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October 03, 1917 - Image 7

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Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1917-10-03

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917 THE MICHIGAN DAILY PAGn

-- i

PROF. A. .WHITE ENTERS
ARMY ENGINEERING CORPS

EXPERIMENT UPON
MOTAL OF NITROGEN
FROM AIR

RE-

Prof. A. H. White of the chemical en-
gineering faculty left last night for
Washington where he will take up
his duties as a captain of the nitrate
division of the army engineering corps.
Congress recently appropriated $20,-
000,000 for the, erection and main-
tenance of laboratories where the fixa-
tion of nitrogen from air will be ex-
perimented upon. Every pound of ex-
plosive requires a pound of nitrogen
in its manufacture and the present
supply of the American army depends
entirely upon the amount secured
from the fields in Chile and other
parts of South America. If this sup-
ply should be cut off the army would
be helpless within six months.
Professor White will experiment
with resources of our own country in
an endeavor to overcome this possible
calamity. A plant will be constructed
in Washington immediately at the ex-
pense of $4,000,000, and Professor
White will be a member of the experi-
mental staff located there. Prof. A.
E. White, Mr. Clair Upthegrove and
Mr. Lieu of the chemical faculty also
have captaincies in the service.
3o Golden Minutes
For Military Men
8 o'Clock Classes Will Begin at 7:30
Monday and Continue for
Balance of Year
The war's sacrifices are not con-
fined to the battle field will again be
impressed upon Michigan students be-
ginning Monday, Oct. 8, upon which
day it has been decided to set the
classes back a half hour in order to
give way to a more extended, course
in military training.
Classes will then and thereafter be-
gin at 7:30 o'clock instead of at 8
o'clock as is now the rule, and will
close regularly at 3:30 o'clock, there-
by adding a half hour to the afternoon
devoted to military training.
Choral Union Tryouts Begin Thursday
Tryouts for membership in the Uni-
versity Choral Union will be held by
Dr. Stanley at the University School
of Music, from 10 to 12 and 4 to 5
o'clock daily, beginning Thursday of
this week. Former members of the
chorus should also register at these
hours.
Members in the chorus must pay a
fee of $3.00, $1.50 of which will be re-
funded at the end of the year when
the music books are returned. Mem-
bers in good standing are given free
admission to'all concerts on the pre-
festival as well as the May Festival
series.
Engineers Start Membership Drive
A .membership in the engineering
society and a year's subscription toi
the Technic are being offered for $1.25
in the campaign the society is carry-
ing on for members.
Members are signing up rapidly and,
indications are that the membership
will be fully as large as last year.1
Plans are being made for an all-engi-
neer smoker to be given at the Union
within the next month. Usual society
dances will be given throughout thef
year.-
Army Needs Flame and Gas Chemists
Flame and gas chemists are in de-
mand in the United States army en-
gineering corps at present.
Four captaincies and 24 lieutenant-
cies are open to anyone who can qual-c
ify for the commissions. Anyone en-c
rolling will see immediate service in1

France.t
Additions to the faculty list at Ohio
State University number more thant
100 this year. .
Fountain pens, all the best makes,L
at Wahr's.-Adv.t
The official Freshman cap. Wagner
& Co. State St. at Liberty.-Adv. n

Army Men to Have
City Jobs Vack
Police Department to Lose One Man
by Draft; Two Firemen Subject
to Army Call
Employees of the city of Ann Arbor
who enlist or are drafted into the serv-
ice of the United States are to be re-
instated in their former positions upon
their return from helping Uncle Sam
win the war, according to the action
of the city council last night.
Frank Keihl, three years patrolman
on the ,police force, is one of the men
.to be affected. He has been called
and passed1by the board and will leave
for Camp Custer Nov. 1. Harley Wise
and Raymond Gillespie, members of
the fire department, are also subject
to call.
One of the other actions of the coun-
cil was to approve a plan of the high
school to build a driveway from Hill
street into their athletic field.
A communication was read from
Mayor Wurster announcing a reorgan-
ization of the police department, to
take effect Nov. 1 of this year. Two
new patrolmen were appointed and
Thomas O'Brien was named sergeant
and acting chief. Several shifts were
also made on the force.
TRAIN FOR FIELD NURSES
WAR WORKERS URGE WOMEN
The committee on women's war
work of New York City has issued a
bulletin urging college women to un-
dertake the study of professionalinurs-
ing in order that Red Cross and other
trained nurses may be released for
war service in the foreign hospitals.
This country can supply more than
9,000 professional nurses, but the
places of these women must be filled
by other women in the hospitals at
home. First aid and home nursing
courses are of little real value, but
hospitals are anxious for women to
take up regular courses in nursing.
In most of the best hospitals, credit
for a full year will be given to grad-
uates of approved colleges, who have
had the proper preparation in scien-
tific and social courses. This will
lengthen the regular nurses' two-year
course one year.
Junior Women Pilot Freshman Girls
One hundred and forty junior wom-
en have, cared for nearly 500 fresh-
man girls since their arrival.
The work consisted in meeting
trains, finding accommodations for
the new students, and assisting them
in the task of registration. Much of
the service, in charge of Anna Mc-
Mahon, '19, took place in University
hall, where a rest room was maintain-
ed under the direction of Groeso
Gaines, '19.
The: work, which is most active
during the first few weeks, continues
phroughout the year, and the juniors
will entertain their freshmen at the
annual Junior Advisor supper, which
will follow Dean Myra Jordan's tea to
freshman women, Monday afternoon,
Oct. 8.
German Captain Violates Mann Act
Philadelphia, Oct. 2.-Captain Max
Phidichadms, former commander of
the seized German commercial raider,
was today found guilty of violating
the Mann act in bringing a woman
from Ithaca, N. Y., for improper pur-
poses.
Sentence was postponed pending
disposition for a motion for a new

trial. The German captain also is
under imbatement and a charge of
violating the postal laws in sending
an improper letter to a school teacher
in Saginaw, Mich.
Will Train Negroes at Each Camp
Washington, Oct. 2.-With plenty
of room available at the national army
cantonments, due to the large num-
ber of men soon to be withdrawn to
fll up the national guard and other
branches, the war department has
again modified its plans for negro
troops of the national army forces.
It is now the purpose, Secretary Bak-
er, said today, to train a complete
unit of negroes at each of the 16 can-
tonnments.
Basket ball and Gym shoes. Wag-
ner & Co. State St. at Liberty.-Adv.

11

1

I

I

Conklin &VSwan Pens

Military
r Al arm ~
Clocks
Guaranteed
$1.25
HALLER & FULLER
State Street Jewelers
-
Agents for
GRUEN VERITHIN AND BRACELET WATCHES

mmm

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B-I-C S-A-L-E
Jo SUMMER RESORT PIANOS
COMMENCING MONDAY, OCTOBER 1st, 1917
GR INN ELL B ROS.
MUSIC HOUSE
116 SO. MAIN ST. ANN ARBOR

F

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