100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Download this Issue

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

November 03, 1917 - Image 2

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1917-11-03

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

THE MICHIGAN DAILY SARDAY, NOVnMa , 1*1t.
at $3.25, Fully guaranteed as to Fit and Wear
Correct Corduroy Trousers N F ALLEN PANY
For Junior Engineers MAIN STREET

Ssociated Press is exclusively entitlea
isa for republication of all news dis-
credited to it or not otherwise credit
his paper and also the local news
d herein.
l newspaper at the University of
a . Published every morning except
during the university year.
d at the postoffice at Ann Arbor as
as matter.
: Ann Arbor Press Building. Sub-
G:b aier,$.S; by :mail, $.0.
stations: Quarrys; Students', up-
; The Delta. Ph nes: Business, 96o;
,2414. -
unications not to exceed oo words
, or notices of events will be pub-
ail at he discreton of the
lfatteofcie in the Ann Arbor
dg, or in the notice box in the west
ofthe general library, where the
are lectedrat :30 o'cloc each
Z'. McDonald......Managing Editor
aEmery.........Business Manager
itor ...............Harry M. Carey
tor................C. S. Clark, Jr.
ditor ......James Schermrhorn, Jr.
SEdtor..........Bruce A. Swaney
h Edito....... .. rue Millar'
Editor.r..........Philip C. Pack
Editor........Mildred C. Mighell
Ei tor ........MargaretHE. JCooley
ditor......lert E.HloreJr.
Kakinson....Advertising Manager
Chtolett . Publication anger
hy.......Circulation Manager
R. Smith..........Credit Manager
LeFevre..........Office Manager
>rth Robinson..Subscription Manager
NIGHT EDITORS
G. Wilson Clarence L. Roeser
Mark K. Ehbert.
REPORTERS.
t Weinerman Edgar L. Rice
waes'" ' J. R. McAlpine
Osius. Jr Paul A. Shinkman
ipel Vera Brown
. Bromley K. FrancesrHandiH o
Eugene Given,
BUSINESS STAFF
porer "Orile E. "Gates
Seidger Harry D. Hause
Baad Lambert Hrshemer
Frank N. Gaethke
JRDAY, NOVEMBER 3, 1917
it Editor-Herbert G, Wilson
DON'T GRUMBLE
. you groan over rising to make
o'clock class, think of one of
ends in the camps or trenches.
on open your sleep-laden eyes
the feeble rising sun of early
your old friends Will probably
ten their mess and engaged in
.es of the day.
u have grumbled, aren't you
ittle bit ashamed?
e long, you will have become
d to the new program; before
will be spring, when early ris-
natural. And then the- extra
ur you have in the afternoon
re you aplenty of time to get
> the boat house and into your
and get an early start. Let's
to overwhelm the wisdom of
ents with a miscellaneous cdat-
udent opinion, not instituted in
, but rather outcropping from
. Let's be Michigan men and
The earlier start is a war-
cessity. '
THE 1917 DIRECTORY
ugh somewhat slower than last
ecord run, The 1917 Directory
eserves commendation for the
in publishing. Mack and
were about a week slower than
L, which is to be expected with
t of the usual experienced staff
r seasons.
are bound to be errors in a
tion whose first essential is
d of speed. Many of the er-
uld have been corrected had
lents themselves taken the pro-
iasures when the opportunity
t before them.
Daily has in the past learned
orrow that the information in
rectory is not always correct.
not mean that every possible
ras not made to eliminate ar-
But since there are errors in
, The Daily is bound to repeat

rrors except in cases where weI
plied with other facts.

Just at present you can
it sunny Italy-

hardly call

This latest change in chancellors
doesn't prove much. What we're all
waiting for is not the resignation of
a chancellor, but that of the kaiser.
IWtomen
Board of representatives of' the
women's league will meet at 9 o'clock
this morning at Barbour gymnasium.
Girls interested in telling stories
to children in, the hospitals are invited
to meet at 3 o'clock Wednesday after-
noon at the Methodist church for in-
struction.
Hockey practice for sophomores at
9:30 o'clok this morning, juniors and
seniors at -10:30 o'clock, and fresh-
men at 12:45 o'clock.
Base hospital No. 17 with the Ameri-
can army in France needs 1,000 hospi-
tal bags. Every woman with a free
hour Monday morning should spend it
at the Angell house helping in this
work.
Michigan Dames will meet Monday
evening at Newberry hall. All wives
of students are invited.
From six to eight girls have signed
up for the Mandolin club which is
open to all but freshmen. All girls
who play guitars are also invited to
join.
Michigan Society of Dames will meet
Monday at 7:30 o'clock' in Newberry.
hall. Mrs. Jenny Buell will speak on
"Food Conservation" and Mrs. C. C.
Peters will give a piano solo. All
students' wives and their friends are
invited to come. -
SCENARIOS READY
FOR JUNIOR PLAYI

Entertainment Originated
"Buster Brown at
igan"

in 1904 with
Mich-

-'.t
Scenarios for the annual Junior
Girls' play, which will be presented
sometime in the spring, are now in
the hands of the manuscript commit-
tee. Competition for lyrics and music
will open after a choice of these has
been made.
Prof. John R. Brumm will direct the
production. Emily Powell, '19, is the
manager.
The play is the outgrowth of a sug-
gestion of Dean Myra B. Jordan in
1904 that the juniors plan an original
entertainment in honor. of the senior
class. Accordingly, "Buster Brown at
Michigan" appeared, a playlet eharact-
erized by take-offs on various seniors.
This was followed in 1905 by the first
real junior play, "Everysenior."
Since that time the play has devel-
oped remarkably. It is now entirely
the work of the junior women, assist-
ed only by Professor Brumm. In "The
Come-Back," in 1915 the girls for the
first time wrote all the music them-
selves.,
This same year the play was given
in Toledo at the invitation of the Asso-
clation of Collegiate alumnae. In
1916 "The Yankee Yogi" gave a per-
formance in Detroit. These have been
the only two productions to make an
appearance outside of Ann Arbor.
The plot always centers around
some topic of current interest on cam-
pus, and the setting is usually some-
where about the University, although
"The Yankee Yogi" succeeded in main-
taining a local atmosphere in a for-
eign setting.

FRESHMAN SKS WHY
MILITARY AFFAIRS SUFFER LACK
OF INTEREST HERE, HE DE-
CLARES.
Editor, The Michigan Daily:
Freshmen are not taking as active
a part in the military affairs of the
University as might be expected. I
have heard much discussion on the
campus as to the reasons for this lack
of greater patriotism, but it seems
that no definite reason for it pre-
vails.
There are splendid opportunities of-
fered. every one taking this work in
the way of physical and mental devel-
opment. With drill each evening, one
soon becomes hardened physically and
accustomed to hardships with which
the average man does not come in con-
tact. Not only will this training be
a benefit to himself but also a benefit
to his country when the time comes
when he is called to its aid.
In case a call should be made with
a lower age limit, those included who
have had previous military training
will be more capable of filling
positions of responsibility and will
be given the preference. From
all present indications, this call will
be made, so, why don't they
take advantage of this wonderful
opportunity and fit themselves for any
emergency?
Freshmen should awaken before it is
too late.
The class of '21 must show its spirit:
and be there with good, true American
loyalty to show what it can do.
FRESHMAN.
WOMEN'S PATRIOTIC LEAGUE
BOASTS 200,001 MEMBERS
No Active Campaign in University Be
gun as Yet; Vigorous Drive
SOON
The Patriotic league of America now
boasts a membership of 200,001. This
movement organized last spring by
special war workers of Y. W. C. A.
has been spreading very rapidly
throughout the nation.
A large number of Ann Arbor Y. W.
C. A. members have already joined
but there has been no active campaign
here yet. Owing to pressure of work,
Miss Florence Pride, general secretary
of the city association, has been un-
able to organize a junior league among
the high school girls. She expects to
do this soon and begin a vigorous
campaign.
Two thousand girls in Battle Creek
and Kalamazoo have joined th league
and the work is progressing rapidly
In Battle Creek the work is being done
'nder the direction of Miss Elsa Hahn,
and in Kalamazoo under the direction
of Miss Helen Chapin.
No money is required, but members
take the following pledge: "Realizing
my nation's need I will express my
patriotism by doing whatever work I
have to do to the best of my ability.
I will be dignified, thoughtful of the
welfare of others, including women of
other nations, careful to keep such
standards of living as shall make me
a good citizen. I will render whatever
service I can, at this time, to my
country."
Dr. Caroline B. Crane Talks In Detroit
Dr. Caroline Bartlett Crane, state
chairman of the women's committee
of the Council of National Defense,
will address a meeting of the National
Municipal League, to be held in De-
troit Nov. 20, on "The Housewife and
the Marketing Problem."
"Feeding Our Cities in War Time"

will be the general topic for the even-
ing program. Everett Colby, of New
Jersey, Clarence Kates, of Philadel-
phia, and George D. Perkins, of New
York are among the speakers.
Soap Shortage Pleases Hoboes
Detroit, Nov. 3.-Hurrahs from ho-
bo camps throughout Michigan greet-
ed the news that the nation must econ-
omize in the use of soap. Warnings
recently issued that the war will
work disaster on the soap user brought
no consternation to Weary Willie. He
gloats in the idea that the fats and
glycerine used in the soap are also
used in the manufacture of explos-
ives.

GYMNASIUM OPENS FOR
FRESHMANCLSSES MONI
MEN TAKING MILITARY DRILL
WILL BE GIVEN WORK IN
COMPANIES
Gymnasium classes for freshmen in
in the engineering and Literature, Sci-
ence, and the Arts colleges will com-
mnce Monday afternoon.
A co-operative system has been es-
tablished for all freshmen who have
joined the various military companies
under Lieut. George C. Mullen. Instead
of classifying individually, as in the
past, freshmen will classify and come
to the gymnasium at the appointed
hours, where all the yearlings will
form ranks according to their posi-
tion in the different companies.
Whenever 5 o'clock gymnasium
classes are held, all of the freshmen
will fall in in front of the entrance of
Waterman gymnasium at 4 o'clock.
This division will be in charge of a
company officer, who will drill the men
in the neighborhood of the gymnasium
until 4:45 o'clock, when the cadets
will break ranks and go to the gym-
nasium and line up for regular gym-
nasium work.
Freshmen who are signed up for
4:15 o'clock gymnasium classes, will
line up directly in front pf Waterman
gymnasium, instead of going to Ferry
field. Ranks will be broken at the giv-
en signal, and they will appear on
gymnasium floor for regular work.
Absences from gymnasium classes
will be counted the same as absences
from drill. All absences require two
hours extra work. Tardiness will also
be treated in a similar manner, one
hour additional gymnasium work for
each time a cadet is late.
Dr. George A. May, physical director
of Waterman gymnasium, advises all
freshmen to obtain a locker and a suit-
able gymnasium outfit. The arrange-
ments are a fore-runner for the work
which will be carried on by the upper-
classmer, who are taking military
training, during the winter months.
Following is the gymnasium sched-
ule for freshmen taking military drill:
First regiment, Companies A, B, C, D,
E, and F, 4:15 o'clock, Monday and 5
o'clock Thursday; first regiment, Com-
panies G, H, I, K, L and M, 5 o'clock
Manday and 4:15 o'clock Thursday;
second regiment, Companies A, B, C,
D, E, and F, 4:15 o'clock Tuesday, and
5 o'clock Friday; second regiment,
Companies G, H, I, K, L, and M, 5
o'clock, Tuesday, and 4:15 o'clock Fri-
day.
Commends Women on Liberty Loan
"Women of the University are to
be highly commended for the remark-
ably good showing made by them in
the recent Liberty Loan campaign,"
asserted Francis Bacon, '02, director
of social activities at the Michigan
Union.
Althugh it has been deemed ad-
visable by the committee who were in
charge of the canvass, to publish no
detailed list of contributions and don-
ors, it has been determined that Mich-
igan women responded to the loan in
as great a degree as did the men.
OFFICERS TO DRILL WOMEN
IN MILITARY MARCHING
Military marching for women, un-
der the personal direction of a regular
army officer, is meeting with such
enthusiasm, that work is to be start-
ed two weeks earlier than was first
contemplated.
The officer in charge has requested
that all women who have signed up

for this class, report for two prelimin-
ary meetings at 7 o'clock Nov. 7 and
14, at Barbour gymnasium.
The purpose of these two metings
is to organize and instruct women to
enable them to give assistance in the
regular class, which starts Nov. 21.
Corporals of squads will be chosen
from those appearing at the prelimin-
ary meetings.
Gymnasium authorities are desir-
ous of making this course one of the
most important athletic activities for
women.
Dancing at Armory every Saturday
night from 9 to 12. Admission 75c.-
Adv.

SPECIAL This week only
1 Pound Michigan Seal Stationery
2 Packages Envelopes, to match
75c
~T~mPD'QBOOK
L SHOP
PHONE 480

r

I

S ,
I
'i li.

CourtCafe
Tasty Steaks, Chops
REGULAR D IN N1E4R DAILY
Q U I C K S E R VAIC E
AND THE B E S T OF FOOD'
Special Sunday Chicken Dinners, 40c
108" EAST # URtON STREET

Engineers---Listen!
Do you know that the clever little instrument,
Known as the
Rust Letterig Scale
Can again be had-a most wonderful time-saver.
Ask to see it
Price $1.25
University Boelatore

SAFETY RAZORS
All of the standard makes from Ithe
dollar ones up.

I THE EBERBACH & SON CO:
200-204 EAST LIBERTY STREET

._. .._

- hi

hoping that Italy turns

the

m clocks are doubly useful
he 7:30 classes in effect.
umber of former "beauty nap-
are still wishing they didn't
o many of those early classes.
now Chicago wants a chance at
an's team.
telegraph men and linotype
ors still wish that they would.
hting across the pond in one
lice to overwork the "z's" and
n Russia and Italy.

Professor Wenley Raps Ignorance
In an address before the Women's
league yesterday, Prof. R. M. Wenley
commented upon the unexcusable ig-
norance of the majority of University
students of campus activitieq and the
general history of their Alma Mater.
The program was concluded by a so-
10 by Alice Lloyd, School of Music,
and a short address by the president,
Anna Lloyd, '18. Dancing followed,
at which about 400 girls were present.

CoMPrightRart Scha ner& Marx
A new military
overcoat
Wear it on cool days this
fall or on rainy days.
Hart Schaffner
& Ma'rx
made it, which means it will
stand good hard wear and
tear, and give you the best
kind of a value.
Several variations for men,
and young men.
Reule-Conlin-
Fiegel Co.
The big store at the south-
east corner Main and Wash-
ington Streets-downtown.

DETROIT UNITED LINES
Between Detroit, Ann Arbor and Jackson
(E~ffective May 22, 1917)
Detroit Limited and Express Cars-7:38a.
in., 8:ro a. in.. and hourly to 7:ro p. n., 9:xo
p. in.
Kalamazoo Limited Cars--8:48' a. m. and
every two hours to 6:48 u. n.; to Lansing.
8:48 p. mn
Jackson Express Cars ;local. stops west of
Ann Arbor)- :48 a. in. and every two hours
to 748 V. M.
Local Cars East Bound----s-.3 a. mn.. 6:40
a. n., 7:os a. n. and every two hoursto 7:os
p. in.. 81:o0'5; m.,9:05 p.,in., 10:56 p., M.
To Ypsilanti only, q :zo a. in., 9:50 a in..
2:05 p. M.. 6:o5 p. n, 9:4S p. n, 11:43 p.-
12:20 a. i..1:10 a. M., x:zo aM. ro Saline.
change at Ypsilanti.
Local Cars West Bound-6:os a. in., 748
a. 10 x:2, p. 1111, 12:20 a. n.
We have both the inclination and.
the equipment to furnish the
best in banking service
The Ann Arbor Savings Bank
INgORPORATRD 1869
Capitalland Surplus $ 500,000.00
Resources . . . $4,000,000.00
Northwest Corner Main and
Huron Streets
707 North University Avenue
Do You Know that the
SUGAR BOWL
has one of the best equipped
Candy Stores in the state? :
They have their own Refrigerating
System, and make. their own Ice
Cream and Candies.. ....
You aret invited to 'visit and in-
spect their plant.
Phone 967 109S. Main St.

I

I

I

ommommmm.
wmm .

...-...

Your every Bank-
ing need fulfilled at
THA

Michiganenslan Sale Reported Good
Michiganensian sales have been
larger than was -anticipated. This is
considered remarkable as it was fear-
ed that the loss of 500 students which
the class has suffered would decrease
the demand for the annual book.

ml llr o.en man

1

lu i-lub ;50.1

main

330 so. Stat
(Nickels Area

THE

817-M

I

A

A

A

Back to Top

© 2021 Regents of the University of Michigan