100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Download this Issue

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

November 20, 1917 - Image 5

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1917-11-20

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

a garment you put on to keep

store.

"animal."

vercoat" brings to your mind a picture of
-fitting, comfortable outer garment that a
en he leaves his home-

EIN-BLOCH and
CH AELS-STERN
to Thirty-five Dollars.

hmitt, Apfel Co.

[nery

334 S. State St.
Flashlights, Campus Views
Out-door Groups

rTLES
MAYNARD
Ah.. and Sodas
Appointment
ee Photograph
%IN
University Ave
0./,s. I
u 'S

We
tention

give careful personal at-
to your Kodak finishing.

PHONE 2446-J

DHMOIVIIVI IUU bR LLUMJ
SAYS CANADIAN OFFICER
CAN ADIAN LIEUTENANT DESCRIB-
ES (RONT LINE TRENCH LIFE
IN TETTER TO STUDENT
Accurate descriptions of living- con-
ditions in the front line of trenches
are given in a letter to a University
student\ from a Canadianized Sammie
who has been fighting in France ever
since war was declared.
The letter, which was somewhat
delayed by censorship, and incorrect
address, follows:
France, Sept. 10, 1917.
My Dear Cousin:-At present we
are in the front line trenches. I have
been out two months now on my sec-
ond tour and I certainly like it, and
intend to stick to it for the duration
of the war.
Patrols Active On Canadian Front
Patrolling has been rather active
on our front lately, but we get the
best of it. The Germans will not fight
when in close 'quarters. A chap who
was on our right tells a good tale of
a patrol. His battalion had sent a
strong patrol out recently to meet a
Boche patrol. Our patrol let Fritz come
right in, then got behind him-and
here is what the "chap in the front line
trench told me that he heard: "Throw
up your hands you-." The answer
was, "Kameraad! Kameraad!" The
The result was that the bunch were
all taken prisoners.
The Canadian patrol was expect-
ing a chase patrol from Fritz, so
they waited, and succeeded in captur-
ing them also.
Americans Too Careless
I have seen some of your home
unit. They are magnificient physi-
cally, but I cannot say any more. I
imagine they'll be like us after a few
trips in the line. They'll adapt them-
selves wonderfully and after one trip
'over the top"'they will pay more
heed to the principles of warfare and
not be so careless like so many; es-
pecially on the first trip over the
bags.
I am going out tonight with a party
to fix up some damaged trenches and
we will get soaked as it will be -rain-
ing. I will be out until 3 o'clock in
the morning and return unable to re-
move anything except my coat. The
only thing to do is to cover myself
with sandbags and go to sleep.
Sandbags are a wonderful institu-
tion. They are made of hemp and
are used to build dugouts, but they
have a thousapd and one other uses
and I will tell you of a few.
Sandbags Used For Many Things
First, when one is cold, a number
of them used as a cover are the warm-1
est coverings one ever slept under. If
your feet get wet, pull two or more
bags over each foot and lie down for
a few hours. Your feet soon become
warm and dry. As a towel for the
hands, it is unequalled. When your
steel hel-met shines, owing to flares a
sandbag covering solves the difficulty.
Lieut. J. J. Cavanaugh,
24 Canadians B. E. F.,
France.
HOUSE HEADS DECLARE FOR
INFORMAL J-HOP OR NONEt
All-Campus Rules For Women Say
10:00 o'clock Closing Hour
During Week
Either an informal Junior hop or,
none'at all was the resolution passed
by the judiciary council of the Wom-
en's league and the house heads at a

joint meeting yesterday.-
Universal house rules for girls
were considered at the meeting, and
it was decided that every women's
house should have a scholarship com-
mittee, a house sanitarium, and a
method of registering week-end and,
out-of-town engagements. The 10 o'-1
clock closing hour is now a law with
the exception of Friday and Saturday,
nights when the closing hour will be
10:30 o'clock.
A complete set of rules to be drawn
up by a committee will be presented1
before the next joint meeting, which2
is to form the all-campus house rules
for women.

for Lum-
Interior
ires, and'

"Shall fraternities at Brown be per-
mitted to have dining rooms in their
own quarters," is the subject on
which undergraduates of Brown uni-
versity will debate for the 1880 contest
this year.
Ohio State university has 890 stu-
dents less than last year. The agricul-
tural and engineering departments
suffered the greatest loss.
Student directories at Ohio State are
selling for ten cents a copy.
Ohio State university aviators are to
have the best equipped barracks in
the United States. Plaster-board on
the walls and linoleum on the floors
are two of the luxuries. The quarters
are being built with a view to turn-
ing them into freshmen dormitories
after the war.
Five girls of Ohio State university
have organized- an orchestra to play
for dances, the proceeds of which will
go to the Y. W. C. A.
Girls of Arizona university cook-
ing classes will endeavor to serve
breakfast for ten cents a person as ai
experiment in food economy. Each stu-
dent is to serve her own breakfast
one day of the week. Later the al-
lowance will be raised a little week-
ly.
Sixty men reported for basketball
at Cornell's first practice. Nine are
last year's veterans.
The Minnesota Daily was asked re-
cently to secure a woman correspond-
ent to supply campus news to a form-
er student with the troops in Texas.
Many of the women students are doing
their bit by cheering the Sammies in
this way.
Professors and students of the Uni-
versity of Kansas have petitioned the
student council to convert part of the
campus valley into a golf course. This
recreation would serve as a possible
substitute for gymnasium work.
Ohio State university will have an
informal junior prom this year as the
result of a decision reached by the
students and faculty in an attempt
to economize. Fraternities have con-
sented to abolish early semester danc-
es. The proceeds of the prom will be
given to the "Y" war fund.
Harvard students who wish to join
the army or navy may take their mid-
year examinations early in January
instead of in February. This decision
will enable seniors who enlist to grad--
uate.
Co-eds of Oregon university have r-
fused to leave their campus beaux for
members of the marine corps. A
recruiting advertiser asked the girls
to act for the movies by deserting
their student admirers for passing
marines. Everything went as sched-
uled but the women kept walking
with the students rather than leave
them for the navy men. So the film did
not materialize.
Parties and dinners at Kansas uni-
versity have been limited in number
and extent this year. Students have
voluntarily adopted wartime meas-
ures.
Purdue faculty .men will speak at.
fraternity and sorority meetings .dur-
ing. the year. Illustrated talks and
lectures are to be parts o1 the pro-.
grams.
Illinois university has reached ttie

quota set in its Y. M. C. A. campaign
two days before the time set. The
sum expected was $20,000 but $30,000'
will probably be obtained..
The annual Army-Navy game will
not be played this year, according to-
the Daily Illini. No reason has been
given.
Eyesore, a building which for some
time has been a blotch on the land-
scape to the students of Oberlin, re-'
cently burned down while the male
population of the school looked on ap .
preciatively.

AA- I4

Flowers
For All Purposes

'l

ut

Cousins & Hd

I

Universit

Members of the Florists' Telegraph Delivery

_. .._

..-

'V
J0

FALL AND WINTER SUIT
We are well equipped to supply you vyith a
smartest styles of fabrics in novetles ands
goods obtainable in a first class merchant tail
establishment.

from the green
the daintiest of
up in any wayc
find our prices
MacDiarmid

Try the
Fountain of Yout
for your Candies-both boxed and plain
We make a specialty of light lunches. Call a
them at
The Fountain of Yout
Corner of State and E. Liberty

J

OFFICERS' UNIFORMS AND ACC

LANDERI
LOWERS

G. H. Wild Con

iJ SAU ER

1
tie

Liberty Street
484 or 825-M
Chop Suey
American Dishes

and

WAI KING LOO
Joe Gin, Prop.
.State St. Phone 1244-M
litary F-Zt S' i Fcuntain Pens
itches E r Waterman
o $21 and ConKlin.
U. of M. Jewelry
landerer & Seyfried
nteresting Viits
nands upon Paris public libraries
been increasingly great, since the
eak of the war. Books of a his-
,1 and scientific character have
especially sought.
tstruction work on branch rail-
in the Lbnets basin of sout-hern

CLARIDGE~
?lw eNew ThU
*e*at 9435? 3Ar-c9
tion of fats in the making of glycer-
ine for explosives, the warring coun-
tries have great quantities of soap on
hand. Germany is said to have a large
stock to unload on any available mark-
et after the war.
WellesRoy girls have destroyed porn
traito of Bismarck and the kaiser which
hung in the dining hall of the German
class.
A detachment of United States mar-
ines from Camp Upton, N. Y., has gone
to Montreal to help Canada in her
Victory loan drive.
Express Companies 'After Rate Boost
Washington, Nov. 19.-Applications
for a ten per cent increase in rates
were submitted yesterday by express
companies to the interstate commerce
commission. Declaring they were op-
erating at a loss because of high
wages and taxes, the Adams, Ameri-
can, Southern, and Wells-Fargo com-

di
bE
is v
w
of

Leading Merchant Tailors

..
w i i.r

State

scontinued on account of the panies asked in behalf of themselves
eing resumed. The district and other companies an increase in
valuable coal deposits which rates. They submitted that they are
transported at great cost by doing more carrying than ever before
carts. but are forced to pay such high wages,
because of labor shortage, that profits
to the, enormous consump- are small.

The Literary Critic.Says
THE VISION SPLENDID, by John Ox-
enham. George H. Doran Co., N. Y.
"Here-or hereafter-you shall see it
ended,
This mighty work to which your souls
are set;
If from beyond, then with the vision
splendid
You shall look back, and never know
regret."
It is rather wonderful in these days
to stumble on someone who regards
the war as an honor -which we should
thank God it is our privilege to share,
but such is the spirit of John Oxen-
ham's book of war- poems, "The Vision
Splendid." He considers the war nec-
essary to make us see that we are
helpless if we forget to count on
God. "The wheels of life," he says in
his introduction, "were skidding on
the greasy ways of our wealth and
ease. We were leaving God out"
Now our opportunity is here, and it
is for us to prove that our prosperity
has not been our demoralization. He
reminds us that the greatest world,
tragedy of all-the crucification-end-
ed in what seemed to be an absolute
failure, but what has become life's
greatest gain.
It is doubtful whether John Oxen-
ham's name will go down through the
ages with those of the great poets.
There are many who will never hear
of him, or who, if they chance to pick
up a volume of his verses, will find
much to criticise, and little of merit.
But there will always be many who
will take his writings for what they
are-the sincerest utterances of a
man who believes in the victorious
Cross, who sees beyond the -horrible
carnage of the present, knowing that
for anything worth having there is al-
ways a price,-that the fact that the
price we are paying is so enormous is.
but God's promise of a greater re-
turn.
Dr. Crane Brands Rumor Pro-German
Dr. Coroline Bartlett Crane, state
chairman of the Women's committee
of the council of national defense, has
denied that she or any member of the
council has been given salaries for

$vuS p4 =.
(1) ow

MODEL C

The newest Patrick Mod(
Double breasted, shawlcol
pleated back, half belt, two
pockets; sizes 36 to 46.
Made from the famous :
rick-Duluth all wool cloth.
yarns are spun from thei
wool in their own mill and
coats are made in a model d
light sanitary factory. Each
guaranteed.

and
Ita

LA II I
SD V E RT ISI N

,Leave Copy'
at
Students'
Supply Store

drE ue!

WANTED
'ED- Young lady assistant in
versity Library wishes lady
m-mate in pleasant suite at Mrs
ch's, 525 E. Univ. Phone 96-M.

ID-Good man
See Mr. M
Mack & Co.

An

to play Santa
McCarron, third
tunity to serve
ou through this,
hlgan Daily.
unity to serve

FOR RENT
FOR RENT-$35 for splendid rooming
house, Division corner Kingsley.
Steam heat and all improvements.
Always rented for $66. Don't miss.
Herbst, Loans, Rentals, and Insur-
ance, Savings Bank Building.
LOST
LOST-A black leather bill folder on
Ferry field, Saturday afternoon. Con-
tained Union membership card,
small sum of money, etc. Finder
please call George Cadwell. Phone
374.

Your

CHRISTMAS
VICTROLA
Is at Grinnell Bros. and you
can have it on easy terms*

BEAUTY SHOP
Miss Mable Rowe, shampoo andl
dressing, 64c. 326 N Fifth Ave.
-Adv.

Next to 01

hailt-
2402.

their work as a bit of prc
paganda.
No compensation is
the state or any other se
the necessary traveling
combined salaries of the
ies employed at headqua
than $90 per week. Mr
the auditor general at
fies these facts.

GRINNELL BROS.

116 S. Main Street

Back to Top

© 2021 Regents of the University of Michigan