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November 22, 1917 - Image 4

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1917-11-22

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

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'm
se.

LBUI~A UUWN-IHUUUtN
BY BURWN INVDR

on for
e only
exist-

d on the
monthly
body.

The military department of Purdue
university will maintain graphic rep-
resentation of European battlefields.
It is planned to have one large contour
map of cbay on the floor, showing the
French and Belgian front, which will
be corrected and rearranged each
week, keeping the map absolutely up
to date. In addition to this, Captain
Mitchell will endeavor to secure var-
ious movie films in order to show the
army manouvers as carried on in the
European war.

ges. Fire started a panic among the
dancers at the Women's Athletic Asso-
service ciation dance at the University of Il-
nbrance linois recently. Nearly a hundred
as gift. dancers were on the floor at the time
enlisted of the fire and the breaking of the
te bars, blaze into the women's dressing room
of the threw the crowd into confusion. The'
playing of the orchestra helped to
keep down excitement until 'police
are op- cleared the floor.
of the
Saving of coal and other fuel will
be taught by the University of Wis-
rised by consin Extension division.
engin- A special bureau to answer ques-
sity, to tions pertaining to fuel and firing has
rge map been'established in the department of
id'num- mechanical engineering, and articles
of each on the economic use of fuel are be--
at the ing prepared for Wisconsin newspa-.
0 names pers
pers. _
time a Interesting M'i5
college
take all --
ell stu- Attendants of the bride at a recent
rs cred- Brooklyn wedding were attired as Red
Cross nurses.
:sen by Badger, a much abused dog whose
name of troubles were reported in the Chicago
the fac- Daily Tribune, has been shipped to
s of the Camp Custer to become the mascot of
it upon the third battalion, 160th depot brig-
ade.
d at the New heavy duty army trucks be-
e school ing amnufactured for the United
all Jun- States, are capable of averaging 105-
rs were miles a day on heavy roads.

MEN ARE DRAFTED 1OR ARMY
AND ALL CITIZENS
EXPATRIATED
Corfu, Island of Corfu, Nov. 21.-
"The funds advanced to Serbia by the
United States government are saving
the lives of the Serbian people," said
the Serbian minister of public works,
Dr. Momtchilo Nintchitch, who has
been charged~ with the expenditure of
the advances from the American gov-
ernment.
Dr. Nintchitch had been telling of
the various uses the American money
was put to, for the 136,000 Serbian
prisoners in Germany aad for interned
civilians, refugees, and pensions. But
now he turned to a story of the cruelty
and butchery which the Bulgars ' are
still prosecuting against the Serbs.
Serbia Deepest Sufferer
"Serbia has suffered more than any
other country," said Dr. Nintchitch,
"for not even the ruin of Belgium
and the devasted regions of France
can compare with what Serbia has
suffered. The people of Belgium and
France had seaports to go to and
escape in ships, and they had rail-
ways. But the Serbian people had
no ports for escape, and when the
INonastir railway line was cut by the
Bulgars they had no railway. So they
were literally caught in a trap, with
no means of egress, and except for
those who made the exodus across the
mountains, the whole peasant popu-
lation has come under the control e
the Bulgar invaders. Moreover, Bel-
gium and France have been unde
the eyes of England and America,
while Serbia is cut off from the world,
with no knowledge of what goes on
there, and no mail from there for two
years.
"The Serbian peasants have been
stripped of everything. All their
horses, cattle and live stock has been
taken, and their farm machinery has
been destroyed. Men, women and chil-
dren have been killed in the most re-
volting manner, and on the most
flimsy pretext. In this the Bulgars go
far beyond the Austrians, for the Aus-
trians have a trial and a formal con-
demnation to death. But the Bulgars
have no trial or condemnation. The
order to kill is given, andnthe soldiers
are practically free to take life on
their own Judgment without any or-
der."

ing of from all quarters daily.
Serbian Women Revolt
"We have received full details of
the revolt which the Serbian peasants
remaining in the country directed
against this Bulgar oppression," the
minister continued. "This has come
in a letter from a well-known teacher.
The revolt. was really a revolt of-
women-of the Serbian mothers, wives
and sisters-in a frantic -protest
against having their sons, husbands
and brothers forced into the Bulgar
ranks to fire on Serbian soldiers. This
women's movement became so threat-
ening that a German division at Nish
was sent to quell it. When this failed,
two Bulgar divisions were sent against
the increasing ranks of the revolt.'
"This gave .the Bulgars the oppor-
tunity to perpetrate a new infamy.
Sending their troops against the wom-
en, they took as prisoners a large
number of the wives, mothers and
sisters who had protested against
their men being taken as Bulgar sol-
diers. Then these wives and mothers
were formed in ranks; placed ahead
of the Bulgar divisions, and in thips
battle order with the Serbian women
in front as a screen for the Bulgar
troops-these divisions pushed against
the main body of the revolting peas-
ants. It was only by such methods
of using the women as screens, and by
resort to the most extreme cruelty
that the revolt was finally put down.
In one case, the writer of the letter
gives details of seeing a Serbian peas-
ant hung- up by the tongue.
Winter Will Be Hard
The minister spoke of the increas-
ing needs of .these Serbian peasants
during the coming cold months. Those
Serbs who have escaped, and who are
here at Corfu and at various Balkan
ing to give. -
"It is for this reason," said the min-
ister, "that the funds advanced by the
United States government are truly
providential, and are saving Serbian
lives, thousands of them."
The advance made by the United
States was 15,000,000 francs, or $3,-
000,000. This was designed to cover
a period of three months; and at this
rate the advance for a year would be
$12,000,000, or 60,000,000 francs. The
distribution of these funds is under
the direction of Dr. Nintchitch, with
the American charge d'affairs, H. Per-
cival Dodge, in frequent consultation
with him, and exercising American su-
pervision.

I,
*
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* te
*Fr
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*T
*
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*
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T1
Thi
ney
usuz
an
New
her
The
Will
sell
ten
"Wi

A" THE TH

AT

"Canary Cottage," at the Gar-
ck.
Annie Russell in "The Thir-
enth Chair," at the Whitney,
riday, Nov. 23.

*
*
*
*
*
*
* '
*

& Co., 117 S. Ashley St.-Adv
Patronize Our AdvertiserE

TODAY -

Whitney - "The Girl
axi-.
Majestic-Vaudeville.

*
in the *
*

.

Trpheum- Walt. Whiteman in
Then Tar Wheel Warrior." Also
riangle Comedy and Weekly.
Wuerth-Julian Eltinge in "The
ountess Charming." Also Key-
one Comedy, "The Late Lament-

*
*
*
*
*
:
*
*-

Arcade-Geraldine
Joan the Woman."

6 'NIghts
3
Matinees

Farrar in *
*

Rae - Emmy Weh'lan in
obinson Cruscoe." Also
ernon Castle in "Patria."

*
"Miss *
Mrs. *
*

THfS WEEK
Oliver Morosco's Gay and Gladsome Musl
CANARY COTTJ
With Herbert Corthell, Chas. Rug
and a typical Morosco Cast
Rae Theatre
ITODAY --Enemy Welblatt
"T ISS ROBINSON CRUS
Mrs. Vernon Castle. Ad
slon-10 cents.
A LI CA D_
W ed Thu-21-22-Geraldine Farrar
Joan the Woman (i P ,
F1ri-23-Clara Kimball oung in
and Christie Comedy.
Sat-24-Earle Williams and Co
Griffith in "The L~ov. Doctor,"
Comedy. "Plagues and Puppy I,
Man-26-Mme. Olga Petrova in"
Sellers," and Drew Comedy,
Spies."
TCue-27-Norma Talmadge in "Pol
(Ret.) and Comedy, "Risks
Roughnecks."
We make and retail hats.
Hats-to-Order and do all kinds
work such as reblocking, newb
etc. We also sell anl rehlock
flats.
Hats shaped to fit the head f
charge when bought of us.
FACTORY HAT STORE
617 Packard St.,next to the D
"The Right Place to Buy a H
Telephone 792

6, * * * * * :* * * * ; * *

AT THE WHITNEY

he melodrama of mystery, "The
rteenth Chair," comes to the Whit-
theater tomorrow night. This un-
al and interesting play has created
immense amount of comment in
w York and Chicago, and it comes
e with the complete Chicago cast..
play is under the direction of
liam Harris Jr., with Annie Rus-
in the leading role, and was writ-
by Bayard Vieller, author of
thin the Law."

AT THE MAJESTIC

The attractive program the Majestic
is offering for the latter half of this
week is headed by six Hawaiians in a
native musical act, with a tropical at-:
mosphere. The Buch brothers appear
in the clever acrobatic burlesque,
"Ship Ahoy"; Arthur Rigby, a mono-
logist gives newsy talks and
stories, and J. Frank Halliday)
and Miss Willetts, have an in- _
teresting act. As a concluding =
act Sigsbee's animals appear in clever
and unusual acrobatic stunts.,;

irs
An American ambulance section of
25 machines has left Paris for Italy.;
ty
lis The state of New York is in need
ns of 1,104 lawyers to serve on exemption
boards without pay for the period of
the war.
German art critics are enthusiastic
in their appreciation of the work of
Auguste Rodin, and the Berlin Acad-
emy of Fine Arts is considering the ad-
visability of sending a note of condol-
ence to his, family through some'neu-
tral country.
Her Rebellion
I've beamed when you hollered, "Oh,
Girlie!1"
I've hopped when you bellowed, "Oh,
say!"
I've fallen for "Dearie" and "Misus,"
And everything else till today.
But there's one thing that's got to be
different,
From now till the great war is
done-
Unless you're prepared for a riot,
You've got to quit calling me t.Hun!
i -Boston Transcript.

Ride
a .

Taxi

1lOcI

Dance at Armory every Saturday
night. 9 to 12.-Adv.

!VFRI. NOV. 23
1OM ITS TRIUMPHANT,
IS RUN IN CHICAGO
s Supreme Sensation

Photographs for Evidence
As documentary evidence of thist
killing, the Serbian ministry of for-
eign affairs have had photographs,t
copies of which were given to the cor-
respondent, showing six Serb peas-
ants strung up side by side from
rough stakes driven in the ground.
with a cross-piece above for the noose,1
while groups of soldiers and office.
are gathered about, laughing over the
contortions of the victims.1
"The Bulgar policy is to consider
Serbia and the Serbian people as an-
niliated," Dr. Nintchitch went on. "Tot
this end they hold that the Serbs no
longer exist, and every Serb must be-
come a Bulgar, take a Bulgar name,
and become a Bulgar citizen.,
"Our minister of war, General Ter-'
zitch, has Just gone through a trying
family experience of this kind. His
aged mother, over 70 years old,
remained in Serbia after the exodus,
as she was too old and feeble to make
the journey. All trac? of her had
been lost;,but when she was finally
located, General Terzitch applied
through the relief authorities for her
transfer. But to this application the
reply has now come back from the
Bulgar authorities that Mme. Terzitch
cannot leave the country as she has
become a Bulgar citizen.
Bulgars Draft Serbs
"The drafting of Serb peasants as
soldiers in the Bulgar ranks is one
of the worst forms of cruelty being
practiced. This is systematically car-
ried out, with notices posted in all
public places telling all men over 17
years of age to report for military
duty. This placing of a whole popu-
lation in the military service of the
enemy is an unheard of cruelty, and
contrary to every rule of international
dealing in time of war. But it is
justified by the Bulgar on the theory
that Serbia does not exist and that
the Serbs are Bulgars.
"A member of the Serbian chamber
of deputies was here yesterday, and
gave me a harrowing report of his
family still in Serbia. One of the boys
had already been killed. The second
boy had been ordered to become a
Bulgar soldier. The mother protested,
whereupon she was sent to Nish and
put in prison, where she went crazy.
Meantime the boy ordered to become
a Bulgar soldier had escaped to'the
mountains and a price has been placed
on his head. This, experience in the

Quota in Three Parts
In making the expenditures, the
first $3,000,000 has been divided in
three parts of $1,000;000 each. The
first million is being employed for the
Serbian soldiers held as prisoners in
Germany, Austria and Bulgaria, and
for the civilian Serbs interned in these
countries. Together, these Serb pris-
oners and interned aggregated about
200,000. These people get a bare ex-
istence in the prison camps where
they are held, and anything beyond
this bare existence comes from the
American funds.
The second $1,000,000 is used for
pensions and relief to the wounded
Serbian soldiers no longer able to
earn a living, and for the relief of the
Serbian peasantry remaining in Ser-
bia.

,

The third
mainly for
Serbia, in.
etc which
that Serbia,
pie, may be
least, to its

d $1,000,000 will be used'
reconstruction work in
replacing bridges, roads,
have been destroyed, so
once restored to its peo-
brought back, in part at
former condition.

C
r
t
f

&" -__

i
I

FARM FOR EVERY SOLDIER,
SUGGESTS SENATOR HARDING

Washington, D. C., Nov. 21.-That
every United States soldier, when he
returns from the war, be given the
opportunity to become the owner of a
farm, is suggested by Senator Warrer
Harding of Ohio.
"There are vast quanties of unculti-
vated farm lands near the best dis-
tricts of the country, in the middle
and Pacific coast states, and these will
offer real. opportunities to the un-
attached soldiers who return home aft-
er the war. These men should have
the opportunity to make good and the
government should prepare the way
for them."

Arb
'Q
..
--

MAT. 8 P. M. 10-20e

NITES 7:30-9 20-25-30c

|HAWAIIAN WEEK

. , . . ... ... _ gym.

or's storts.-Adv.

"Joan the Woman," the special pho-
toplay in which Geraldine Farrar ap-
pears, is offered at the Arcade tsday.
There is a certain timeliness about
the story of Joan of Arc, as it has
been reported frequently that French
public interest in the Maid of Orleans
was never so keen as at the present
time. Joan's great love story is woven
through it all.j
Read the Daily advertisements.
t'hey will lead 'you to the best of Ann

AT THE ARCADE

"ilYill iil "as "iliFl{"#F"E:Fi

3 DAYS STARTS THUR. NITE
ON THE BEACH
AT W______
A HAWAIIAN SERENADE
- with -
SIanGINGMSIC AND )HUTLA IDANCING

.MAJESTIC

WuerthTheatre
Prices: 1 Cents
Matinees 2, 3:30. Nights 6:30, 8, g
Saturdays-Sundays-Continuous
N'OVEMBER
'Thur-Fri-22-23-Julian Fltinge in
Countess Charming." Also Keyst
Comedy, "The Late Lamented."
Sat-24-Wm. Courtney in "Hunting
the Hawk." Also Serial, "Neglec
Wife," No. 1.2.
Sun-Mon-25-26-Billie Burke in "A
and the Girl." Also Miss My
Stedman in person will sing.
Victor Moore Comedy. Sunday.o
25 cents.
Tues-Wed-27-28-Geo. B. Howard
"Come Through" in 7 Parts.
Thur-Fri-29-3o-Jack Pickford and Lo
Huff in "The Ghost-House."F
Keystone , Comedy, "The Sult
Wife."
OrpheumTheat
Prices: zoc unless otherwise specif
Matinees 2, 3:30. Nights 6:30, 8,
Saturdays-Sundays-Continuous
NOVEMBER
Thu -22-Walt Whiteman in "The
Heel Warrior." Also 'triangle C
edy and Weekly.
Fri-23-Olive Thomas in "Broad
Arizona." Also Triangle Con
and Weekly.
Sat-24-Juliette Day in "The Caler
Girl." Also Travels and Comed
Sui-25-Taylor Holmes in "Fool
Luck." Also "Do Children Cour
Evening x~c.
Mon-26-Anita King in "The Girl
gle." Also Weekly and Comedy.
Tues-27-Alice Brady in "The Mai
Belgium." Also Comedy. Eve.

HARRIS JR. PRESENTS
ARD VIELLER'S
rama of Myst ry
T"HE

6--HA WAIIANS-6

"Held
the
Audience
in

a
Thrall
of
Chills
Creeps
and
Thrills" -
lA IR Chicago
Examiner

UNITARIAN STUDENTS'. SOCIETY
SECURE SCHMITZ FOR LECTURE

f

FUN-FUN-FUN
SHIP AHOY BOYS or SPILLING THE BEANS
HOLIDAY ARTHUR SIGSBEE'S
. and RIGBY ACROBATIC
WILLETTE The
Comedy Minstrel Canine
"Detailed" Man Intelligence
SUNDAY ONLY NOV. 25
BIG DOUBLE FEATURE PROGRAM

Dr. H. J. Schmitz, of this city, will
give an illustrated lecture on "The
Alps" next Sunday evening at the Uni-
tarian church, corner of State and
Huron streets. Mildred E. Sutton, of
the School of Music, will give a violin
solo. The lecture is under the aus-
pices of the Unitarian Student so-
ciety.
The society will hold a dancing
party Saturday evening 'in the -Guild
rooms, and a play, "The Rice Pud-
ding," will be presented Nov. 30.
ou ~i nn 'na yo --

11

"MOTHER
Beautiful Bluel

AND ENTIRE
CHICAGO CAST

W.

I

lay

You S

will find what yo:

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