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This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

October 03, 1917 - Image 6

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1917-10-03

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

WEDNESDAY,

THE MICHIGAN DAILY WEDNESDAY,

DANCING
e Packard Academy every
and Thursday evenings, 7:30
beginning October 8th. Also
on in modern dancing. Ad-
per couple 50c; single 25c.
lessons by appointment.-
tf.
iize Our Advertisers.-Adv.

Michigan. Dames After More Members
The society of Michigan Dames has
started a campaign for new members
by hanging placards advertising the
society in all the buildings, with slips
of paper attached on which prospec-
tive members are asked to sign their
names.
Patronize Our Advertisers.-Adv.

r

RE

ODEIE

WE TRY TO SERVE
YOU RICHT
You will find our
Lunches, Candies, and
Sodas more delicious
than ever ::: :
We are still featuring
Bloomfield's Chocolates
in the Yellow and Blue
Boxes, known wherever
Michigan Men may be

PROFESSORS TO ASSIST
IN MILITARY TRAINING
DR. MAY WILL HAVE CHARGE OF
ALL PHYSICAL TRAIN.
ING
Nine professors of the University
faculty have volunteered their services
to students enrolled in the military
course under Lieutenant G. C. Mullen
of the United States army.
Among those to give lectures every
Wednesday afternoon at 4 o'clock to
the military students are:
Prof. W. H. Hobbs, director of the
geological laboratory and museum;
Prof. W. C. Hoad, of the engineer col-
lege; Prof. H. L. Wilgus, of the Law
school; Prof. A. E. Boak, of the his-
tory department; Prof. J. S. Reeves,
of the literary college, and Prof. H.
C. Adams of the economics depart-
ment.
Dr. George A. May, director of Wa-
terman gymnasium, will have charge
of the physical training of the students
in these courses. Professors Johnson
and Hobbs will give assistance in
sketching and the use of the sind
table. Several professors from the
medical college will give lectures on
important subjects. Lieutenant Mul-
len will also talk to the students when
the weather hinders outdoor drill.
Men Report This Afternoon
All men registered in Lieut."Mul-
len's military course are to report at
4:30 o'clock this afternoon outside of
Waterman gymnasium. The men will
then be divided into two groups.
One division will be composed of
men who have had military experience
and can give instruction, and another
of those who have had no experience.
The men who have had no military
experience will then be lined up in
rank, and separated into squads of
seven each.
Experienced Men to Instruct
Men who have had experience will
be assigned to each' of these squads
and act as instructors. Over each
group of eight squads a member of
the faculty will superintendent the
work.
Instruction will be given during the
first semester in the position of the
soldier, marching, and a general in-
troduction to military science and
tactics.

FlYE MICHiGAN MBEN'
GET BERTHS IN FRANCE
FORESTRY EXPERTS WITH TENTH
ENGINEER CORPS ON
TRENCH WORK
Offering their lives as well as their
services to their country, four grad-
uates and one undergraduate of the
forestry department of the University;
of Michigan are now "Somewhere in
France" with the Tenth Engineer
corps of the regular army, aiding
trench and railroad construction and
,the logging operations in the French
forests.
The Michigan men, all of whom have
received commissions, are: H. L. Gis-
born, '17; C. J. Kraebel, '15; Willett
Ramsdell, '15; O. F. Schafer, '15, and
J. C. Andrews, '18. Their commands
are recruited wholly from thectimber
districts of the country and contain
men who are experienced in all phases
of the lumbering industry.
The Tenth Engineers are already in
the zone of active operations, their
work being largely along trench, rail-
road and building construction. The
timber is cut under the directions of
the skilled foresters and goes through
the same steps as in this country until
the raw lumber is procured.

SENATE PASSES $10,000,000
APPROPRIATION FOR FAMILIES
Washington, Oct. 2.-An appropria-
tion of $10,000,000 for the payment of
family expenses of enlisted men in ac-
tive service of the army, navy, and
marine, carried as proposed in a bill
introduced by Senator Riker of Cali-
fornia.
Plate glass screens are used at the
University of California infirmary to
prevent the nurses receiving colds of
students suffering from the different
forms which the disease takes.
A complete set of chimes, 12 in
number have recently been presented
to the University of California to hang
in the Campanile.

Babbitt, '19E, New Technic Editor
W. C. Babbitt, '19E, has been ap-
pointed managing editor of the Tech-
nic, engineering magazine, to take the
place of H. S. Taylor, '17E, who is
going into service. The first number
of the Technic will appear the latter
part of this month.
Notice: Before engaging music for
your parties for the coming season,
consult Shorty -Prescott about his
Majestic Theatre orchestra. Also his
novelty and jazz combinations.
Special prices for fraternities and ror-
orities for series. Shorty Prescott,
Phone 1588-J 220 W. Ann St.-Adv.
"Ike" Fisher's music at opening as-
sembly at Armory Saturday night.-
Adv.

L1 400004

ooL u

For Just Three Hours
Today You Can Buy Any
Betty Wales Serge Dress
at a Saving

*
*
*
*
*
*
*

AT THE THEATERS
YOUJ CAN GO TO-
"Odds and Ends of 1917," at the
Garrick.
"Miss Springtime," at the Whit-
ney, Monday, Oct. 8.
Vaudeville, at the Majestic.

*
*
*
*

Betty Wales frocks have achieved such a reputation
for style cleverness and originality, for ekcellent qual-
ity of materials and workmanship and genuine worth that
this very unusual announcement of reduced prices-
though even for three hours in the afternoon-will bring
enthusiastic response.
Young women of high school and college age, par-
ticularly, will be delighted with the opportunity of choos-
ing a favored model at much less than its regular selling
price.
The complete display will be at your disposal this
afternoon from 2:00 to 5:00 at average reductions of
more than ONE FOURTH.

,vir

L
G

I;

*1

Come in and see our newer
more beautiful store

and

':
-,

* * * * * * * * * * * * * *

1I

13 orn fields

Next week's attraction at the Gar-
rick is Norworth and Shannon's "Odds
and Ends of 1917," announced as a
musical revue.
It is not a revue of New York the-
atrical successes, but rather a satirical
travesty on events and episodes of
the day. The serious atmosphere is
conspicuously lacking, although there
are occasional allusions to the trouble
"over there." One of the songs is en-

SALE PRICES
$13.75, $16.75, $18.75, $21.75
(Fashion Salon-Second Floor)

709 North Universitys

titled,

"Sometime,

Somewhere with

Pershing," showing a trench named
"Broadway and Forty-Second Street.'

®
iii

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1917-1918

Ann

Arbor

Concerts

HILL AUDITORIUM

THE WORLD'S GREATEST MUSICAL ATTRACTIONS

AMELITA GALLI-CURCI

EUGENE YSAYE
BELGIAN VIOLINIST

ETHEL LEGINSKA

IN SONG RECITAL

With Flutist and Pianist
THURSDAY, OCTOBER 11, 1917
8:00 o'Clock

FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 9, 1917

8:00 o'Clock

Amelita Galli-Curci is an Italian by birth,
a cosmopolite by artistic inclination, an ac-
complished pianist, a talented composer, and
a linguist of rare attainments. She was born
in Milan of Spanish-Italian parents, and is
a graduate of the Musical Conservatory of
her native city, where she won honors as a
pianist and composer. At the suggestion of
Mascagni, she added singing to her other
accomplishments by teaching herself, and
made a brilliant debut at the Costanzi
Theatre in Rome. Later, she sang at the
Khedivial Theatre at Cairo, and then at the
principal Opera houses in Milan, Naples,
Petrograd, Madrid and Buenos Ayres.
Although Mme. Galli-Curci had had six
years of unfailing successes abroad, the rec-
ognized idol of Spain; to say naught of her
own country, and South America, she was
comparatively unknown in the United States,
prior to her sensational debut in Chicago,
less than a year ago. No extravagant claims
were advanced on her behalf; she was in no
wise a "prepared sensation."
Mme. Galli-Curci sings in five languages,
via.: Italian, Spanish, French, German and
English, and is one of the few excptions
among operatic stars, who is quite as much
at home on the concert as on the operatic
stage.

Wherever music connoiseurs are
to be found; wherever there is a pub-
lic which is musically inclined, in
whatever spot Eugene Ysaye has'
appeared there is but a single opin-
ion, that the Belgian musician is the
master violinist of the world. Some
experts, whose judgment is founded
on that calmness of mind that in-
spires profound respect for their
opinion, assert that it is a serious
question if there ever lived a violin
player who was Ysaye's equal.
That any of the celebrated masters
of earlier periods were his superiors
seems, to them, to be outside the
range of consideration.
At the age of fifty-one, Eugene
Ysaye brings to his endeavors a
ripeness of interpretative skill, a
breath of musical view which com-
mand unqualified respect. His art
is the perfectly matured development
of what many believe to be genius;
an art resting upon gifts of the lofti-
est order which have been develop-
ed to their approximate limit by a
sincere, earnest musician whose in-
tellectuality matches his great emo-
tional endowments.

THE PADEREWSKI OF
WOMEN PIANISTS
MONDAY, DECEMBER 10, '17
8:00 o'Clock
Leginska, the pianistic mar-
vel, stands alone as a master
interpreter of rare intelligence
and unbounded charm. Deli-
cacy and taste, personality and
temperament, coupled with un-
usual creative idealism stamp
this remarkable Leschetizky
pupil as the foremost woman
pianist of the day.
Technique is one of the nec-
essary attributes of a great pian-
ist virtuoso, but it is no mere
display of digital dexterity
which wins in the case of Le-
ginska. Nor is it as a mere re-
producer of great thoughts by
means of the piano-forte where-
in her appeal rests. Leginska's
key to power is an evanescent
creative ability which individu-
alizes each work. Leginska
gives out so much of heself that
she invariably arouses the in-
tellectual and the emotional in
the great audiences held spell-
bound by her art. .
Her characteristics are:
Ease, tranquility, concentrated
power, undeviating elegance
delightful beyond telling.

THE NEW YORK SYMPH-
ONY ORCHESTRA
WALTER DAMROSCH, Conductor
WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 16, 1918
8:00 o'Clock
The Symphony Society of New
York is nearly forty years old and
it has had but two conductors, Dr.
Leopold Damrosch, the founder,
and his son, Walter Damrosch, the
present conductor.
Dr. Leopold Damrosch was a
musician of European fame, but was
destined to find in the New World
his field of widest activity. The
Symphony Society was organized
by him in 1878 and immediately
took a leading place in the musical
life of New York.
Walter Damrosch was but twen-
ty-three when he succeeded his fath-
er as conductor and proved himself
marvellously adapted and qualified
for the work. He held his men to-
gether; he produced one intricate
masterpiece after another; until his
public is the entire United States.
For many years the orchestra was
maintained by his personal efforts
and popularity, until the happy day
when Mr. Harry Harkness Flagler
endowed the Symphony Society
with $100,000 a year, the largest
endowment received by any sym-
phony orchestra in the world.

By the matchless beauty of her art
through a personality that reflects sincerity
and lovableness, Julia Culp, the renowned
Dutch lieder -singer, has won the profound
regard of the discriminating musical public
of America. Connoisseurs of artistic singing
have declared that not since the days when
Lilli Lehmann was in her prime have they
heard such beautiful and lofty interpreta-
tions of the classical art songs as Madame
Culp presents at her recitals. "Julia Culp,"
they aver, "is in a class by herself." Pos-
sessing extraordinary versatility, she sounds
the gamut of emotions and she does it all
without a trace of affection or exaggeration,
leaving her hearers uplifted and longing to
hear her again. There is something in the
timbre of Julia Culp's voice that suggests
eternal spring, something that grips and
moves, something that in one song stirs the
soul and in another awakens mirth. The
Culp programs are prized by the armies of
young singers, teachers and students that
flock to the Culp recitals. Intelligent ama-
teurs are no less enthusiastic. Though her
first triumphs in this country were made by
her superb renditions of German lieder,
Madame Culp's repertoire includes many
examples of old and modern French songs,
old Italian airs, early and modern English
songs.

JULIA CULP
IN SONG RECITAL

FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 15, 1918
8:00 o'Clock

Course Tickets may be ordered by mail now-and will be filled in'
advance in order of receipt-Patrons tickets, $6.00 each; Regular
Course tickets, $4.00, $3.50, $3.00, each. Tickets not taken by
mail will be placed on sale at Hill Auditorium as follows at 8 A. M.

Patrons' Tickets-Saturday, Oct. 6; $4.00 tickets, Monday,
Oct. 8; $3.50 tickets, Tuesday, Oct 9; $3.00 tickets, Wednesday,
Oct. 10; single concert tickets Wednesday, Oct. 10, 1:00 P. M.,
$1.00, $1.50, $2.00.

I

Address all Mail Orders to CHARLES A" SINK, Secretary, SCHOOL OF MUSIC

A.

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