
noon, the last session of congress
promises to be devoted almost ex-
clusively to this question.
Under a formal agreement, Senator
La Follette will begin a three hours'
speech at 10 o'clock in defense of his
public utterances and in answer to
his critics, with two hours remaining
before the judgment, for the replies to
be made by Senator Kellog of Minne-
sota and possibly by others. In ex-
ecutive session laid today the senate
adopted a formal resolution impower-
ing the election of a sub-committee to
proceed with the investigation of the
La Follette speech at St. Paul.
A report of the committee against
investigation of similar disloyalty re-
flections on Senator Stone of Missouri
also was adopted. The report declared
that communications filed charging
disloyalty to Senator Stone were not
sufficient basis for an inquiry. Upon
receipt of an accurate copy promised
today by Senator La Follette of his
St. Paul speech the investigating com-
mittee of five members plans to begin
its work next week.
FEMALE BARBER IN BOSTON
ASKS JOB OF UNCLE SAM
Boston, Mass., Oct. 5.-A shiny new
barber equipment, bay rum, witch-
hazel and a female barber are all at
the service of Uncle Sam-if he wants
them.
Inspired by female patriots who are
serving their country, Mrs. Sadie A.
Kitchen, at present employed in a lo-
cal barber shop, today applied for en-
listment in the United States marine
corps here, but has not yet been ac-
cepted. Her case has been referred to
Washington for final action.
.So far, no women have been enlisted
in the marine corps, and men of all
trades who serve in special capacities
must first go through regular military
training. However, Mrs. Kitchen be-
lieves that "battalions of death," "am-
bulance drivers" and navy yeowomen
are sufficient precedents to influence
her case.
Plan to Protect the Children
Now that the schools are open and
the child labor law is in effect, the
woman's defense committee, through
its department of child welfare of
which Miss Bina M. West is chairman,
will act as a vigilance committee in
the interests of the children. It is rec-
ommended that each county chairman
be asked whether all the children be-
tween the ages of 6 and 14 are in
school, and whether there are any
children in need of scholarships that
they may attend school. All this in-
formation will be kept on file that
the Michigan woman's committee may
do its part in helping the national
committee in its co-operation with the
children's bureau to which the work
of enforcing the child labor law is
delegated.
Saginaw Man Weds Miss Helen George
Announcement has been made of
the marriage of Helen George, '17, of.
Ann Arbor to William Waller, '15, of
Saginaw, in July. Miss George is a
member of the Chi Omega sorority.
Mee is the name of a student at

Kansas university. When he ans-
wers the phone if often causes him
much embarrassment. Invariably the
voice at the other end of the line
asks, "Who is this?" And Mee answers
"This is Mee." Then the voice al-
ways says, "You should say, this is I."

Mlilitary Call To
Reach AllI Faculty
University Men to Meet Monday for
Special Instruction by Lieut.
G. C. Mullen
For the first time in the history of
the University every member of the
faculty will meet at 7:30 o'clock Mon-
day night in Waterman gymnasium
for special military instruction.
Lieut. G. C. Mullen of the United
States army recently sent letters to
every faculty member to be present
at this meeting. Any professor or
instructor of the University who de-
sires to assist in giving military in-
structions is especially urged to be
present.
No HARSHIPS IN COAL
SITUATION,_SAY DELERS
PRICES SAID TO BE AVERAGE
FOR CITIES THIS
SIZE
Although there is no hard coal to
speak of in any of the Ann Arbor
dealers' yards, it is not expected that
there will be any fuel hardships ex-
perienced this winter, if consumers
will buy slowly.'
Orders placed with the retailers as
early as June are just now being
filled in small carload lots.
Prices of coal in Ann Arbor are
about average for cities of its size
throughout the country. Hard coal
sold for $9.60, when it was available,
and there is a little chestnut coal left
in some yards. Soft coal retails for
$8.00 and Pocohantas, in varying
grades, has been selling at $8.00 to
$10.00.
Must Buy Reasonably
"I, do not believe that the city will
feel the pinch of the coal shortage un-
til late in the winter, if the consum-
ers will buy reasonably," said Mayor
Emmet M. Wurster Friday. "There
are no manufacturing plants affected
by the shortage as yet. The city has
its supply purchased and in the bins
for the winter, and enough to last un-
til next spring. Deliveries, so deal-
ers tell me, have been unusally slow.
Many deliveries of spring orders were
not filled until late last month."
The University has 20,000 tons of
fuel, mostly soft coal, purchased for
the winter supply. Lyman R. Flook,
assistant superintendent of buildings
and grounds at the University, said
that the soft coal was a trifle incon-
venient to use, but that when the con-
tract was let, the wholesalers would
not promise hard coal.
"As long as the people do not get
in a hurry to buy fuel in large
amounts and repeat the run of last
winter, I do not believe that there is
any need of worry over a serious
shortage this fall," declared I. W.
Cornwell, local dealer. "The opening
of navigation will no doubt start the
coal of the country on the move, and
we dealers look for an immediate re-
lief then."
GLENN COULTER AND HOWARD
TAYLOR DO NOT RETURN
The failure of Glenn M. Coulter,
'18L, and Howard S. Taylor, '18E,
to return to school has left two of
the three student positions on the
Board in Control of Student Publica-
tion open.

At an early meeting of the board,
appointments will be made to fill the
vacancies.
Coulter is with the United States
Ambulance corps at Allentown, Pa.
Taylor is at present in the employ of
a large steel construction concern. He
has sent in his application for admitt-
ance into the aviation department, but
has not yet been accepted. Waldo
McKee, '18E, is the only one of the
three in Ann Arbor at the present
time.
Woman's Committee Receives Aid
At the request of Dr. Anna Howard
Shaw, chairman of the Woman's com-
mittee, Council of National Defense;
Miss Helen W. Atwater of the home
economics office of the department of
agriculture, has been assigned to co-
operate with the woman's committee.
She will work in co-operation with the
sub-committee on home economics of
which Mrs. Stanley McCormich is
chairman.

Michigan Union Organizes to Sell
Bonds to Students and
Faculty
Liberty Loan executive committee of
the Michigan Union definitely organ-
ized yesterday with Mr. Francis Ba-
con, '02, as chairman; Registrar A. G.
Hall; RobertT. McDonald, '18; Prof.
I. Leo Sharfman, of the economics de-
partment; Prof. John C. Parker of the
engineering college; Stephen S. Att-
wood, '18E; Wilfred Shaw, secretary
L. Kessler, '17, and Dean Myra B.
Jordan. The executive committee
was subdivided into several com-
mittees having different functions
to perform. Professors Parker and
Sharfman were appointed on the cam-
paign committee which is to have a
definite program including the solicit-
ing of subscriptions among faculty
and students.
Stephen Attwood, '18E, was appoint-
ed chairman of the educational com-
mittee, the work of which will con-
sist of talks to the various student
bodies and organizations, explaining
the nature of the Liberty loan.
Mr. John A. Mosenfeldter, '17, in-
structor in the department of journal-
ism, was appointed chairman of the
publicity committee with Robert T.
McDonald, '18, Herbert G. Wilson, '18,
and Mrs. Kramer.
Committees to Sell Bonds to Students
These committees are to work on
the selling of bonds to the students
and faculty alone, the work being dis-
tinct from that of the city committee.
The city and University committees
will meet together at the Y. M. C. A.
banquet Monday night to discuss final
plans for co-operation.
In connection with the selling of
bonds at the banks, Governor Albert
E. Sleeper issued a call to all bank-
-ers throughout the state to assemble
at Lansing on Tuesday, Oct. 9, to dis-
cuss final plans for the sale of bonds
at the banking houses. George W. Mil-
len, chairman of the county commit-
tee, will go to Lansing together with
the presidents of the Farmers' and
Mechanics' bank, the Ann Arbor Sav-
ings and the State Savings banks to
attend this conference.
Mrs. W. H. Wait is planning the or-
ganization of the women of Washte-'
naw county for the Liberty Bond cam-
paign. Mrs. W. D. Henderson was
chosen chairman of the women's coun-
ty committee.
Leonard W. Nieter, '17, managing
editor of the Wolverine, during the
'pummer has been named in a list of
40 men called to appear for draft
board examination, Friday and Sat-
urday of next week.

DETROIT'S LIBERTY LOAN QUOTA
DECREASED $6,258000;,LARGE
CITIES LIBERAL IN SUBSCRIPTIONS
NEW YORK AND VICINITY SELLS $144,600,000 WORTH OF BONDS DUR-
ING FIRST FOUR DAYS OF CAMPAIGN; MAYOR
MITCHELL APP EALS TO CITIZENS

Colonel Theodore Roosevelt to Speak
in Detroit Soon for
Fund
Detroit, Oct. 5.-F. R. Fenton, De-
troit chairman for the federal reserve
district, notified the executive commit-
tee Friday night, that Detroit's Lib-
erty loan issue quota had been re-
duced from $50,000,000 to $42,742,006.
Subscriptions to the loan' took a
sudden flux Friday morning, upon the
announcement in a treasury bulletin
that the government surtax will not
apply to Liberty loan bonds purchased
in amounts under $15,000.
Col. Theodore Roosevelt will speak
in Detroit- in behalf of the fund some
time next week, and the committee is
waiting for him to set the day. For
this reason, the big Detroit drive has
been postponed until Monday.
Boy Scouts and high school students
have volunteered to distribute loan
posters in the city and Walker & Co.,
bill posters, have donated their bill-
boards throughout Wayne county and
city for the publicity department of
the loan fund campaign.
In Michigan, Fred L. Keeler, state
superintendent of public instruction,
has ordered that the meaning of the
Liberty loan bond issue be taught in
all English classes during October.
New York Sells $144,000,000 Worth
New York and vicinity announced
$144,000,000 as the total of bonds in
the first four days of the campaign.
Small investors are being appealed to
by the campaign committee to raise
the quota of a billion and a half dol-
lars by Oct. 27. The appeal calls for
the purchase of approximately $200
worth by every grown man and wom-
an in the district. Millions of small
subscriptions are needed. Mayor
Mitchell in a proclamation issued
Thursday asked the citizens of New
York to maintain the reputation of
the city made during the last cam-
paign by the liberal purchase of this
issue.
Farmers are being asked to buy the
loa. because it will keep them pros-
perous, making the United States and
her allies victorious-the loss of the
war means depression of markets and
perhaps worse, authorities are telling
them.
In a recent campaign bulletin, the
Chicago district states that the float-
ing of the Liberty loan should not be
such a difficult matter, if the wealth
of this nation means anything. The
statement shows that the wealth of
Great Britain, France and Germany
amounts to $227,500,000,000, while that
of the United States aggregates $250,-
000,000,000.

D RECEIVE ONE HOUR'S
IT FOR MILITARY DRILL
idents who elect the course
y training will receive one
edit each semester. A num-
e students have enrolled for
e. Military drill in the Law
s quite intensive last year.

KALAMAZOO UNIT AI1)S IN
CAMP CUSTER HOSPITALITIES
Co-operating with theYoung Wom-
en's Christian association in securing
residence locations for the families of
the officers and men at Camp Custer,
the Kalamazoo unit of the women's de-
fense committee has given the use of
the automobiles at its service for the
purpose of taking the wives of these
men to the homes opened for their use
in Kalamazoo. The chairman of theI
.Kalamazoo unit is also effecting the
organization of a federation of wom-
en's church organizations. One of the
features of the work to be undertaken
by this federation will be hospitality
to the boys at Camp Custer, opening
the homes, and the church houses to
the boys and their friends.
Has Collection to Illustrate Course
Dr. Henry Kraemer, new professor
of pharmacognosi, has been assigned a
room in the Natural Science building
for his collection of illustrative ma-
terial for his courses. Lantern slides,
photographs and actual specimens
constitute the new collection which in
the aggregate numbers several thou-
sand pieces.

TOMMIES INTRENCH
Prepare for New Drive on Kaiser;
Germans Suffer Heavy
Losses
With the British securely in-
trenched in all the positions they won
Thursday along the eight-mile front
of the Ypres sector, Field Marshal
Haig's men were busy Friday con-
solidating their newly won positions
and preparing for another drive into
the German line.
In addition to the enormous casual-
ties inflicted on the Germans, the Brit-
ish captured 4,446 men and 114 of-
ficers in Thursday's attack. Compara-
tive quiet reigned on the other fronts.
Apparently the Teutonic allies in Ro-
mania, after several weeks of inac-
tivity, again are preparing to attempt
to force back the Russo-Romanian
line.
Professors from the University of
Iowa are giving t-ducation courses at
Camp Dodge, training grounds for
the national army. The courses are
in connection with the "Y"'and will
be kept up indefinitely so that men
may better themselves in a education-
al way while they are in training.

S FOR SUMMER
BEING PREPARED
the 1918 summer
prepared. All those
I should leave their
secretary and should
e courses desired.

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