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November 03, 1917 - Image 1

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1917-11-03

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WEATHER
ALLY FAIL AND
WARNER

r gjow

ASSOCIAT
a~i4 ~_PRESS
rDYAND IGIHT[
ciDAY SERVICE

L. XXVIII. No. 29.

ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN, SATURDAY, NOVEMBER 3, 1917.

PRICE

..

9T[ON ISNE SE
RED OF ORDEAL, TEUTONS
WILL PROBABLY FALL BACK
TO LAON
USSIANS NOT TO QUIT
VORLD WAR-KERENSKY

WAR INDUSTRIES
GET FUEL FIRST
Domestic Consumers To Be Supplied
Ahead of All Manufact.
urers, Though
Washington, Nov. 3.-Regulations
designed to restrict the use of coal in
industries considered non-essential
to the conduct of the war will be put
in force soon by the food, administra-
tion.
The plan under consideration pro-
vdes for a classification of industries

200 MEN TAKENIN
WAR FUND DRIVE
Organization of $25,000 Campaign for
Soldiers in Cantonments
Nears Completion
MEETING OF SOLICITORS
'SUNDAY FOR INSTRUCTION
Women to Enter Canvass Same as Men
Coinmitte Confident of Early
Success

Are Securely Holding
New Line of De-
fense

Their in the order of their importance andI

:1 ,

(By Associated Press)
The Germans have retreated from
points along the Chemin-des-dames
sector on the Aisne front in France
where for several months the French
troops had been keeping them sharply
to task.
Just where the retrograde movement
took place, and how far it extends,
cannot yet be told for the German of-
ficial communication annuoncing it
merely says that the Teutons, "unnotic-
ed and undisturbed by the enemy," sys-
tematically ripped through their lines
from the hilly front of this region.
It seems apparent, however, that the
Germans, tired of the terrible ordeal
they have been forced to undergo for
sometime from the French artillery
and violent infantry attacks, have de--
cided to fall back upon Laon, capital
of the department of the Aisne, which
with its net work of railways has been
the quest of the French.
Russia Will Fight
Although, according to the Russian
Premier, Russia is war worn and be-
lieves she has the right to claim that,
the Allies now should take the heaviest
part of the burden off her shoulders,
the new Republic has no intention to
declare herself out of the war.
"Help," he said, "was urgently need-
ed, especially in the form of money
and supplies." -He appealed to the
world not to lose faith in the Russian
revolution.
On the Italian front, the Austro-
Germanss and Italians are in combat
along the middle and lower regions of
the Tagliamento river, with the Teu-
tonic forces on the east, and General
Cadorna's army on the western side
of the stream.
So far as is known, the enemy has
not yet been able to cross the river,
which is in freshet, but it seems ap-
parent that from the Carnic Alps
south along the battle line to the
head of the Adriatic, the Italians now
are holding their line of defense secure-
ly. On' the other fronts there have
been no engagements of great im-
portance.
Berlin Claims Gains
Berlin, via London, Nov. 2.- The
Eastern bank of the Tagliamento river,
from the Fella valley to the Adriatic
Sea, has been cleared of Italians ac-
cording to the German official com-
munication issued today.
On the middle and lower sectors of
the,. Tagliamento, the Austro-German
armies are in fighting contact with
the Italians. The communication says
that the Italians who have been hold-
ing out along the eastern bank of the
Tagliamento either wre compelled to
retire or were made prisoners.
Railroad Rails Double in Value
Rail equipment of the New York
Central railroad has more than doubl-
rd in value during the past three years
according to statements just isuued by
Alfred H. Smith, president of the
road.
This increase, he explains, is due to
the enormous demand of the warring
nations for railroad, supplies. Costs
for new equipment have soared while
freight rates have remained practically
stationary. He believes that, the rail-
roads of the United States are in a
position to win the war if they are
given the privilege of earning revenues
commensurate with their great ex-
pense.
3unior Laws Elect Officers At Meeting
Junior Laws elected the following
officers at a meeting of the class yes-
terday morning: President, 0. P.
Lambert; vice-president, S. J. Slav-
ens; secretary,' E. D. Kirkby; treas-
urer, L. L. Pollock; oratorical dele-

the issuance of a general order to
coal producers directing them to sup-
ply first manufacturing plants engag-
ed in war work.
Domestic consumers will be sup-
plied ahead of all industries and the
regulations will contain special pro-
vision for taking care of their re-,
quirements.

Beans And Spuds-
JMarines' Banquet
Washington, Nov. 3.-A dish of
beans, a "side order" of potatoesy, and
a cup of coffee, served "a la trench,"
-$1.51.r
That is the complete menu for a
"banquet" to be given by the United
States Marines at their Quantico
training camp, near here, during the
first week of November. The "ban-
quet" will be prepared on "rollin5
field kitchens," and the guests, offi-
cers, their wives, and enlisted men,
will dine from the tin mess-gear, used
by Marines in the field.
Through this novel affair, the Ma-
rines expect to raise over $10,000, and
will turn the money over to an estab-
lished war charity.'
MAY DRAFT PART OF EVERY
INDUSTRY -FOR WAR MATERIALS
Washington, Nov. 2.-Conscription of
industries to supply the needs of the
army was discussed today by the war
industries board with automobile and
accessories manufacturers who pledg-
'ed their full co-operation to the gov-
ernment in 'whatever is necessary to
win the war.
The plan is to divert a part of each
plant to the production of war mater-
ial. It was made plain, however, that
the government has no intention of
taking any drastic action which
would cripple the industry.
Today's conference is the first of
many to be held with makers of non-
essentials as the progress of the war
makes greater demands of the coun-
tries' fesources. All such industries
probably will be called upon to fall in
line behind the government in curtail-
ing production of everything not mak-
ing a direct contribution to the na-
tion's fighting efficiency.
DR.. BALME LECTURES IN BE-
HALF OF DOCTORS FOR CHINA
Dr. Harold Balme, professor of sur-
gery at the University of Shantong,
China, delivered a lecture in Lane
hall last night on "Medical Work In
China" to medical students, frater-
nity members, students' volunteer
band, and Chinese students.
Dr. Balme is touring this country
speaking at all universities in order
to arouse an interest among American
students in medical work in China.
He is to return to China next Janu-
ary.
Chinese Culture Found On 182 Stones
Peking, Nov. 3.-The library of the
School of the Sons of the Empire, an
ancient Chinese university which, it
is said, was in existence a thousand
years before the Christian era, com-
prises 182 tablets of stone, whereon
are carved all the "thirteen classics,'
the essence of Chinese culture.

I

Two hundred men have been taken
under the selective draft of the Uni-
versity Friendship war fund committee
to solicit and canvass the entire cam-
pus for Michigan's quota in the fund,
$25,000.
"It will take a large group of men to
handle the immense task of combing
the campus," declared Mr. N. C. Fetter,
secretary of the University Y. M. C. A.
"Every man upon whom we have call-
ed to assist in the work has answered
the call readily."
The men of the University have
been divided into two classes for con-
venience. Those who will captain the
teams working among the fraternities
are: Raymond M. Langley, '18E; Rob-
ert C. Patterson, '18; Herbert A. Dus-
tin, '18; C. A. Hart, '18E; R. R. Wins-
low, '19L. Those heading the solicitors
who will canvass those living in pri-
vate homes are: Neal Ireland, '18;
Harold Storz, '19; Lionel Crocker, '18;
Ralph Gault, '19; Edwin Cunliffe, '19.
A meeting of the two hundred men
and the leaders has been called for
Sunday evening at 6:30 o'clock at
Lane hall.
Speakers at the session will be the
Rev. Lloyd C. Douglas, publicity chair-
man of the national campaign, Mr. N.
C. Fetter, ,and Edwin Cunliffe, '19.
Anyone interested in the work of
raising the $25,000 which is Michigan's
part In the campaign of the students
and faculties of Amercian colleges and
universities in the United States to
raise a million dollars for work
among the soldiers of America in the
cantonments and in France as well
as the men of other nations on the
fighting fronts, is welcome. All the
war work is being conducted under th
auspices of the Y. M. C. A.
"There are 6,000,000 prisoners of war
in Germany and the allied nations
with whom the Y. M. C. A. must work
Some of the money raised in the $35,-
000,000 campaign, of which the stu-
dents' million is a part, will be used
for this purpose. The response for
campaigners in the drive has been all
that could be desired, and we look for
big results in the University," said Mr.
Fetter.
Women of Michigan are not to be
left out of the Friendship war fund.
A committee, of the following has
charge of the work in the University:
Dean Myra B. Jordan, Anna Lloyd, '18;
Miss Helen Bourke, '18; Miss Lemert,
secretary of the Y. W. C. A.
The faculty drive is in charge of
Francis Bacon, '02, director of social
activities at the Union. This part of
the campaign will probably begin
sooner than the student canvass on ac-
count of the smaller size of the former
body.
Bicycles are becoming more popu-
lar every day at the University of Il-
linois.

RED CROSS ROSTER.
BIG IN MICHIGAN
Muskegon, Jacksoi, and Alger Coun-
ties Show Large Proportionate
Membership Increase
Red Cross membership for fthe state
of Michigan numbers 462,718 accord-
ing to a report presented to Gov. A.
E. Sleeper yesterday. These are dis-
tributed among the 83 Red Cross chap-
ters n Michigan, one chapter to a
county.
The three counties standing high-
est in the state are Muskegon, Alger,
and Jackson. These are to be pre-
sented with large Red Cross banners.
Wayne county raised its member-
ship from 531,591 to 1,100,000, but the
increase was less in proportion to the
population than in the three above
mentioned counties.
At the time of the commencement
of the war in 1914, there were less
than 20,000 Red Cross members in the
entire United States, and only about
100 chapters. As late as April, 1916,
there were less than 50,000 members
in the entire United States and less
than 200 chapters. By February, 1917,
when our government severed diplo-
matic relations with Germany, there
were les than 300,000 members and
only 272 chapters. Michigan now has
163,908 more members than there
were in the entire United States last
February.
GERMAN TARS IN
ANOTHER MUTINY

ADAMS SPEAKS ON WAR
FINA C AND INDUSTRY
URGES PROGRAM WHICH WILL
CONSIDER WAR NEEDS
FIRST
Philadelphia, Pa.,- Nov. 2.--Dr. H. C.
Adams of the University of Michigan
was one of the speakers at today's
session of the war finance meeting of
the American Academy of political and
social science.
The chief topic discussed was
whether American industries should
be re-organized under government au-
spices to concentrate its full energy
upon production of war material, or
whether heavy taxes be levied to meet
the cost of the war under existing
system of industrial individualism. '
The necessity of a new socialized
age of industry in which the vast en--'
ergies of the nation be directed pri-
marily to the purposes of the war with
out the waste of competition was urged1
by Dr. Adams. The tasks of the na-
tional administraion would be simpli-
fied, he said by a bureau organization
of industry, elimination of "business
as usual," and the substitution of a
business program which shall con-
sider war needs first.
2ig Game Nola
Seems Certainty

EIGHT DEAD ANI
1MISSING FRC
VESSEL FINU
ABANDON SHIP IN LIFE I
UNTIL DANGER OF SINE
ING IS OVER
TRANSPORT DRY-DO4
IN FRENCH SEAP
Torpedo Hits Coal Bunker Doin
tle Damage; Will Be Repair
Soon
Washington, Nov. 2.-The torpe
of the homeward bound army
port Finland, in the war zone
days ago resulted in the death o
members of the naval armed g
two army enlisted men and fc
the ship's civilian crew. A third
seaman is missing.
Vice Admiral Sim'sh report o
casualty to the navy departmen
day added no details to the anno,
ment yesterday that the Finlan
been torpedoed, but had been a
reach a European port uner he:
steam.
Announcement that five of the
were drowned indicated to of
that the Finland's company lef
vessel in small boats until it was
certain that the ship, would re
afloat. The capsizing. of one c
boats in launching might accoun
the drowning of the men.
It was assumed that two o
armed guard were killed by the e
slion of the. torpedo and that he
ing one was probably blown over
by the explosion, as was a seam
the destroyer, Casgin, when she
torpedoed recently.
Finland in Dry Dock
A French Atlantic Sea Port, Ni
-The American transport, Finla
in the dry dock here. The vess
ceived such slight damages fron
German torpedo which recently s
here that it will not be long 1
she puts to sea again. The to
struck a coal bunker, which lea
the effect of the explosion.
Those injured on board the Fi
are in a hospital here.
STOCK SLUMP DUE
TO LIBERTY LC
Railroads Hard Hit By WYar Re
Bill; Commerce Commission
To Give Hearing

Sailors Of Kronprintz Throw Admiral
Schmidt Overboard; Stab
Officers
London, Nov. 2.-Three officers and
a number of sailors of the German
navy were killed in "another" mutiny
at Kiel early in September, according
to a dispatch from Amsterdam to the
Daily Express, which claims to have
authentic details.
The outbreak occurred aboard the
battleships Kronprintz and Schleswig-
Holstein and started when the men
revolted against being drafted into the
submarine service.
The sailors on the Kronprintz threw
Admiral Schmidt overboard and stab-
bed and threw overboard Lieutenant
Raul, the admiral's aide, and another,
officer. A battle on the ship's decks
between the officers and sailors fol-
lowed. Three officers and a number
of sailors were killed. Similar scenes
occurred on the Schleswig-Holstein.
Admiral Schmidt was rescued, but it
was necessary for him to leave .Kiel.
All the surviving mutineers were ar-
rested.
Vice Admiral von Capelle, German
minister of marine, announced in the
reichstag on October 9 the discovery
of a plot in the German navy. Dis-
patches from Amsterdam and London
reported that the crews of four battle-
ships of the German fleet had taken
part in a mutinous outbreak at Wil-
helmshaven.
Three of the ring leaders were shot,
while heavy sentences were imposed
on the others. This Qutbreak was said
to have occurred about six weeks ear-
lier or about the first of September.
Admiral von Capelle accused three
radical Socialist deputies of taking
part in the plot, but the German gov-
ernment has not taken any action
against the members of the reichstag.
Sororities of the University of Wis-
consin are holding a bowling tourna-
ment this year.

Emory Thomason, '04, managing ed-
itor of the Michigan Daily in 1904, and
chairman of the committee appointed
by the Michigan alumni in Chicago
to aid in securing the proposed Mich-
igan-Chicago game, came to Ann Ar-
bor yesterday to see P. C. Bartelme.
Mr. Bartelme was absent from the
city, having been called to Detroit
on business, and so Thomason will
wait until he returns, and will then
through Mr. Baraelme get in touch
with the members of the board in
control of ahtletics here. Although
the board will not meet until Novem-
ber 10, it is felt that something defi-
nite from the Michigan standpoint
can be learned when Thomason fin-
ishes his business.
According to Thomason, the Univer-
sity of Chicago feel about the game
as do the Michigan alumni, and a
committee, similar to the one appoint-
ed by the Wolverines' graduates in
the Windy City, has been created
which shall get in touch with the Chi-
cago faculty.
"Since the conference board has al-
ready taken a favorable stand on
other post-season games, among them
a contest between Minnesota and Ohio
State, I feel that the Chicago-Michi-
gan game will go through," declared
Thomason last night.
Alchemists Initiate Seven Men
Seven men were initiated into Al-
chemists, honorary chemical society,
last night. The new members are:
M. B. Doty, '18E; G. K. Finzel, spec.
P.; A. E. Barton, '18E; H. A. Rye,
'18E; R. B. Fast, '19P; H. W. Gaudy,
'19P; H. J. Mack, '19E.
Following the initiation a banquet
was held in Lane hall. Speeches were
given by Prof. W. G. Smeaton, Prof.
H. H. Willard, R. C. Germanson, '18E,
and M. B. Doty, '18E, R. S. Archer,
'16E, was toastmaster.
OCCUPANT OF TAXI HURT
IN CRASH WITH FORD CAR
Two smashed wheels and a broken
ankle were the result of a collision'
of a Yellow Bonnet taxi with a deliv-
ery Ford owned by Weinberg and
Kurtz, contractors, shortly after 1
o'clock yestesrday afternoon.
The taxi, which was carrying two
passengers to the Michigan Central
depot, was seriously damaged, but the
delivery truck came out of the acci-
dent with practically no injury. One
of the passengers of the taxi cab was
seriously shaken up and suffered a
broken ankle.

NORMAL CONCERT COURSE
FREDERICK ALEXANDER, Director
YPSILANTI MICHIGAN
POSTPONEMENT
Mr. Louis Grareure's Song Recitaly
2nd program of series, announced for Monday,
Nov. 5 has been postponed to
THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 22

Prices of stocks and bonds s
a general tendency to drop dur:
tober owing to the war reven
and the second Liberty Loan. 'I
mer, which went into effect Oc
indefinite in some respects,
shows plainly that the excess
tax will be felt in all kincjs c
nesses. In some the earnings,
to war conditions, are large
so that even the maximum ti
leave a large profit, but in
the distribution among stockb
will suffer severely.
Railroads will be hit the hard
the act. Other industries wil
the chance of recouping themse
taking advantage of invention
improvements. Labor and the
sities of a railroad have made
vancement in cost, but the roi
allowed no increase in rates.
These things coming at a" tim
our participation in war has ma
the utmost demands upon
portation, has made the pri
railroad bonds and shares
a new low record. This is
of the largest roads as well
smallest. The Interstate Cor
commission has agreed to give
ing to the roads' request for inc
rates in the near future. If
crease is granted prices will r
themselves quickly.
Sousa's Band Aids Detroit Rec
Detroit, Nov. 3.-John Philip
and his newly organized militar;
of three hundred pieces came
troit yesterday to assist Uncle
recruiting men for the United
navy. Sousa and his band wil
the city about a week, accord
present plans.
The new military band under
direction rivals the Sousa band

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