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This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

November 01, 1917 - Image 6

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1917-11-01

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Walk-Over-

INTELLIGENCE BUREAUT IS

I

WIIA'S GOING ON

Our
~ aaler"
For Women
Boot of unusual value,
>st distinctive style. In
rk brown and dark tan
issia calf, with the new
w military heel.
I sizes: Triple A to D

_._.- . -
jo ;
'.- fo
cI

[alk-Over Boot Shop
Hoffstetter, Prop. 115 S. Main Street

a

a

Students of the University of Michigan

Are invited to inspect our splendidly complete line
of handsome
all Suits and Overcoats
Smart, Clever Models
Pinch Back, Sack Coat, and full belted, in handsome
tweeds and plain cloths, single and double-breasted.

$19.50 to $40

.'

Nickels Arcade Cafeteria

IN TE

NOW SERVING
THE PUBLIC

NICKELS ARCADE

Where Cleanliness Is Paramount
'ARTICU3LAR PEOPLE PREFER
CE rs
ode from Pure Pasteurized Cream

UNION OFFICIAL TELLS OF AC.
TIVITIES DURING
WAR
"The Intercollegiate Intelligence
bureau is a national organization. It
is a clearing house between the gov-
ernment, and university and college
men throughout the country. There
are state organizations , Michigan's1
branch being located at Ann Arbor,
where the work is being done by the
Michigan union," states a Michigan
union official.
"As a part of the work of the Michi-
gan branch of the intelligence bureau,
an index has been made of the facul-
ty, student body, and alumni. As the
war continues, this index is being us-
ed more and more in locating men.
The departments of the index have
been organized in the University un-
dtr the following heads: Medical, le-
gal, science, engineering, economics,
social 'service, language, military
training, publicity, and information.
The bureau places the candidates in
positions where they will be of the
most service.
"In October, calls from the national
office in the Munsey building, Wash-
ington, have been made for: Inspec-
tion men for the ordinance depart-
ment; officers for technical duty with
the automobile section, carriage divis-
ion, ordinance department, men for
technical duty with the aircraft, engin-
eering division of the signal corps,
directors and assistants for the export
and administrative bureau, timber
draughtsmen, aviators for the naval
reserve flying corps, field topograph-
ers, ship draughtsmen, non-flying of-
ficers for clerical, administrative, and
executive service in the aviation
training school unit, men for techni-
cal duty in the equipment division of
the ordinance department, mechanical
engineers, engineers in forest prod-
ucts, and physicists for forest service.
"These calls have been sent to var-
ious schools in the country, and Mich-
igan is providing a large number of
men to fill the positions.
"During the summer months, arti-
cles were sent to the newspapers in
the states, on vital questions concern-
ing the war."
CITY NEWS
War bread is making its advent into
this city. With a first introduction
at the Arcade Festa last Friday and
Saturday nights, the bakeries of Ann
Arbor are soon going to take up its
manufacture and before long it will
be making its way into the home of
every family.
A record of 800 surgical dressings for
On Tuesdays, potato bread; Wed-
nesdays, cornmeal bread; Thursdays,
oatmeal bread; and Fridays, cornmeal
bread. Rice bread is also nuder
course of experiment.
Elks lodge entertained last night at
a Hallowe'en party, their first big af-
fair of the season. Refreshments and
dancing and an all round good time
were enjoyed by the Elks and the
members of their families.
The position of farm agent was cre-
ated by the board of supervisors at
their last meeting and the person
filling it will receive $1,000 in addi-
tion to a salary of $1,800 allowed by
the government. The work of the
farm agent will be to secure labor
for certain sections of the country
when it is, needed, to secure good
seed, to control diseases in animals

and plants, to improve stock, and to-
produce good markets for produce
raised in the county.
The city beautifying committee of
the civicyassociation has announced
that the time for taking new orders
for shrubs and trees is almost up. Ov-
er 3,000 shrubs and trees were sold
and planted in the work of beautify-
ing the city this fall.
Red Cross Workers Establish Record
The war bread menu is as follows:
one day was established by Red Cross
A record of 800 surgical dressings fir
house yesterday. The space now em-
ployed for the making of dressings is
becoming overcrowded and the second
floor of the Angell house will be
thrown open to accommodate the rush
of volunteers
Read the Daily advertisements.
They will lead you to the best of Ann
Arbor's storts.-Adv.
Officers' Uniforms and. accessories.
G. H. Wild & Co., State Street.-Adv.

TODAY
4:15 o'clock-Twilight recital in
Hill auditorium.
7 o'clock-Round-Up club meets at
Michigan Union.
7 o'clock-University Zionist socie-
ty meets in room P-162 Natural Sci-
ence building.
7:30 o'clock-Christian Science lec-
ture in University hall.
7:30 o'clock-Actuarial and Statis-
tical society meets in room 401 Mason
hall.
TOMORROW
7:30 o'clock-Alpha Nu debating
society meets in Alpha Nu rooms, Uni-
versity hall.
7:30 o'clock-Dr. Balme, of China,
speaks in Lane hall.
U-NOTICES
..Tryouts for flutist will be held at
the Varsity Mandolin club practice at
7 o'clock tonight in University hall
auditorium.
CAMP CUSTER MEN TO HAVE
FEROCIOUS BAYONET DRILL
Invoices Received for Fencing Musk-
ets, Masks, Plastrons, and Other
Equipment
Camp Custer, Oct. 31.- Ferocious
bayonet duels are going to be the next
sport in Camp Custer, and if the men
take to them as they have taken to.
every other branch of the game they
are going to be worth watching.
Invoices for fencing muskets, masks,
plastrons and other equipment for
bayonet fencing have been received.
and as rapidly as they arrive they
will be issued to the companies so
that the men can try out the lessons
that they have learned against dummy
and shadow opponents.I
This bayonet fencing is the exer-
cise that will sae many an Amer-
ican life in Europe. In fact, all the
men wll be equipped with cumber-
some armor, but as they grow ex-
pert many commanders intend to set
the men at it with no other protec-
tion than pads at the ends of the
blunt bayonet.
Hold First Muster
Even a jab with a pad hurts, not
much, but enough not to be caught
much, but enough to make a man
anxious not to be caught twice the
same way. In this way, each will
energetically learn how to defend him-
self and try to get the other fellow
first, against the time when the bay-
onets will be sharp and a German at
the other end of the piece.
UNCLE SAM PUBLISHES SONG
BOOK; TO RETAIL AT 25 CENTS
Washington, Oct. 31.- Uncle Sam
published his first official song book
and placed it on the market today.
On the cover are inscribed his initials,
"U. S. A.," and the book is entitled
"Songs of the Soldiers and Sailors."
It is issued by the committees on
training camp activities of the army
and navy departments and will sell on
the book stands for 25 cents. To those
in the service it will be sold at cost-
15 cents.
The book contains 69 songs, in-
cluding all the American patriotic and
battle airs, the Hawaiian Hults, and
the sacred songs usually sung in chor-
uses. An appendix has 80 other songs.
There are now 19 chorus instruc-
tors in the army and six in the navy.

A-l
SM WOOD
SH AS THE NEW
LAPEL FRONT
EARL &wllu04 Hi r
TRO-y'S BE$T PR OCUCr
STUDENTS' DIRECTORY WILL
BE PLACED ON SALE FRIDAY
Price Remains 50 Cents; Map of Ann
Arbor Feature of 1917.18
Edition
The 1917-18 Students' Directory will
go on sale Friday morning. The book
is bound in brownish red cloth and
contains 288 pages. In spite of in-
crease in cost of materials and the
limited edition, the price remains 50
cents.
The book supplies a faculty direc-
tory, a list of phones by streets, an al-
phabetical list of the students of the
University, of the School of Music,
and of the Michigan State Normal
college, giving their name, depart-
ment, class, street address, home city,
and telephone number. The person-
nel of fraternities, sororities, house
clubs, and dormitories of the Univer-
sity, and officers of student organiza-
tions are also included. A new fea-
ture of the Directory is a completely
keyed map of Ann Arbor.
Camp Custer Boys Will Have Books
Camp Custer, Mich., Oct. 31-Ada-
ma Strohm, librarian of Detroit, met
with a number of state librarians
in Battle Creek, Tuesday. The plans
for providing the soldiers with library
privileges and supplying books for
camp reading were outlined.
The library work of the camps will
include the providing of books for
self-culture and books for recreation.
Some response has already come to
the appeal for books sent out by the
library committee. Larger donations
of books are expected when the work
is more completely organized and be-
comes better known.
Lithograph Works To Be Displayed
Washington, Oct. 31.-A series of
50 lithograph works of the war made
in America will be placed on exhibi-
tion in the national museum here.
Similar sets will be shown in the De-
troit Art Museum.
i.

Satisfaction

NICKELS
ARCADE

IN DETROIT
101 Washington Blvd.

ATHLETIC ASSISTANTS PICKED
FOR COMPANIES BY DR. MAY
Athletic assistants for next week in
the different' military companies were
appointed yesterday by Dr. George A.
May, physical director of Waterman
gymnasium.
The assistant athletic instructors
are as follows: 60-yard dash, Swift,
Co. I, first regiment, and Windes, Co.
A, second regiment; broad jump,
Beardsley, Co. K, first regiment, and
Pear, Co. B, second~ regiment; shot put,
Vicks, Co. M, first regiment, and Lau-
rie, Co. D, second regiment; relaxed
running, Kemp, Co. L, first regiment,
and Duffie, Co. C, second regiment.
Big Seat Sale For Game With Soldiers
Cincinnati, Oct. 311-The seat sale
for the benefit football game between
the soldiers' team of Camp Sherman
and the University of Cincinnati at
Redland field, Nov. 17, had reached
$44,250 today. Seventy-three boxes
were auctioneered off for a total of
$34,250, and $10,000 worth of single
tickets have been sold. The first box
sold was to Joe Mangus for $1,100.
Public Hair Brushes Barred
New Orleans, Oct. 31.-Public use
of hair bruhses in Louisiana after
March 1 is prohibited under an
amendment to the sanitary code.

as defined by us,
is not the culmina-
tion of a sale, but
the eventual regard
that sale develops
in your mind to-
wards us.

SHOES
for
MEN and
WOMEN

I"

I

AlfredJ.Ruby
I INCORPORATED

_
.. .

1

LYNDON, Photographer
719 N. University Ave.

Sale of

Ann Arbor's Largest Dealer in

b

Curtains and Curtain
Material'

Eastman Kodaks and Films Amateur Finishing
is our Praticular Business and we make it our
Particular Business ,to get the Kind of Results
that make you our Permanent Customer

To Reduce Stock

Marquisette Curtains, $2.75 to
$3.50 values, at $2.35 per pair.
$4.25 to $4.75 values, at $3.15.
Scrims, 90c to $1.25 values, at 79c.
Voile Curtains, $3.75 to $4.50 val-
ues, at $2.95.

Nottingham Lace Curtains, $1.85
to"$2.25 values, at $1.25.
$3.75 to $4.75 values, at $2.45.
Fine Brussels Net Curtains, $4.75
to $6.00 values, at $3.85.
$8.75 to $10.50 values, at $6.85.

MARTIN HALLER

FURNITURE

RUGS

DRAPERIES

MIMI

RfANS OVERRUN
LARGE ITALIAN TERRITORY
(Continued from Page One)
heir attack broke our left wing
;he Julian front.' .
hils was issued Sunday and sums
fficially the sequel to the tremend-
concentration of Austro-German
es detailed in earlier dispatches
before the critical juncture was
hed and all telegraphing was stop-
Offensive Tremendous
he magnitude of the surprise of-
dve was heightened by the choice
L place where' comparatively no
ing had occured.gHad the enemy
ien any of the fighting fronts near
zia or Bainsizza plateau, they
Ld have faced a splendidly organ-
force, but in "sneaking through
back door." as an officer described

who takes a family unawares and is
able for a time to terrorize those
taken in an unsuspecting moment."
As previously cabled, late Friday
night the crossing of the Izonso near
Tolimna was carried out. The enemy
forces then found themselves facing a
range of low mountains with the Ital-
ian army master of the passes leading
to the eastern region of Venetia.
General Cadorna's bulletin must be
accepted for the moment as all that
can be stated of what occured on the
Italian left wing.
Scandinavian Ships Being Held
Buenos Aires, Oct. 31.-Many Scan-
dinavian ships are being detained in
port here as 'sailing is impossible,
due to lack of permits from the allies.
Many cargoes are consigned to black-
listed firms.

Mechanics Threaten To Strike
Boston, Oct. 31.-Mechanics employ-
ed in government and private ship-
building yards in Boston, Providence,
Quincy, and other sections of New
England, as well as the Watertown ar-
senal, have threatened a strike unless
Newton D. Baker, secretary of war,
takes immediate steps to establish a
closed shop. Mr. Baker agreed to
send a representative here, but he
has failed to arrive.
Vaccine Contains Tetanus Germs
St. Paul, Minn., Oct. 31.-Health
officers have been asked by manufact-
urers of vaccine sent here for vaccin-
ating against smallpox to return it
as it had been found to contain tetanus
germs. The vaccine was shipped to
Washington, where it will be analyz-
ed. It was suggested that enemies of
the country might be responsible.
Japan Receives New- U. S. Ambassador
Tokio, Oct. 31.-Roland S. Morris,
of Philadelphia, has presented his
credentials as American ambassador,
succeeding the late George W. Guht-
lie. The emperor, had an audience of
the entire American embassy staff in
Phoenix hall. Later the empress gave
a reception to the ladles of the embas-
sy staff.
You will find what you want
through the Daily want ads.-Adv.
while you wait.-Adv.

ARNOLD AND COMPANY
JEWELERS
220 S. MAIN ST.

WE SUPPLY EVERY STUDENTS' NEED

Sheehan & Coo1
Ann Arbor Detroit j

Text-Books and Supples
For all Courses

advise you to take your Watch and Jewelry Repairs to the best jewelry
store in the city.
Our Repair Department is arranged to give you the best service
and at the moderate charges consistent with high grade work.
Incidentally look around our store aid be convinced of the Superi-
ority of our Stock of Watches, Diamonds and Jewelry.

ARNOLD AND COMPANY
JEWELERS
220 S. MAIN ST.

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