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October 25, 1917 - Image 1

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Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1917-10-25

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E CAU

OF DEMOCRACY BY BUYING A LIBERTY

15JJN LI

FHE WEATHER
COLDER; PROBABLE
RAIN TODAY

BkAh

:43 ttli

ASSOCIATED
PRESS
DAY AND NIGHT WIRE
. SERVICE

XXVIII. No. 21.

ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN, THURSDAY, OCTOBER 25, 1917.

PRICE THREE CE]

_-
1 f

NWERSTITY :US
SUBCRBEMORE
TO ATTAIN QUOTA
AOTMENT NOT REACHED AT
END OF DRIVE YES-
TERDAY
OMMITTEE PLANS FINAL
FFORT TO PUSH ACROSS
udent Subscriptions Fail to Equal
Past Daily Average; $7,800
is Pledged
* * * * * * * * * * * *
UNIVERSITY LIBERTY LOAN *
TOTALS LATE LAST *
NIGHT *
*
Phi Kappa Psi ............$5,550 *

* Delta Gamma ....... ..
* Zeta Beta Tau...........
* Senior Engineers........
* Trigon................
* Beta Theta Pi..........
* Chinese club.............
* Campus tent.... .......
* Alpha Delta Phi..... ..
* Theta Delta Chi..... . .
* Student subscriptions'

5,400
4,000
3,600
3,200
2,850
2,550
2,550
2,500
2,200

*
*
*
*
*

to date...............$ 80,000
Faculty reoprted to date.114,00
Student subscriptions
yesterday-.......... 7,300
University total to date..194,000
* * * * * * *

(3y Herbert G. Wilson)
The University's Liberty loan did
not go "over the top" last night to its
$200,000 victory, as anticipated by the
committee.
More thousands of dollars are need-
ed to complete the quota which it is
hoped can be raised before the cam-
paign closes Friday.
The student subscriptions fell below
the average daily purchase of bonds
yesterday, only $7,300 being obtained.
No report from the faculty had
been received late last night, so their
total remains the same, $114,000. Stu-
dent subscriptions to date are $80,000,
not half of the University's quota.
Short of Expectations
"Perhaps the parade will have an
enliving effect on the campaign," de-
clared one member of the loan "com-
mittee when asked if he thought the
University goal would be subscribed.
"We surely expected the quota would
have been reached and oversubscribed
Wednesday night, anyway. But we'll
have to dig in and swing it Thursday,
or the other colleges and universities
in the country are going to think we
haven't got the Old time Michigan
punch."
The total for the University is now
$194,000.
The campus tent has changed hands
and is now being managed-by the Phi
Gamma Delta fraternity.
"The management of the .campus
tent by the Trigon's is all that could
be desired,' 'said Mr. Francis Bacon,
'02, in commenting upon the campaign
"I believe that we can get our quota
if the students will get behind the is-
sue and not let Michigan fall short.
We can't tell whether we will win or
not 'until ge get all the figures."
It was thought at one time that the
purchase of the Regents could be add-
ed to the general University total, but
the possiblity is remote, according to
members of the committee.
"Michigan mpst win her victory in
this loan," is the slogan adopted by
the campaigners in a last determined
two days' effort to raise the quota.
Closes Saturday Noon
All solicitors and organization can-
vassers must turd in their reports to
the University loan committee before
Saturday noon, is the order issued by
Mr. Francis Bacon, '02, executive man-
ager of the drive.
Many interesting incidents are being
told by the members of the local com-
mittee of sacrifices that are being
made in the purchase of bonds. One
of the committeemen tells of having
approached A. C. Graig, a poor man
living in a tent on Thayerastreet. Mr.
Craig surprised the solicitor by of-

WOMEN NAMED TO
MANAGE INLANDER
Marion Holden, '18 Chosen Managing
Editor and Blanche Lane, '18,
Business Manager.
Marion Holden, '18, was yesterday
named managing editor of the Inland-
er for the school year by the Board
in Control of Students' Publications.
Blanche Lane, '18, was appointed bus-
mness manager.
Due to its late start, the manage-
ment is desirous of getting its staff
together in order that plans for a No-
vember issue may be formulated as
soon as posible.
Manuscripts should be addressed to
the managing editor at the Press
building, with a stamped, self address-
ed envelope enclosed.
TO BRAKBCKBONE Of
PRESENT SUGARHFMINE
REFINING COMPANY BUYS UP BIG
SUPPLY FOR SHIPMENT
SOUTHWARD.
Washington, October 24.-Two hun-
dred million pounds of Louisiana cane
sugar was contracted for here today
by the American Sugar Refining Co.,
and will begin to move northward next
week to relieve the serious shortage
of the eastern states. For the two
hundred million pounds, the refiners
paid about eighteen million dollars, or
about 6 1-2 cents a poun. After ad-
ding cost of transportation and refin-
ing, it is estimated that they will be
able to sell to the wholesaler at
steadily, reducing prices beginning at
8.35 cents, eastern seaboard, and drop-
ping to 7.25 cents by the end of the
year. This, it was said, should mean
a price of 9 cents to the consumer at
once, and not more than 8 cents by
the pnd of the year.
With the wholesale market virtually
out of the way, the administration now
is turning its attention to retailers and
is preparing to cut off the supplies of
those who insist on taking war pro-
flits.
ALUMNI MAY ISSUE DIRECTORY
OF MICHIGAN MEN IN SERVICE.
Blanks were enclosed in the current
isue of the Michigan Alumnus, to get
information concerning Michigan men
in service. It is desired that the
names of as many graduates and for-
mer students as possible be turned in,
with their classes, service, rank, and
present address. This information
will be published in The Alumnus as
fast as it is received. The Alumni as-
sociation is hoping to incorporate this
material in a directory of Michigan
men in the service of t ehruogk
men in the service of their country.
Increase in loss of British Vessels.
London, Oct. 24.-An increase in the
loss of British merchantmen through
mines or submarines is noted in the
Adimarity report for the past week.
Seventeen vessels of more than 1,600
tons and 8 under 1,600 tons were sunk.
In the previous week, 12 British mer-
chant, vessels of more than 1,600 tons,
6 under that tonnage, and one fishing
vessel were sunk.-

Princeton Sbscribes Heavily to Bonds
Princeton, N. J., Oct. 24-An-
nouncement at a student mass meet-
ing tonight' that Princeton Univer-
sity today had subscribed to $100,000
worth of Liberty Bonds resulted in a
flood of subscriptions from the stu-
dents. Nearly $300,000 were subscrib-
ed at the meeting which was address-
ed by William H. Edwards of New
York.

US.TO RELIEVE
COALSITUATI ON
Devote Entire Production of Mines On
Qct. 29 To Needs of Ohio and
Michigan.
PLAN TO BE FOLLOWED IN
OTHER STATES NEEDING COAL.
Dealers Required To Sell Consumers
Day's Output In One
Ton Lots.
Washington, Oct. 24.-The govern-
ment will suspend its priority order
on shipment plans on Monday, Oct.
29, in order to devote the entire pro-
duction of the Ohio, western Pennsyl-
vania, and Michigan, bituminous
mines for that day to the emergency
needs of the domestic consumers of
Ohio and Michigan, the fuel adminis-
trator announced today. This plan
of devoting one day's production to the
needs of a particular section will be
followed in other cases.
Fuel Administrator Garfield confer-
ed with State Administrator Johnson,
of Ohio, who later announced that
plans had been worked out under
which the Ohio and Michigan dealers
would be required to sell the day's out-
put to consumers in one ton lots.
Every effort will be made to procure
an adequate car supply for the day.
Mr. Garfield said he would assure
all localities that they will receive
coal to meet their needs, and that each
section will be considered in the light
of the special circumstances affecting
it. He said the entire car supply avail-
able wil be employed to move the coal
traffic from Ohio, Michigan and wes-
tern Pennsylvania to the dealers of
the first two states on the day set
aside.
Local organizations already have
been affected by the fuel administra-
tor, under which the -planwill be car-
ried out in Ohio and other states.
FRATERNITIES JOIN
IN CARLOAD BUYING
Sponsors Declare it is Not Akempt to
Boycott Ann Arbor Mer-
chants
Charging that loct* ders are ask-
ing unreasonable prices tor foodstuffs,
several fraternities have banded to-
gether to carry on co-operative buy-
ing from outside firms.
Harry F. Becker, '19M, who has been
instrumental in starting the move-
ment, states that it is not intended to
declare a permanent boycott against
Ann Arbor dealers. As soon as the
present prices are lowered to con-
form with what the organizations think
will give a legitimate profit to the
merchants, it will disband, as home
trading is preferred.
Two carloads of potatoes have been
ordered and are expected to arrive
in a few days, with more coming in
the course of a month. The purchase
of other staples is contemplated. Par-
ticipation in the distribution of these
commodities is not confined to the
particular fraternities which have al-
ready joined, but is open to all or-
ganizations on the campus.
In 1911, at the University of Illinois,
Mr. Becker took an active part in a
similar attempt to force down prices
which resulted in the accomplishment
of the object.

Lecture Is Given On Red Cross Work.
Mrs. V. C. Vaughan, Jr., of Detroit,
spoke on Red Cross work at the Ann
Arobor Y. M. C. A. Wednesday even-
ing. She spoke first of the Red Cross
organization, then of the surgical dres-
sing work. Particular emphasis was
laid on cleanliness and co-operation
in the work. After the meeting a prac-
tical lesson in bandage folding was
given.

SUBSCRIPTION TORRENT
SWEEPS LOAN FORWARD
INDICATIONS POINT TO BIG TOTAL
BUT REPORTS ARE
MEAGER
Washington, Oct. 24. -Torrent of
Liberty Day subscriptions has swept
the Liberty loan nearer its goal by
hundreds of millions of dollars.
How far forward the hugh total has
been carried by this, the banner day's
activities, no one could tell tonight.
Indications, based on meager and scat-
tering returns, were that it had reach-
ed far past the three billion minimum
but still lacks approximately two bil-
lion of the maximum hoped for. This
estimate was made public at 9 o'clock
tonight by the treasury department.
"Indications are that Liberty Day
subscriptions to the second Liberty
loan brought the total for the five bil-
lion dollar drive close to three billion
dollars but there is no official assur-
anec that this mark was passed."
The department estimate was based
upon returns and estimates from most
of the twelve federal reserve districts
filed by wire at 5 o'clock today. At that
hour, however, campaigning still was
in full swing throughout the greater
part of the country, tens of thousands
of persons were standing in line at
banks and there was no reliable guage
by which the outpouring of dollars
could be measured.
The full measure of the nation's
ringing answer to the call for funds
cannot be taken, officials assert, be-
fore next Saturday. There is uan-
imity of opinion that much is to be
done if the five billion dollars is to be
attained. Thoroughly complete re-
turns on transactions up to early aft-
ernoon indicates sales of $2,715,000,000
to date.
Detroit, Oct. 24.-Michigan respond-
ed to President Wilson's proclama-
tion for the observance today of "Lib-
erty Day" with parades in many towns
and cities.
The enthusiasm throughout Michi-
gan, judging by reports received here,
was at such a high pitch that loan
workers were more optomistic than
ever that the state would surely sub-
scribe its quota of 124,000 dollars
when the lists close Saturday night.
The official total for the state tonight,
based on reports from all but three
counties and including a total of $54,-
709,500 announced for Detroit, stood
at $80,075,700.
PROF. WARTHIN WILLA GIVE
HYGIENE TALKS TO FRESHMEN
Prof. A. S. Warthin of the medical
school will talk to freshmen on hy-
giene Oct. 29 and 31. The talks will
be given in the west Physics amphi-
theater at 7:30 o'clock each evening.
All freshmen except those- taking
military drill are expected to be pres-
ent. Tickets may be procured at Lane
hall, beginning Saturday,
Subs Sink Norwegian Steamship.
Christinia, Norway, Oct. 24.-The
Norwegiansteamer Leander has been
sunk by a German submarine accord
ing to an announcement made today by
the foreign office. One man on board
was killed.
The Norwegian steamer Ramfos is
stranded on the Norwegian coast. The

steamer is a total wreck. She had a'
cargo of six thousand tons of corn for
the Belgian Relief Commission.
Camp Davis Men To Banquet At Union
Camp Davis engineers will hold their
annual banquet at 6:15 Friday even-
at the Michigan Union building. Ad-
mittance is exclusively for those who
have attended Camp Davis. A pro-
gram of "stunts" is to be given during
the course of the evening.

REPORT SMALLPOX
IS UNDER CONTROL
New Case of Disease Developed Yes-
terday; Epidemic Not
Feared
Although Mrs. H. M. Heyner, 524
Hill street was sent to the hospital
yesterday morning with a mild case
of small pox, it was reported at the
health office that the disease was well
under control.
Everyone known to have been ex-
posed has been vaccinated, and has
been kept to his home. If the vaccina-
tion has been completed no fear need
be held for an epidemic.
There are only a few cases of typ-
hoid fever in the city, and these are
thought to have been exposed outside
of Ann Arbor. The water is being
watched continually, and if any one
milk supply has been contaminated it
is the general rule that a large number
of people contract the disease almost
simultaneously,, which is not the case
in Ann Arbor.
Varied are Dreams
Of a Cheap J-Hop
Refreshments of Sandwiches Served
with Ice Cream; Dress Suits
Eliminated
Spring always brings castles in the
air but here at Michigan, in spite of
the rain, autumn is prone to producing
pipe dreams. For, all the men are hav-
ing autumnal reveries about a cheap
J-hop house party and many are the
ideas conceived.
First of all, there will not be that
3 to the tailor for a dress suit, nor
will there be the trouble with friend
roommate over borrowing tie, shirt,
and vest, which he had himself plan-
ned on wearing. All friction of this
kind will be eliminated.
Then there will be no trouble over
the taxi for which 'no one has the
money to pay.
But, these are not the constructive
phases of the subject. Consider the
question of food. If the girls could
only bring sandwiches from home and
the men furnish the ice cream, an ec-
onomy party might be given with but
little expense to all.
So go the dreams of the impecunious
Michigan man who has bought a Lib-
erty bond, and those who haven't.
ALL NEBRASKA MEN
WILL GET IN GAME'
Cornhuskers Practice Smashing Yost's
Formations As Presented By
Yearlings.
Detroit, Oct. 24.-A special to the
Free Press from Lincoln, Nebr., reads
as follows:
"The attack of gloom which seized
Nebraska's coaches after Tuesday's
practice and injury toll has spent part
of its force by today and every player
on the squad except Wright and Rib-
bell was in uniform for today's drill.
Shaw and three other regulars were
forbidden to attempt anything more1
strenuous than to jog, but the other
players were driven through a stiff
practice drill in working up now

plays for Yost's Wolverines. Later
the Freshmen and Varsity men lined
up for dummy scrimmages in which
the Yearlings used the Michigan for-
mations. Dr. Stewart believes that
by Saturday, most of his cripples will
be in condition to take part in at least
one part of the game. No less than
18 Nebraskans will be taken along to
Ann Arbor, the party being scheduled
to leave by Thursday afternoon and
arrive in Ann Arbor Friday evening at
::30.

IMMENSE CROWD
MARCHES TO BOO5i
2ND LIBERTY ,LOA
STAND WITH HEADS BARED I]
HONOR OF SOLDIERS IN
FRANCE
UNIVERSITY AND CITY
WELL REPRESENTEI
Varsity Band Heads Procession ai
is Followed by Army Stores
Men
Nearly 8,000 men and women yes
terday afternoon bared their head
to Old Glory, and to honor our boy
"over there," during the Liberty Da;
parade.
When the University chimes struc)
2:30 o'clock, all classrooms emptied
and every store, shop, and factory
Ann Arbor was closed to enable ever;
one to join in the demonstration U
boost the second national loan
Great satisfaction was expressed b;
citizens with the showing made b
students. At 2.30 o'clock sharp the;
began to line up in a column of squad
at the assembling places assigne
them, but for at least a quarter of a
hour before that time, Michigan yell:
could be heard all over the campus
Those in line made sure that no ma
wearing his class insignia, passing thi
lines, failed to fall in.
Varsity Band Leads
The parade began promptly at
o'clock with the band in the lead. In
mediately following the band were thl
army stores students in charge of Prof
J. A. Bursley of the Engineering col
lege.
President Harry B. Hutchins march
ed at the head of the faculty, whic
was well represented. The presiden
and every member of the faculty ear
ried American flags.
The students marched in the orde:
of their classes, the graduates ani
seniors following the faculty, and the
freshmen forming the end of the line
The _seniors were the only ones pos
sessing a women's representation.
Lined up in this manner, the stu
dents and faculty marched down Stat
street and turned onto Huron streel
At Fifth avenue they stopped and wer
joined by the various city organiza
tions and townspeople.
Big Crowd
During the parade, the streets wer
filled with automobiles and the side
walks were crowded with watchers.
Another interesting feature of th
parade was the part taken by th
children. Besides the large represent
ation of the high and ward schoo
there were about a half dozen boys fol
lowing the paraders with their push
mobiles throughout the length of th
line.
Immediately following the fredhme
were the Ann Arbor troops of Bo
Scouts, led by Van's Marine band
Their field stretcher carried on fou
bicycles with a boy on it, attracte
attention.
Many Banners
Many banners bearing the amount
subscribed by groups of individul
and organizations were borne in th

parade. One of these signs read "Rc
tary Club, All Working." Another bor
the inscription, "We Bought $25,00
in Bonds. Employees Motor Product
Company."
At the end of the parade was
United States war tank, carrying gun;
The line of the march was as fol
lows :
Ann street to Main street to WI
liams, thence northward on Diviio
street, east on Huron, proceeding t
State street and, southward on Stat
street turning on Jefferson avenue t
Fifth avenue back to Williams stre(
and, reassembling on the campu
where they disbanded.
Bulletin.
Faris, France, Oct. S4,-The sweet
Ing nature of the French victory ye
terday north of the Aisne is indiclat
by the official announcement from U
war office tonight which reports U
capturing of prisoners exceeding E
000, heavy guns exceeding 70,30 m
throwers and 80 machine guns.

Important Notice on Cornell Game

Coupon No. 8 accompanied by Cornell student application cards must be in Athletic Association offices by 6:00 p. in.,
Saturday, October 27th, to receive consideration in order of classes. After this hour, applications will be filled in order of theirs
receipt. Students unaccompanied by guests should make application for reservations in the cheering sections in the North Stand.
The cheering section should be filled instead of half filled.
Ushers are wanted for the Cornell game. The Athletic Association will pay a, fee of $1.00 to university students ushering
at this game, providing they are able to report at Ferry Field at 4:00 p. m., Friday, November 9th, to receive assignment, ex-
change coupon No. 8 for usher's ticket and report at the gates of Ferry Field at 12:00 Noon on the day of the game.

I

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