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October 23, 1917 - Image 2

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1917-10-23

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

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'.~'A £A~dLJ. ~1LY

MEMBER ASSOCIATED PRESS
e Associated Press is exclusively entitled
te uae for republication of all news dis-
es credited to it or not otherwise credit-
this paper and also the local news
rled Herein.
. i'iuewspaper at the University of
a . Published every morning except
Lay during the university year.
tered at the postoffice at Ann Arbor as
id-lass mtter.
ice: Ann Arbor Press Building. Sub-
bions:. by carrier, 42.so; b mail, $3oo..
Vad stations : Quarry's ; Sudents' up-
tore; The Delta. phones: Business, 960;
inmunications not to exceed 300 words
nth, or notices of events will be pub.
d in The.Daily, at the 'disretion of the
>r if left at the office in the Ann Arbor
a" ldg., or in the notice 'box in the est
i of the general library, where the
are collected at 7:30 o'clock each
r . McDonald..Managng Zditor
klip Emery.........Business Manager
Editor..............Harry M. Carey
Editor...............C. S. Clark, Jr.
: Edito. J....ames Schermerhorn'Jr.
date Editor.........Philip C. Pack
raph Editor............Bruce Millar
raph Editor........Bruce A. Swaney
en's Editor........Mildred C. Mighell
ry EditorM.........argaret H. Cooley
ny "Editor.......Albrt E. Hone, ,Jr.
d Makinson.......Advertising Manager
E. Cholette.......Publication Manager
ard Wohl.........Circulation Manager
li 4' Smith........ ..Credit Manager
M,...............Offce ,Manager
lsworth Robinson..Subsc-rption Manager
NIGHT EDITORS
ert G. Wilson Clarence L. Roeser
Mark K. Ehlbert
REPORTERS
W. Weinerinan T Edgar L. Rice
11 Barnes J. R. McAlpine
R Osius, Jr Paul A. Shinkman
Campbell Vera Brown
ld C. Bromley K. Frances Handibo
Eugene Given
BUSINESS STAF
. Storrer Orville E. Gates
A. Leitzinger Harry D. Hause
H. Baad Lambert Hirsheimer
UESDAY, OCTOBER 23, 1917.
Ight Editor-Herbert G. Wilson
ws staff and tryouts meet in re-
)ral rooms at 12:15 today.
ere is an excellent opening on the
aess staff of The Michigan Daily
four or five sophomores. Men
fug to tryout please report to the
ness manager any day between
) and 11:30 or 1:30 and 2:30.
R JUSTIFICATION FOR BEING
A STUDENT
acticaly every man in the Uni-
ty has some motive or reason
hyn his opinion at least justifies
eturn' to college while the nation
. war. He uses this reason as a
. to his own conscience and also
proof to the public that he is not
cker
>st of the students under draft age
that when their country needs
it will lower the draft age limit.
ents within the draft age believe
by specially fitting themselves for
'e service they will prove a great-
,d to their country than by joining
colors at present. These beliefs
justifiable, and if the student
etly believes them he is doing his
by returning to college.
the other hand the student who
'or the service did so because he
ght that action was clearly his
Each acted according to the
n he caught of his rightful action
e nation's crisis. Although each
uis duty as he saw it, there is
uestion who is sacrificing the
The man who left for the front
be called upon to sacrifice his
for his country while the man
returned to college is sacrificing
ng.
th the government's call for $5,-
)0,000 in the second Liberty loan

issue comes the chance for the
who returned to make his sacri-
No matter how much he gives it
not exceed the sacrifice that his
mate made when he left for the
But if he gives nothing his
n for returning to college will
him nothing. Both in the eyes
ie public and in his own con-
ce he will be branded as a

All communications appearing in the
paper must be sanctioned by the edi-
tor. This does not mean that they
must be in accord with the policy the
editor intends to follow on any given
question.
The communication merely means
that the writer has some ideas which
may well be given campus inspection
and thought. It does not necessarily
mean that communications are always
in accord with Daily ideas or policies
on the subject.
Communications must be signed by
the person writing them as an evi-
dence of good faith. In case the writer
does not wish his name to appear in
print, he may affix any suitable nom de
plume. Many unsigned statements
have so farbbeen handed in and The
Daily has been unjustly censored for
not printing them.
THE WRONG ATTITUDE
A serious speech often gains effect
through a light jest told at the op-
portune moment. But when a state-
ment is of such a nature that it need-
lessly reflects dishonor or even dis-
respect on any individual or group of
individuals, then the story becomes a
very dangerous instrument for achiev-
ing the end in view, and may serve
to jeopardize a very noble purpose.
Those present at the mass meeting
Friday night in Hill auditorium will
recall the story told by Mr. Fenton
with regard to a banquet of a Jewish
charitable organization. The dearth
of applause was indicative of the stu-
dent attitude towards this story. It
showed that Michigan men and women
were in this respect instinctively more
sound than the speaker.
The story to us involved an un-
founded inference. Unfounded, when
weighed in the light of the facts, and
malicious, because the point would
have carried as well without any rac-
ial characterization. If Mr. Fenton is
not acquainted with the true situa-
tion, we feel that it is time that he
looked to the facts. Mr. Fenton is a
man who occupies a . high national
position. He is on the board of the
federal reserve bank of Chicago. More-
over, he is engaged in a highly im-
portant work in connection with the
Liberty loan campaign. For these
reasons it is particularly important
that he knows whereof he insinuates.
These are times when the hetero-
geneous peoples of America must be
welded into one. At the mass meet-
ing we learned of the necessity for a
strong University spirit, which was
described to us as the close union of
all the students for the one cause. A
national spirit may be said to be the
same thing on a much larger scale.
The varied peoples of this country are
responding magnificently to the de-
mands being made upon them, and
especially when working for so im-
portant and worthy a cause as the
Liberty loan, men should most scrupu-
ously avoid the creation of needless
antagonisms, and the introduction of
disintegrating influences into our com-
mon American life.
Now that the Aggies have been dis-
posed of let's get down to studying
and Liberty loaning for a few days.
Some are real men. Others refuse
to sacrifice to buy bonds. .
Saturday night closes the second
campaign. Don't rush in with your
application for a bond at the last min-
ute if you can buy today just as well.

Don't "soldier" on the job at home
while the men in France are doing
your soldiering there.

w1omen
The following league houses have
not yet notified Dean Myra B. Jordan
of their house elections: Brown,
1020 S. University; Christman, 306 N.
State; Delevan, 540 Packard; Pease,
517 Washington; Wheeler, 204 N.
State.
Some of the houses have elected
house heads but no league represent-
atives. This should be done immedi-
ately, as the board of representatives1
meets Saturday. morning, and a full
list of the elected members is neces-
sary in issuing the notification cards.
The dean of women should be notified
as soon as the elections are com-
pleted.
The second list of delinquent houses
is as follows: Adams, 714 E. Univer-
sity; Cannon, 1112 Washtenaw; Col-
lins, 816 Kingsley; Comstock, 407 N.
Ingalls; Episcopal, 517 E. Ann; Fos-
ter, 1331 Washtenaw; Fox, 1222
Washtenaw; Hawkes, 115 Park ter-
race; Jenkins, 504 Jefferson; Kenyon,
632 Church; Mitchell, 745 E. Univer-
sity; Mogk, 119 Park terrace; Parry,
721 Haven avenue; Rash, 625 Forest;
Reed, 801 Huron; Reynolds,- 906
Greenwood; Scott, 200 N. State;
Sweezy, 509 Thompson; Westminster,
602 Huron.
Mortarboard will meet at 7:30
o'clock tonight at the Theta Phi Alpha
house.:
Regular practice of the Girls' Glee
club will be held at 4:30 o'clock this
afternoon in Barbour gymnasium.
Junior hockey practice at 3:30
o'clock this afternoon.
Scenarios for the junior girls' play
must be handed to Emily Powell, '19,
not later than Oct. 30.
Wyvern will meet at 7:30 o'clock
tonight at Newberry residence.
Mrs. Clarice Vaughn of Detroit will
speak at the city Y. W. C. A. at 7:30
o'clock tomorrow night on "Surgical
Dressings and General' Red Cross
Work." All University women are in-
vited.
Lucile Duff, '19, will meet all girls
interested in social service work at
4:30 o'clock this afternoon in Barbour
gymnasium.
Houses are requested to pledge a
certain number of hours of Red Cross
work at the Angell house. Call Jean
Maclennan, '19, phone 627.
SOPHOMORE, PRIZE SELLER
OF UNION MEMBERSHIPS
Final results of the Union's annual
membership campaign have been
summed up.
The team of Richey B. Reavill, '19,
ranked first in the number of mem-
berships sold, with the teams of S. W.
Sedgwick, '19, and H. E. Storz, '19,
standing second and third, respective-
ly. Definite figures will be published
later.
The personnel of Reavill's team is
as follows:
James Pottinger, '20, Robert Buol,
'20, Fred Parsons, '20, Ward Batty, '20,
Irwin Goodwillie, '20, and Charles
Ford, '20.
Pottinger sold more memberships
than any other campaign worker.
Newberry Tea Room Attracts Crowd
Starting four years ago with the
purpose of giving University women
a chance to earn their board by table-
waiting, Newberry tea room now
serves from 50 to 65 girls twice daily.

The word tea room is more or less
of a misnomer, carrying as it does the
suggestion of extremely small and
dainty portions.
The a la carte meals are regular
man sized.
"Every Friday is a meatless day
with us," said Mrs. G. W. Mason, man-
ager, "and as for a wheatless day,
we have two of them every week."
LARGEST DEPOSIT OF SLATE
UNDER PENNSYLVANIA FARM
Pittsburgh, Oct. 23.-What is believ-
ed to be the largest deposit of slate
in America has been discovered 500
feet beneath a Pennsylvania farm.
Homoeopathic Clinic Opens Friday
The Homoeopathic hospital will
open its operative clinic next Friday
morning. Dr. John M. Lee, a member
of the auxiliary clinical staff, will be
in charge.'

WOMEN TO CONSECRATE IDLE
HOURS FOR OUR SOLDIER BOYS
Local House Organizations Commence
War Work at Angell Home
This Week
Women's house organizations are
pledging a certain number of hours
each week to the work at the surgical
dressings headquarters at the Angell
home. Delta Gamma will give 70
hours a week, and Sorosis 60 hours.
Mrs. Dean Loree, who is in charge
of the work, urges that more of the
houses follow their example. The
rooms are open every day, except Sun-
day, from 9 until 5 o'clock. Houses
desiring to pledge a definite number
of hours each week are requested to
notify Jean Maclennan, '19, 'at Martha
Cook dormitory.
The county Red Cross recommend
that each house agree to knit a definite
'number of sets. k set consists of
sweater, muffler, wristlets, and socks.
Systematic schedules of work, pledged
by the different house organizations,
are, in the opinion of the local Red
Cross, better method of accomplishing
the work which has been assigned as
Ann Arbor's quota than individual
volunteering.
"Y" Wants Report on Poor Work
N. D. Ireland, employment secre-
tary of the Y. M. C. A., has requested
that employers of students report
cases of over-charging and poor help.
It is the aim of the employment bu-
reau to send out only dependable and,
efficient help, and to do this it is nec-
essary to secure the co-operation of
the employers. Although the bureau
does not guarantee the help sent out
to be satisfactory in every way, they
are enabled by reports from the em-
ployers to eliminate the names of un-
satisfactory help from their lists.
Recreation makes for Efficiency.
"We try to treat you right." Huston
Bros.-Adv. . tf.

BOO

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NEW AND SECOND HAND
FOR A L L DEPARTMENTS
Engineering Supplies
Drawing Instruments

STAT E WMAIN
ST RE ET HST RE ET
Hard, Water. Soap
For Gym Use
Its the kind of Soap you'll like because It lathers freely
5e per cake
THE EBERACH & SON CO.
200-204 EAST LIBERTY STREET
Laundry X7Ca2ses
For Parcel Post
SLATERS BOOK SHOP
PEONE 430 336 S. STATE ST.

I

You can get those Neolin 'Soles put
on at Paul's Place, 611 E. William,
while you wait.-Adv.

Officers' Uniforms and accessories,
G. H. Wild & Co., State Street.-Add.

Don't forget the M. B. A. Dance
the Daily classified columns.-- night. Good music.-Adv.

to-

Use

' f "I

Young Men
Do you want to be
over clothed or
would you rather be
well clothed ?

STOP AT
TU'TTLE S
338 MAYNARD
For Lunches and Sodas
HANDY INFORMATION FOR
ANN ARBOR TRAVELERS
DETROIT UNITED LINES
Between Detroit, Ann Arbor and Jackson
(Effective May 2z, 1917')
Detroit Limited and Express Cars-7:35 a.
in., 8 :o a. m, and hourly to 7:1o p. m., 9:10.
p. Mn.
Kalamazoo Limited Cars-8:48 a. mn. and
every two hours to 6:48 p. i.; to Lansing,
8:48 p. m.
Jackson Express Cars tlocal stops west of
Ann Arbor)-9:48 a. m. and every two hours
to 7:48 A. m.
Local Cars East Bound.--5:35 a. in., 6:40
a. m., 7:o a. m. and every two hours to7:
p. m.. 8:os p. m.. 9:os p. M., ioso p. in.
To Ypsilanti only, 9:20 a. m., 9:50 a m.,
2:0A p. in.. 6:05 p. m, 9:4$ P. In, 11 :45 ,p. i.,
12:20 a. M.. 1x:10 a. in.. 1 :20 a. Mn. To Saline,
change at Ypsilanti.
Local Cars West Bound-6:os a. m., 7:48
a. m.. 10:20 p. n.M, 12:20 a. m.
'We have both the inclination and
the equipment to furnish the
best in banking service
The Ann.Arbor Savings Bank
INcORPORATED 1869
Capitalland Surplus $ 500,000.00
Resources . . . $4,000,000.00
Northwest Corner Main and
Huron Streets
707 North University Avenue

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Money spent at the bars gets;
a headache. Loaned for Liberty
it buys a soldier clothes, food,
and ammunition.

you--
bonds
rifles,

Do You Know that the
SUGAR BOWL
has one of the best equipped
Candy Stores in the state?
They have their own Refrigerating
System, and make their own Ice
Cream and Candies.
You are invited to visit and in-
spect their plant.......
Phone 967 109 5. Main St.
Your everyBank-
in g need ftufilled at

COMMUNICATIONS
"Communications not to exceed 300
words in length, or notices of events
will be published in The Daily, at the
discretion of the Editor-"
The Daily wishes to make clear the
above statement, which appears in
the paper each morning above the
editorial column. Criticisms have
come in to the office asking if this pa-
per took such and such a stand on a
certain topic, and if not, why such
material was allowed in print.

The symbol of a soldier is France
is a uniform and an army rifle. The
symbol of a soldier at home is a Lib-
erty loan bond button.
Are Michigan men slackers?
Students Slow in Physical Exams
Dr. George A. May, physical di-
rector of Waterman gymnasium, re-
quests all freshmen who have not yet
received their physical examinations
to appear at their scheduled time. The
examinations are progressing more
slowly than those of last year.

We believe that the really well
clothed man is the man who is
tastily and conservatively clothed.
It is not necessary to let your
clothes shout for you, it is much
better to let them merely whisper.

WAGNER & CO.
State Street at Liberty
Established 1848

Farmers & Mechanics
101-105 So, Main 300 So.
""" N eis

F

GEORGE BiscIXoF
Cholee Cut Flowers and Ph
220 ChaplnSt. Phone 80

Shoes repaired while you wait.
G. Andres, 222 S. State St.--Adv.

O.

7-M

F,

A

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