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November 20, 1917 - Image 6

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1917-11-20

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

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IN HANDS _

L I L
PlE!

IVLII
DENT
ED TO

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VVHAl'3 (itIU_.UlI

1

TODAY

ANNOTNCEMENT EXPECTE

9l
CLEAN UP ISUNDER.
STANDIN G

7:30 o'clock-Spanish
Lane hall.
7.:30 o'clock-Alphia
ciety meets in Adelphia
sity hall.

club meets in
debating so-
room, Univer-

F
ONF Or 'iEBEST

Style -

r Boot Shop
115 S% Main Street

ity of Michigan

our splendidly complete line
handsome
nd Overcoats
Clever Models
and full belted, in handsome
.s, single and double-breasted.

to $40

PEOPLE PREFER

Washington, Nov. 19. - President
Wilson today was given free hand by
the railroads in his effort to avert a
strike by engineers, conductors and
brakemen. He will confer with the
union heads Thursday.
Formal announcement to the board
that the railroads were ready in case
of a crisis to place their interests
in the hands of the president for such
distribution as he may determine nec-
essary in the public interest, was ex-
pected to clear away any misunder-
standing of the four brotherhoods
about the attitude of the roads.
Possibility of a stoppage in the
flow of commerce, thereby paralizing
the nation's war preparations, was be-
lieved by officials to have passed.
SIX EXPERT CHEMISTS WILL
INVESTIATE GAS FOR WAR USE
Washington, Nov. 19.-Six of the
country's foremost chemists have been
called as a special board to investigate
explosives and the use of gases in war-
fare, named by Secretary Lane to ad-
vise the bureau of mines.
The board will go into the sub-
ject of increasing the production of
materials used in explosives manu-
facture and will advise the bureau in
the operation of the recently enacted
law regulating the sale of explosives.
Members are: Dr. William H. Nichols
of the General Chemical company, New
York, chairman; Prof. H. P. Talbot,
head of the chemical department of
the Massachusetts Institute of Techno-
logy; Williams Hoskins, Chicago, con-
sulting chemist; Prof. H. P. Venable,
University of North Carolina; E. C.
Franklin, Leland Stanford Junior uni-
versity, and Dr. Charles L. Parsons of
the bureaus of mines.
YANKEE INGENUITY SAVES
U. S. FREIGHTER FROM U-BOAT
An Atlantic Port, Nov. 19.-Fires
kindled on the hatch of an American
freighter saved it from submarine at-
tack recently, say the officers of the
steamer which arrived yesterday.
Shortly after leaving a European port
they saw a U-boat approaching. The
captain ordered small blazes made on
the hatches, using material almost
noncombustable, but producing heavy
smoke.
When the submarine came close, the
steamer was stopped, the captain told
the U-boat commander he carried ex-
plosive, and that on account of the
fire he was about to abandon the ship.
The submarine immediately departed,
its commander evidently believing an
explosion was imminent.
Late Rail agnate's Daughter To Wed
St. Paul, Minn., Nov. 19.-(Special)
-The engagement of Miss Clara Ann
Hill, daughter of the late James J. Hill,
to Erasmus Christopher Lindley, vice-
president of the Great Northern rail-
road, was announced -today.
Adelphi to Discuss English Cabinet
The Adelphi House of Representa-
tives meets at 7:30 o'clock tonight in
University hall in the Adelphi rooms.
A resolution calling for the adoption
of the English cabinet form of gov-
ernment in the United States will be
discussed.
Always-Daily Service-Always.

U- NOTICE
There will be a meetig of the Ora
torical board at 7 o'clock tonight in
room 302 Mason hall. All oratorical
delegates are expected to be present.-
There will be a rehearsal of the
Varsity band at 7 o'clock tonight in
University hall.
There will be a meeting of all the
first sergeants and company command--
ers of the University regiments at 7:30
o'clock tonight in Waterman gymnas-
ium.
16,000 NATIONAL ARMY MEN
ARRIVE AT CAMP CUSTER
Camp Custer, Battle Creek, ,Mich.,7
Nov. 19.-Sixteen thousand newly se-
lected men arrived here today to train
for military service. They brought
the number of soldiers here to thirty-
one thonsand-eighty per cent of its
full strength.
All Wisconsin and .Michigan were
represented in the trains which rolled
into the food city today. Every coun-
ty, city, town, village and hamlet had
its personal representative.
Each county in Wisconsin sent 331
per cent of its quota under the selec-
tive service law. Every Michigan
county, except Wayno, and every Mich-
igan city except Detroit and Highlandi
Park, started thirty per cent of their
quotas on the way. Wayne county,
Detroit, and Highland Park sent 40
per cent. The increase in percentage
was made to bring certain regiments
to full strength.
These new arrivals are the third
increment under the new law which
strikes all impartially. It is not yet
known when the remaining "drafted
men will be called to the colors.
GERMAN AUTHORITIES TRY
RATIONS FOOD BLUFF
Copenhagen, Nov. 19.-The view that
the German authorities are pursuing
a policy of bluff in granting food al-
lowances considerably higher than
are justified by crops, seemingly is
confirmed by recent debates in the
Prussian diet. It was said in these
debates that it probably would be ne-
cessary to reduce both the meat and
bread rations March 1
The laboring classes generally are
complaining that the potato allowance
of a pound a day is inadequate, but it
is said that there is no prospect of the
allowance being increased, as the sur-
plus will -be required' for feeding 'ani-
mals.
German Sues New York Producers
New York, Nov 19.-Suit for breach
of contract has been started against
the Metropolitan Opera company by
Mme, Marguerite Ober, the German
singer. She was discharged because
the directors decided not to give Ger-
man operas during the war.
28 New Reserve Banks Since Nov. 1
Washington, D. C., Nov. 19.-Twen-
ty-eight important state banks and
trust companies have been admitted to
the federal reserve system since Nov. 1
in the government's plan for strength-
ening the nationdl financial structure
against the shock of war.
Always-Daily Service-Always.-

An automobile

EARL s . - . p v r
IYNPRO
CITY. NEWS

SHOES
for

a truck owned by the Weinberg and
Kurtz company collided with a car
driven by F. 0. Leever, 606 South
Thayer street occurred at Williams
and Fifth streets, Sunday. Both ma-
chines were overturned and Leever
and his wife, were badly bruised.
L. W. Tessmer and Dan Luckhardt,
who were riding on the truck were
bruised and cut by flying glass.
An important conference of the Ann
Arbor- Red Cross chapter will be held
today at Lane hall from 10 to 6 o'clock.
Contributions from Ann Arbor in
the country-wide campaign for Y. M.
C. A. funds to be used in army camps
in this country and Europe totaled
$12,382.50 yesterday noon. This sur-
passes by $2,500 the city's original
quota of $10,000.
With the 50 per cent increase asked
for in each quota throughout the coun-
try, Ann Arbor's present quota of $15,-
000 is expected to be obtained by noon
today.
Zal-Gaz Grotto will make an excur-
sion trip Sunday to Camp Custer,
where they will visit members of their
lodge who are in the national army. -
Dean H. B. Hinsdale of the Homeo-
pathic medical school will address the
Woman's club this afternoon on the
relation of home hygiene to public
health. '
You will find what, you wantI
through the Daily want ads.-Adv.
Use the Daily classified columns.

is an expression c
originality inter
preted by a sens
of good taste.
We are creators c
style, not imitators

IN DETR,
101 Washingt

GERMAN EDITOR INTE
FOR DISPLE2
Portland, Ore., Nov. 19.-
former editor of the Germ
Deutsche.Zeitung, which
pendel, has written his
for some time to come.
rested recently on a pres
rant and wl be interned
tion of the war.
The arrest was made
United States Marshal Ti

collision in which

AlfredJ. Rubi
I INCORPORATED

NICKELS
ARCADE

, R "
< 5
<
_

EAM
Pasteurized Cream
a

Reames, and came without intima
although it was known that Lucke
been under surveillance.
As editor of the Deutsche Zei
Lucke published editorials and
articles that were displeasing to
federal authorities. He was wa
by United States Attorney Ream
publish less that might be interp
as seditious in his columns. Shy
afterward his paper announced
pension as the result of federal
sure.
Lucke, although for fifteen yea
resident of this country, has neve
nounced his German allegiance.

reade Cafeteria

NOW SERVING
THE PUBLIC

LYNDON, Photographer
719 N. University Ave.

cADE

Ann Arbor's Largest Dealer in

Cleanliness Is Paramount'
SOLDIERS NEED TECHNICAL
BOOKS, MOST SAYS LIBRARIAN;

Eastman Kodaks and Films Amateur Finishing
is our Praticular Business and we make it our
Particular Business to get the Kind of Results
that make you our Permanent Customer

11i.

Old Magazines of No Value; Students
Asked To Donate Physics,
Texts

I

Text-Books and Suppli
For all Courses

"If the people of Ann Arbor could
see how Lie soldiers out there pore
over the books that have been sent,
they would be more liberal in their
donations," said Mr. W. W. Bishop,
University librarian, returned from a
visit to Camp Custer.
Old magazines are of no value to
the boys at camp, according to Mr.
Bishop. The old magazines are be-
ing sold and the money will be expend-
ed in buying subscriptions.
Books on engineering are in demand,
especially in the field of electricity and
.LEE physics. Students desiring to contri-
bute books are requested to bring
rial box them to the office of the Librarian at
Li Pencils, once.

WE SU

UPPLY EVERY STUDENTS' NEED

Sheehan & Co.
Ann Arbor DE

Michigan Central

Special

Train

to Chicago

ail Co.
Y.

1.1

Made
C.

I
ew Members
swere made
theirrregular
rard Dennee,
Hazel Sel-
19; Hestor
'18; Kathryn
); A. J. Him-
Seltzer, '20,

25 Women Report for Basketball
Senior and sophomore women basj-
etball enthusiasties held the first
practice of the season at 4:30 o'clock
yesterday afternoon in Barbour gym-
nasium.
Twenty-five women were present, the
largest number that has reported for
initial practice in several years. Prac-
tically all of last year's junior and
freshmen teams were out, in addition
to a number of new players, which
according to Miss Alice Evans, gym-
nasium instructor, show great promise.
Beulah Smith, '18, has been appoint-
ed as women's basketball manager for
the year.
Freslinen To Meet In First Assembly
The first freshmen literary assem-
bly will be held at 10:30 o'clocksWed-
nesday morning in University hall.
Prof. John R. Brumm will speak to
the first year men.

If you have not already registered for
transportation on the special train to
Chicago for the Michigan-Northwest-
ern football game, to leave Ann Arbor
at 10 P. M., Friday, Nov. 23rd, please do
so at once in order that ample equip-
ment may be provided to accommo-
date the large number who will go.

Harry A. Tillotson, Ticket

[ty to
Daily

{ m~r

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