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This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

November 22, 1917 - Image 5

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1917-11-22

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

OM E.
)Y IN

iTI nirnp

A

you put on to keep

it" brings to your mind a picture of
;, comfortable outer garment that a
leaves his home-

LOCH and
LS-STERN

-five Dollars.

chmitt, Apfel Co.

IILUMU VVflI I t NUUL
LETTERS FROM CANTONMENTS
TO D. A. R. PROVE NECESSITY
FOR KNITTING
Sarah Caswell Angell chapter of the
Daughters of the American Revolu-
tion received definite proof at their
meeting this afternoon at the home of
Mrs. C. W. Gill, that knitted garments
were sorely needed by the soldiers.
Mrs. Willian H. Wait read official let-
ters from over a dozen cantonments in
which the women were assured of the
value of their work.'
"We have 28,591 men of all grades."
said one officer, "and so far we have
only about a dozen sweaters. Your
proposal, I need not say, is a most
cheerful one."
In the majority of letters a need of
sweaters was expressed and in all of
then the officers asked for socks.
"Socks wear out quickly because they
are more continually worn. We cer-
tainly need and appreciate the work,"
ran one of the letters.
Many personal incidents were then
related from first hand Inowledge of
the condition of the soldiers. "My
son wrote me," said one woman, "that
all he could say about his equipment
was that he hadn't any coat yet."
Another woman said she had receiv-
ed a letter from a boy whom she had
adopted in which he said, "If you
could see the way the boys pat and
hold and caress the socks which are
sent them you could ask no further3
proof of their appreciation."
Letters were then read from sailors
on the destroyer Paul Jones, which is
the special charge of the chapter, ex-
pressing their sincere thanks for the
garments already sent them. Plans
were made for increasing the supply
and also for Christmas boxes to be
sent to the men on the Paul Jones.
Music was furnished by Francis
Hamilton, Grace Johnson, and Dorothy
Wines, after which war refreshments
were served.
BOASTS TWO PRESIDENTS IN
HOME TOWN; MARINES SAY NO

Fifteen Smith college women, living
in frame shacks and sleeping on chick-
en wire mattresses, are doing re-
construction work in 14 French vil-
lages devastated by the Germans.
With headquarters at the ruined
chateau of Grecourt, they seek to sup-
ply the needs of hundreds of people
iving in demolished courtyards, among
heaps that were houses, in cellars, and
in stables. The unit is equipped with
a social service department, three
doctors, and a traveling store, which
goes through the villages distributing
kitchen outfits, clothes, and shoes. A
great deal of service is done among
the :children.
Letter' Describes Condition
Conditions in this region are vividly
portrayed in a letter from a woman
worker on the French frontier. She
says:
"It is beyond Noyon, to the north,
the west, and the east, that one sees
the most appalling destruction. Vil-
lage after village is passed, nothing
left but a few remnants of walls, not
a stick of furniture in their empty
shells-silent, deserted ruins. Of
course we know that the Germans de-
stroyed all the sewage arrangements
which cannot betreplaced quickly, and
we also know that the unsuspicious
pile of sand may contain dangerous
explosives, purposely hidden there.
"As we proceed,.we meet fewer and
fewer civilians, and more and more
soldiers. Here and there we pass
old men, old women and children, still
clinging faithfully to the gaping walls
of their former homes, and while we
stop to speak to them, soldiers on the
march pass us, their feces aglow when
they see the American flag on our
car.

V

We make a specialty of ligtlt 1w
them at
The Fountain o
Corner -of State.and I

Supply Needs in Devastated French
Villages; Sleep on Chicken
Wire Mattresses

I
I

ir
Fountain
for your Caddies-

Flowe
For All, Purp

;I

- I
I''

334 S. State St.
Flashlights, Campus Views
Out-door Groups

Cousins& Hallu
Members of the Florists' Telegraph Delivery A
b

We
tention

give careful personal ,at-
to your Kodak finishing.

-JUST ARRIV
The Latest in a Sheep S
The "NEW WHIPCORD" with
Wombat Collar

:ogyraph

PHONE 2446-J
Try our Chop Suey
Chinese and American Dishes

,

WAI KING LOO
Joe Gin, Prop.

314 S. state St.

Phone 1244-M

trjc1-
alid

_. _ . _ .

f
$

adio Military SC p S Fountain Pe
NrIstWatches Waterman
4.25 to $21 and ConKli
U, of M. Jewelry
Schlanderer & Seyfried

ins
In

34 or 825-M

VAY

verheard
German

In

they said, 'our having any further trou-
ble over it.' One of the men remark-
ed, 'It is time these Norwegians found
out what it means to defy us. Let
them see what happens when their
own crops and stocks burn, and those
on the other side refuse new supplies.'
"Then they talked about the German
spy case in Bergen, and said that this
little exposure did not amount to
much, for a net was spun over the
whole Norwegian coast, and even if
it br ke at a single point, the net held.
all the same, thanks to the Norwe-
gian's trustfulness. They added that
the U-boats' work must be supported
at any price, as it would bring a quick
finish to the war. There was further
talk of certain journeys and of var-
ious persons who had done great ser-
vice to Germany.
"The conversation was overheard
and reported to the police."
In connection with this police state-
ment, the newspapers give a list of
the 15 mysterious fires referred to, and
the financial loss in each case. The
loss varies from about 80,000 kroner
to 150,000. In the case of adire at Sor-
engen, it is noted that "irreplaceable

,---The Christi-
t has officially
n that recent
known to have
;n agents, and
on their guard,

Philadelphia, Nov. 21.-Christopher
Brown walked into a local recruiting
station of the United States Marine'
Corps today, and after announcing the
fact that he was from Braintree, said
he wanted to enlist,
"The idea of enlisting is a good
one," said the recruiting sergeant, "but
what is Braintree-a breakfast food
or an educational institution?"
"It is a town in Massachusetts-the
only town in the United States that
ever produced two presidents," proud-
ly replied Brown. "John Adams was
born there and so was John Quincy
Adams. John Hancocl was born there
too, as was Colonel Charles G. Long,
chief of staff of the Marine Corps.
If you take me into the Marine Corps
I may be running the thing in a year
or two."
But Christopher Brown had fiat feet
and so can't be a U. S. Marine, al-
though he finds comfort in the thought
that he may some day be president.
PHOTOS OF MEN IN SERVICE TO
APPEAR IN MICHIGANENSIAN
Snapshots of all Michigan men who
have joined the army or navy, since
war was declared will be featured in
the 1918 Michiganensian. As many
photographs as possible will be pro-
cured from the several cantonments,
but since it will be impossible to pro-
cure all of them in this way, the Mich-
iganensian staff asks any one who has
a snapshot or photograph of a former
student or group of students, now in
service, to send it to the Michiganen-
sian office in the Ann Arbor Press
building. Those doing this are asked
to leave their name and address.
Canadians Add Verse To "America"
An additional verse of America,
written by a Canadian, Just has been
sung in Canada for over a year. With
our men in service we can use it when
we sing America.
God save our splendid men-
Lead them safe home again-
God save our men.
Keep them victorious,
Patient and chivalrous-
They are so dear to us-
God save our men.

Quarters are Primative
"Our quarters are primative. For
30 months Germans lived in these
walls. For a little over a month
French soldiers were housed heire
Now 10 American women have._ ade
in their temporary home. You cannot
imagine the condition in which we
found it. For three days, while wait-
ing for our beds to come from Paris
via the slow railway and the slower
camion service from Noyon, we did,
some very necessary housecleaning.
We put on our blue blouses, which
completely cover us, and set to work
with bits of glass to scrape the walls
and cupboards,
"In three villages where there are
nothing but ruins, we are co-operat-
ing with the government to put up
small, three-roomed houses. We furn-
ish them and provide the occupants
with means of livelihood. Now we
have three small villages growing
like mushrooms. We are trying to
get the French government to send
us some tractors to till the ground
and prepare it for seeding. There are
no men, so we must organize .Belgian
labor im possible and use it in the
fields."
U. S. WILL OPEN CAMOUFLAGE
SCHOOL FOR WOMEN WORKERS

U

a'. .~ A 4
f
c- yry4 /
U~~' f~-' ~ .~ q~~
X~~~ Te ®-D4*1'

il

MAIN STREET

Inrde

a

on with the recent mys-
t is important that the
ild be made known:
go a conversation took
ilway station here be-
erman-speaking people,
as stated among other

by letters of alphabet, had stores valued at many million kroner
a magnificient piece of!I were endangered."
that they had visited sev-
, whose names were also Skinner To Speak At Michigan Center
only by letter. All the Mr. S. J. Skinner, instructor in or-
. have occurred recently atory, will speak on "The Democracy
ssed with great interest, of Modern American Verse" tomor-
man-speaking people reck- row night at Michigan Center.
ow much merchandise in;
been destroyed, 'without,' Patronize Our Advertisers.-Adv.

A school of camouflage for women
is to open in Washington, D. C., on
Dec. 1, under the direction of Mrs.
Clara Strong, of Marsh Field,
Hills, Mass. Camouflage is the art
of disguising objects by deceptive col-
oring in order that their true nature
may be hidden. It has proved very
useful in the present war in conceal-
ing, especially from enemy bird-men,
the outlines of warships, guns, tanks,
and other implements of modern war-
fare.
The institution, which is to equip
women to do this sort of work, has
already . received the unofficial ap-
proval of the United States War De-
partment. The course will last a
month and if the enrollment war-
rants, an officer appointed by the
government, will be detailed to train
the students in the art of camouflage.
The government guarantees to give
all women who graduate from the
school positions in the shipyards,
where they will be given the oppor-
tunity to help in equipping the war-
ships.
The tuition will be $50 for the full
course.
Use the Daily classified columns.

T 0 begin a telephone
necessary that both
introduce themselves.

When answering a telephone call say
Jones talking." The caller says "1
Brown talking"-a complete introdict
tity of both parties is fully established.
.Hello, who is this? andl other sin
simply a waste of time, made unnece
form of telephone introduction.

convex
parties

n"
.,,
B<. ys4a
°FhE b

Michigan State Telephone
J. J. Kelly, Manager
Telephone 500

ENGLISH SOCIALISTS DRAFT should rema
NEW PARTY CONSTITUTION I authority of

NG

Leave Copy
at
Students'
Supply Store

v

ANTED
uy second hand cloth-
y fair price. Phone
0 E. Hoover Ave.
ders at 803 S. State
Girls dining room

FOR SALE
FOR SALE- Twelve military guns,
two drums and a gas lamp, for sale
at 331 9. Liberty St. Phone 669.
MISCELLANEOUS
LOOK AT THIS-If you have any old
shoes, either send them down or let
me know where they are. 402 De-

London, Nov. 20.-The national ex- P
ecutive of the labor party has com- e
pleted a draft of the new constitution
of the party which will be presented m
at the conference at Nottingham in b
January.
It is proposed that the-name of-the g
party remain unchanged but that its s:
scope be widened to include political ti
interests of all producers "by brain a
or by hand" without distinction of o
class or occupation, and that it should m
be reorganized on the double basis d
of national societies and - parliament- a
ary constituencies. 14
The societies eligible for affiliation,
will be as heretofore, trade unions, so-
cialist organizations, and co-operative
societies, but it is planned to add in C

r
I

EASY
TERMS

CHRISTMAS VICTROLAS

At GRINNELL BROS.. and you can buy them on
Easy Terms
SPEAK EARLY FOR YOURS

house or
g. Phone

Ludwv

s

nity to

ce to

GRINNELL BROTHERS

116

MA

_°--_

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