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October 31, 1917 - Image 4

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1917-10-31

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

THE MICHIGAN DAILY WEDNESDAY,

__ _

OF OERSEAS
LLERS ARE SAFE

T 2,700 KILLED BY HUNS IN
TOTAL. OF 13,000,000, SAYS
LLOYD GEORGE"
X the 13,000,000 men who have
ssed the Atlantic ocean to the
hting zones during the three
%rs of the war only 2,700 have
en killed by enemy actions, ac-
ding to Premier Lloyd George in a
aech before the house of commons,
which he lauded the work of the
ry.
n telling of the good work of the
vy and the important part it plays
the war, Lloyd George said, "The
vy is the anchor of the allied
ise; if it loses its grip, the hopes
the alliance are shattered. The
vy has safeguarded the transporta-
u of 25,000,000 tons of explosives
d 51,000,000 tons of coal.
Field Marshal Haig and General
ude, British commander in chief
the Mesopototamian forces, were
rmly praised by the premier for
ir work. The Dominion forces re-
'ved hearty praise for their services
ring the war.
Seats at the meeting were reserved
the distinguished strangers' gal-
y for visiting American congress-
n, who had been invited to attend.
;OLDIERS NEED SWEATERS
iwhtenaw County Red Cross Has
pent $2,800 on Yarn; Wants More
rhe Washtenaw county Red Cross
nmittee has announced the receipt
a letter from the,. national head-
arters requesting that knitting for
boys at the front be continued. The
nmunication states that the demand
sweaters and other knitted goods
far greater than the supply.
the committee reported over $2,800
nt on yarn since the opening of the
npaign, but that shortage in funds
.y cause the discontinuance of knit-
g.
Ln exhibit of prize farm produce,
pplied by the farmers of the neigh-
ing townships, will be held here
a few weeks, the proceeds giong to
Red Cross.

DISPOSAL OF APPLE SURPLUS
CONFRONTS CONTINENT GROWERS
Australia Offers 50,000,000 Pounds of
Jam and 8,500,000 Apples to
World Markets
Melbourne, Australia, Oct. 30.-
Australia has a surplus of apples to
offer the world's market in competi-
tion with the American fruit.
How to dispose of it is one of the
probemstconfronting the government.
At the request of fruit growers, Prime
Minister William M. Hughes has an-
nounced that American apples may
be imported in Australia only during
November and December.
Australian fruit growers are relying
upon the far eastern markets to ab-
sorb the apple surplus but have been
somewhat discouraged by the informa-
tion that the United States authori-
ties also are inquiring whether or not
the far east cannot be made a market
for America.
The surplus of fruit in Australia is
due largely to the lack of shipping
facilities.
Australia has about 50,004,000
pounds of jam, and 8,500,000 of evap-
orated apples to offer to the rest of the
world. The British government has
agreed to take 12,000,000 pounds of
jam in the first quarter of 1918. The
Australian authorities are urging the
British government either to accept
the whole 50,000,000 or to offer to the
United States what Britain does not
want or cannot take for its own use.
New Reading Room For Library
The reading room in the new Li-
brary will be located in the front
wing of the second floor.
Students wishing to do their study-
ing in the Library will use either this
room or the present study room on the
second floor of the East wing. The
reference room on the first floor will
be reserved for those who are using
Library books.
Will Give Last Hygiene Talk Tonight
Dr. A. S. Warthin's last lecture on
"Sex Hygiene" to the freshmen who
'are 'not taking military training will
be given at 7:30 o'clock tonight in
West Medical amphitheater. Tickets
for this lecture can be obtained today
at Lane hall free of charge. No one
will be admitted to this lecture with-
out- a ticket.

CUSTER MEN OPEN
"Y FUND DRIVE
$1,500,000 for Military Association
Work in Camps Asked by State
Committee
Officers and privates of Camp Cus-
ter will lend their efforts in a cam-
paign which opens this week to se-
cure $1,500,000 for military Y. M. C. A.
work in the state. Major-General
Dickman has expressed his approval
of the plan, and sanctioned the propos-
ition of sending the privates to all
parts of the state to speak.
Mr. A. L. Parker, camp secretary
of the Y. M. C. A., will begin the drive
at Grand Rapids and Saginaw.
Soliciting funds will take place
sometime early next month. The need
of more huts in Camp Custer to car-
ry on the service of the association is
imperative, according to the officers.
About one-third of the 15,000 sold-
iers in camp attend the Y. M. C. A.
Sunday services and an equal number
are to be found at the masses of the
Knights of Columbus. Nearly 2,500
are away from the camp on leave and
an additional 2,500 do not attend
church on Sunday.
Heat and light are furnished to the
Y. M. C. A. for its buildings, by the
government, free of charge. Most of
the structures were erected at a total
cost of $80,000. The running expenses
and salaries of the workers are con-
siderable, and it is for this reason that
the association has launched the cam-
paign for more support to better
maintain these soldiers' club rooms,
and to build more.
Plans for the University's part
in the soldiers camp fund are
being made and will be announced
later, according to a statement issued
by one of the committee members.
Collect Smokes for Camp Custer
All students are urged to contribute
smokes and books for the men at
Camp Custer.
Barrels are to be placed at various
places about the city and all contribu-
tions wil be received by the Sammies.
Come on. Do your bit, and help
make this consignment a heavy one.
Carrying guns for protection against
sluggers is the latest fad of girls at
the University of Illinois..

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AT THE THEATERS

YOU CAN GO TO-

* "Johnny Get Your Gun," at the
* Garrick, Detroit.
s

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TODAY

Whitney-"Peggy O'Moore.".
Majestic-Vaudeville.

* Orpheum-Montague Love
* "The Brand of Satan."
* ____

in *
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Wuerth--Taylor Holmes in "Ef-
ficiency Edgar's Courtship." Also
Comedy, "Day and Night."
Rae-Nance O'Neil in "His Wed-
ding Night." Also "Fatty" Ar-
buckle in "The Final Payment."
Arcade-Yale Boss and Paul
Kelly in "Knights of the Square
Table."

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* * C * * * * * * s" * *
AT THE MAJESTIC
"Happy" Lou Whitney in "Peggy
O'Moore," the pretty little Irish girl,
reminds one of the famous "Peg O'
My Heart." There is an abundance
of good comedy running throughout
the entire play and every member of
the company is admirably cast. This
is also a play that appeals to the
patriotism of every American.
U. S. GOVERNMENT WVILL
FEED CAPTIVE SAMMIES
Supplies Already Being Sent To Ger-
man Camps Through the
Red Cross
The United States government is
preparing to care for all American
soldiers and sailors who may be taken
prisoners.
As Germany provides neither suffi-
cient food nor clothing for her prison-
ers-of-war this country is planning to
care for her own men in German
camps. Seventy-five tons of food
have already been sent to the 100
American soldiers now in German
camps through the Red Cross ware-
house in Berne, Switzerland.
The money which has been appro-
priated for this cause is not spent at
a rate which will exhaust the sum by
next summer, but is being conserved
for future use so that the soldiers
may receive the maximum benefit
from it.
CUSTER MEN JOIN MOVEMENT
TO CONSERVE FOODSTUFFS

CITY NEWS
"Good roads for Washtenaw County"
is the subject under discussion at the
board of supervisors meeting that isf
now being held. It is proposed to
raise more than $20,000 by means of
a two and one-half mill tax, whichf
has been characterized by some of the
supervisors as too exorbitant.f
After the completion of the Octoberf
session, the board will adjourn to
Tuesday, Jan. 8, 1918. The matter of
the good roads project will then be
taken up again.
At the annual meeting of the board
of directors of the Ann Arbor Red
Cross chapter held Monday afternoon
in Lane hall the following officers
were elected for the coming year:
Chairman, Dr L. P, Hall; vice-chair-
man, Dr. Warren P. Lombard; treas-
urer, Mr. Carl F. Braun; secretary,
Miss Winona M. Saunders. All but
the vice-chairman formerly held these
offices.
Mrs. I. B. Loree, Mrs. W. J. Hus-
sey, and Mrs. F. C. Newcombe were
elected directors to fill the positions
made vacant by the absence fo Dr.
Victor C. Vaughan, and Dr. Reuben
Peterson and by the resignation of
Mr. Shirley W. Smith.
A judgment of $1,350.12 was rendered
by Circuit Court Judge Kinne yester-
day to Fannie Luellen and Gladys Den-
mark, plaintiffs in a suit against the
New York Life Insurance company.
The case resulted from an attempted
collection from the insurance com-
pany.
The latest tyhoid fever victim is
Miss Christine Fischer of 719 West
Jefferson street, who is said to have
contracted the disease during a visit
in New York City. Dr. Wessinger,
health officer, says that the epidemic
which began about Oct. 19, is now
well under control.
EIGHTEEN NATIONS FIGHTING
FOUR CENTRAL EMPIRES
Three-Fourths of World's Population
Is Allied Against Teu-
tons

Pop.Mat.Wd.
Best Seats $1
Sat. Mat.
25c to $1.50

U~Afflll~fWk. Oct. 29
Nights
50C to $2.00

JOHN CORT'S LAUGH INC HIT
"JOHNNY GET YOUR GUN"
with LOUIS BENNISON and original N.Y.ast
Rae Theatre
TODAY-Roscoe (Fatty) Ar-
buckle-"His Wedding Night."I
Also Fox Production, "The
Final Payment."

STUDENTS' DIRECTORY LISTS
4,863 STUDENTS IN COLLEGE
Four thousand eight hundred and
sixty three students, as well as the
entire faculty of the University and
the students and faculty of the Normal
college at Ypsilanti, are listed in the
new Students' Directory, which will
appear on the campus within a few
days.
The book will be bound in rose-tint-
ed cloth, and will sell at the old price
of 50 cents per copy.

ARCA D E
Wed-3i-Yale Boss and Paul Kelly in
Knights of the Square Table" (Un-
der auspices of Boy Scouts).

225 E. Liberty.

Phone 1321

GOODNEW FLORAL CO.

Flowers
Plants
Ferns

Baskets
Corsages
DeoratIons

N riMW

Soldiers Who Disobey Rules Will
Demoted and Punished With-
out Mercy

Be

ADLER:RCQITESTER Clothes

Soldiers of the national army at
Camp Custer have joined the great
national movement for food conser-
vation introduced by Food Administra-
tor Hoover. Strict enforcement of a
plan to reduce the waste of foods is
being introduced into the Michigan
camp.
Those men who are caught not
obeying the instructions of army of-
ficials to save foods will be lowered
in rank and receive punishemnt for
their offences. This strict ruling was
brought about after a rumor had been
spread that troops had been wasting
food. Civilians of Battle Creek have
also undertaken the task of food con-
servation.
ADVISORY BOARD OF WOMEN'S
LEAGUE WELCOMES MEMBERS
Seventy representatives of the
league houses of the University met
with the advisory board of the Wom-
an's League at a supper held last
night in Barbour gymnasium. The
meeting, which was the first of the
year, was held for the purpose of
enabling the members of the board
to become acquainted with the league
house of representatives who were
elected by the houses at the opening
of the school year.
Mrs. Arthur G. ,Hall is chairman of
the board. In the receiving line were
Mrs. Harry B. Hutchins, Dean Myra
B. Jordan, Mrs. William J. Husey, Mrs.
W. D. Henderson, Mrs. R. W. Cowden,
Mrs. William A. Frayer, Mrs. A. S.
Whitney, Mrs. Henry Adams, Mrs.
Junius E. Beal, Mrs. Gertrude W.
Slocomb of Chicago, and Miss Agnes
Wells of Newberry residence.

Washington, Oct. 30.-'More than
three-f ourths of the world's popula
Lion lives in the countries at wvar wit
Germany or her allies, according to
eompilations from government sourc-
es.
The persons living within the cen-
tral countries are outnumbered more
than seven times by anti-Germanic
populations, and the proprtion is
swelled even higher if consideration is
taken of the populations of the 10.
countries which have broken relations
with the central powers. Germany's
enemies now include nearly all the
white and yellow races, and the phys-
ical resources of about half the world's
area are mobilized against the forces
of Germany, Austria-Hungary, Bul-
garia and Turkey.
It is pointed out that, of the world's
total population of 1,691,000,000 about
1,342,000,000 live under the flags of
the central powers' open enemies in
the war. About 40,000,000 inhabit the
countries which have broken relations,
and 132,000,000 are neutral, while the
population of Germany and her allies
are about 177,000,000.
Of the world's total area of 57,000,-
000 square miles, 27,000,000 are under
anti-German domination, while the
Germanic allies control only 5,000,000.
State department records show the
following nations at war with Ger-
many or her allies: United States,
Great Britian, France, Russia, Serbia,
Japan, Belgium, Italy, Portugal, Ru-
mania, Greece, Montonegro, San Mar-
ino, China, Cuba, Panama, Siam and
Liberia.

MJES TIC
EVE. 7:30-9. 20,, 25o 0O
MAT. 3 P.M. 1Oo, anid20o
3 Days Com. Mon.
PHIL E" ADAMS
AND HIS
"Facinating Flirts"
with
Jack Walsh & Co. of Clever
and Pretty Girls
Lillian Morley and
MoCarthy Sisters
The "Three" Misses
Weston
Delton, Mereena
and Delton
Lou Hoffman
3 Days Corn Thur.
MELODY SIX
-4- OTHER ACTS -40
Specia Children's
Matinee
Saturday, Nov. 3
Bring the Kiddies to meet Karl
On and after Nov. zst this Theatre is
required by taw to collect a United
States Tax of xo% on all admissions.
Wuerth Theatre
BOOKINGS FOR OCTOBER
Prices: is Cents
Matinees 2, 3:30. Nights 6:30, 8, 9:30
Saturdays-Sundays-Continuous
Tues-Wed-3o-3zi-Taylor Holmes in "gffl..
ciency Edgar's Courtship." Also a;
Reel Comedy, "Day and Night."
NOVEMBER
Thur-Fri---Wallace Reid in "The Hos-
tage." Also Keystone Comedy.
Sat.-3-Florence LaBadie in "War and
.,the Woman." Also Serial, "Neglect-.
ed Wife," No. 9.
OrpheumTheatre
BOOKINGS FOR OCTOBER
Prices: zoc unless otherwise specified
Matinees 2, 3:3o. Nights 6:30. 8, 9:30
Saturdays-Sundays...Continuous
Wed-z-Montae Love in "The Brand,
of Satin." Weekly and" Comedy.
NOVEMBER
Thur-i-Bessie Love in "A Little Re-
former." Also Triangle Comedy and
Ford Weekly.
Fri-a-Winifred Allen in "The Hauntedj
House." Also Triangle Comedy and-
Ford 'Weekly.
"Sat-3-Marjorie Ramean in "ohr

We Dress the Successful Man
Possibly the one great reason of this, is that Adler-Rochester Clothes
typify the modern idea of looking well without apparent effort.
Among those who give too little or too much thought to their dress, the
distinguishing thing to do is to give just thought enough.
That's all a man does who buys Adler-Rochester Clothes.
The man of slipshod clothes habits never occupies a chair at the directors'
table.
Success ties up with success, and if you are sucecssful we can surely in-
terest you as we have many others.

WHITNEY
THEATRE
Happy Lou Whitney Co.
Sun., Mon., Tues., Wed.
PEGGY 0' MOOR E
Big Irish Play-Teeming
with patriotism
A Distinct Novelty - The Play of the Hour
Thur., Fri., Sat.,
WHY GIRLS HOME
The Play that started the nation-
wide Vice Crusade
MOTHERS-BRING FATHERS-BRING
YOUR DAUGHTERS YOUR SONS;
Prices: Eve. 1-20-25c
Pop. Mats,-WED.-SAT.
REMEMBER
0C Happy Lou ed.
Reception Wed, M

I

Lutz Clothing Store

Buy -your alarm clocks at
Chapman's, Jeweler. 113 8S.
--Ad.

J. L
Main.

217 South Main Street

Officers' Uniforms and accessories.
G. H. Wild & Co., State Street.--Adv.
Total enlistments of the Australian
forces aggregate 306,000.

St

ual Travel and Cot
arguerite Clark
." Also Holmes Tr

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