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October 23, 1917 - Image 1

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1917-10-23

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

v "PIA J1 1 ~ 1
R, CLOUDY,
FLURRIES

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yrLein

41IaiI

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DAY AND NIGHTI
SERVICE

_ _

XXVIII. No. 19.
IVERSITY AND
;ITY OFFICIALS
TO HEAD PARADE

ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN, TUESDAY, OCTOBER 23, 1917.

PRICE T

t r

AND
IN

STUDENTS WILL JOIN
SECOND LOAN
PAGEANT

TIRE STUDENT BODY
XCUSED FROM CLASSES
ch Begins at 3:30 O'clock from
North Maui and Ann
Streets

CITY REPORTS NEW
SMALLPOX VICTIMS,
Taxi Driver and Mother Stricken Sun-
day; Students Urged to
be Vaccinated
Two new cases of small-pox were
reported to J. A. Wessinger, city
health officer yesterday. Rudolph
Burk, 22 Murray street, and his moth-
er are both in quarantine.' Burk drove
his taxi a day after he had contracted
I he disease.
Dr. Wessinger was not very opti-
mistic in regard to the outlook. "For
the next 14 or 16 days we may expect
new cases daily, and the students of
t" e University should take every pre-
caution."
Dr. Harold Forsythe of the health
service, said that the students should
realize the importances of such an
epidemic and should co-operate with
tVi health authorities in every way.
Students can be vaccinated free at the
the health service from 8:30 to 11:30
o'clock in the morning, and from 2 to
4 o'clock in the afternoon. Only a
few have been vaccinated.
"Possible exposure to infection
should make students realize the
gravity of the situation and help pre-
vent an epidemic by vaccination," is
the health service plea.
LOCAL DRAFT SIFT
PROVES NOTHING

Lloyd George Thinks
Now Would Mean
Later On

PREMIER' SAYS NO
PEACE IS VISIBLE

STATES WAR IN FUTURE FULL
OF TERRIBLE POSSIBILITIES
Way to Thwart Struggle Is to Prepare
for Long One; British Now
Sink Subs

Coolness of Skipper Saves Cassin
From Torpedoes of Submarine

Terms Made
Struggle

Washington, Oct. 22--Coolness and
quick manuevering by Commander
Walter H. Vernou probably saved the
American destroyer Cassin from de-
struction in an encounter with a Ger-
man submarine in the war zone on
Oct. 16, the navy department was ad-
vised by Vice-Admiral Sims in his full
report of the fight.
Before she had an opportunity to
fire a shot the destroyer was hit on
the stern by a torpedo which killed
the gunner's mate, Osmond Kelly In-
gram; slightly wounded five others of
the crew and put one engine out of
commission.
The Cassin had been searching half
an hour for a submarine, first sighted
five miles away, when Commander
Vernou suddenly saw a torpedo 400.

yards distant and making for the ship
with great speed. Realizing that his
vessel was in imminent danger of be-
ing hit amidships and broken in two,
the commander ordered full speed
ahead and put the wheel hard over.
The boat was just clear of the tor-
pedo's path when the projectile ap-
peared on the surface, turned sharply
and hit its objective. Recovering
quickly from the shock of the explos-
ion, the captain continued the search,
and was finally rewarded by a sight
of the U-boat's conning tower.
Four shots were sent at the Ger-
man's and two came so close that the
submarine quickly went under again.
The Cassin, convoyed by other
American and British patrol boats,
finally made port.

STUDENT.COUNC,
FAILS TO UPPLA
CLASS C NTE~
INVESTIGATION OF SUBSTII
IN COMMITTEEMEN'S
HANDS
WILL MANAGE J-HOP
ON ECONOMICAL SCi
Monster Nebraska Pep Meeting S
uled Friday Night at
Auditorium

* * * * ,* * * *

*

The loan situation as it
the University:
I Kappa Psi ........

s
.1

eta,,Beta Tau. . ........
enior engineers ..........
eta Theta P#..........
hinese club ... ......
amnpus Tent-Trigon .....
ipha Delta Phi...........
ewberry residence....
hi Kappa Sigma ........
eta Psi....... ........

tands *
*
$5,450 *
4,000 *
3,200 *
2,600 *
2,550
2,250
1,950 *
1,850 *
1,750 *T
1,650 *

Student subscriptions since Sat-
urday, $19,600.
Student total to date, $56,200.
Faculty subscriptions since Sat-
urday, $23,600. .
Faculty total to date, $114,550.'

.*
,*
s

Secret Session Results to Be
Public at Close of In-
vestigation

London, Oct. 22.-"I have- scanned
the horizon intently," said Premier
Lloyd George today, "and can see no
terms in sight which will lead to en-
during peace. The only terms now
possible would mean an armed truce
ending in an even more frightful
struggle."
The premier said he had hoped the
enemies' terrible power might be
broken this year, but that the tem-
porary collapse of the Russian mili-
tary power had postponed his hope.
The war, said the premier, was ter-
rible in itself, but more terrible in the
possibilities it revealed of horrors on
land, sea, and in the air. It must be
settled now ;once for all, he declared.
If the war should be renewed after
30 years more of scientific application,
it would mean the death of civiliza-
tion. Brute force must be dethroned
for ever.,
The way to thwart the war, Lloyd
George sai4, was to prepare for a long
war. He added, "I am not going to
predict when the war will end. No
man in his senses would prolong the
war an hour longer than is necessary
to secure a lasting peace, but it must
be a lasting peace, not a prelude to
a more devastating war."
More than twice as many German
submarines have been sunk in the
first ten months of this year as were
during all last year, the premier as-
serted. The British tonnage loss
monthly now is not much more than
one-third of the total destroyed last
April.
ORATORICAL ASSOCIATION
PICKS OFFICERS FOR YEAR

Made

*

* * * * * * * * * *

+k * * * * i * *#*#* *
With President H. B. Hutchins and
Mayor E. M. Wurster leading the Lib-
erty day parade, Ann Arbor is to wit-
ness the greatest demonstration for
the. second national loan tomorrow.
President Hutchins issued a procla-
mation yesterday suspending all class-
es after 2:30 o'clock tomorrow after-
noon in order that the students may
participate in the ceremonies. In con-
formity with President Wilson's pro-
clamation in designating a Liberty
loan day, Mayor Wurster issued a call
to all merchants in the city asking
them to close their places of busi-
ness at 3 o'clock Wednesday and to
take part in the parade.
The march is to begin promptly at
3:30 o'clock from North Main and Ann
streets, from there it will move over
the important sections of the city. The
University band, two city bands, the
student body, the school children and
the Boy Scouts and every Ann Arbor
organization will form the nucleus.
S. W. Millard is marshal of the day,
President Hutchins and Mayor Wurs-
ter will lead the parade followed by
the University band, students, Red;
Cross nurses, city band and a mimic
British tank mounted with wooden
guns.
All bond holders are asked to take
part in the parade. Individuals are
to be supplied with flags. Organiza-
tions are requested to turn out in full
force with banners showing the'
amount subscribed to by their mem-
bers.
The line of march will be as fol-
lows: Starting from North Main and
Ann streets, the marchers will go to
William street, then east on Division,
again north on Division to Huron, east
on Huron to State, south on State to
Jefferson, west on Jefferson, then to
Fifth, north on Fifth to Williams,
where it will disband. No vehicles or
automobiles will be allowed. Every-
one is expected to walk.
The parade is in charge of Herbert
Tenney, who is arranging it for the
city, and A. E. Horne, '18, and Lieu-
tenant Mullen, who will form the stu-
dent line of march. Particulars as to
the place of meeting for the students
will be announced in tomorrow's
Daily.
IT. OF M. GRADUATE AWARDED
SIX CENTS IN DAMAGE SUIT
A judgment of 6 cents was awarded
to the plaintiff in the case of Walter
McKenzie vs. the Detroit, Jackson and
Chicago Railway company in circuit
court before Judge Kinne yesterday.
McKenzie, who is a graduate of the
University Law school, was thrown
from a moving interurban car in Ypsi-
lanti in October, 1914, and received
bruises to his head and body.

Failure to substantiate alleged
charges of bribery against a member
of the local draft board was all that
resulted in yesterday's examination of
witnesses in the grand jury investiga-'
tion conducted by Judge William G.
Doty, who is sifting the rumors that
a certain member of the board re-
ceived $600 for the alleged improper
exemption of a man from national
army service.
Among the witnesses that were ex-
kmined yesterday was the man who
was alleged to have been improperly
exempted as a result of paying $600.
The proceedings are drawing to a
close and the results of the probe
which so far have been kept secret,
may then be disclosed. Judge Doty
is at present engaged in a search for
the man who circulated tie rumors
about the draft board. In case he is
found to be guilty of wilful misstate-
ment a, warrant will be sworn out
against him charging him with
slander.
WOMAN'S LEAGUE PLANS
UNIQUE GYM PARTY
Something novel and enjoyable in
the way of entertainment is promised
by the Woman's league at their mem-
bership party Wednesday afternoon
from 4 to 6 o'clock in Barbour gym-
nasium.
This is the league's first large party
this year. Among the afternoon's fea-
tures are an original play by Wyvern,
honorary society of junior girls, and
dancing with the necessary musical
accompaniment by Ike Fischer.
Varsity Glee Club Tryouts Out Soon
Results of the Varsity Glee club try-
outs have not as yet been ascertained,
due to the difficulty in looking up
eligibility records. A list of all those
selected will be published soon.

Neal D. Ireland, '18L, and Joseph D.
Menchhofer, '18, were elected presi-
dent and secretary of the Oratorical
association at a meeting of the Ora-
torical board last night in Mason hall.
John C. Cary, '19, was chosen a mem-
ber of the executive committee.
The election was the result of the
vacancies that were made due to the
failure to return to school of those
officers elected last year. According
to the constitution the vacancies were
to be filled by the Oratorical board,
but the board allowed members of the
Oratorical association present to vote.
Election of the other members to the
executive committee has been deferred
until the oratorical delegates are
elected by the classes.
WOMEN'S LEAGUE NOW HAS
600 ON MEMBERSHIP ROLL
According to Ruth MacLachlan, '18,
general chairman, the Women's league
now numbers 600 members, with- the
campaign still in full swing. A sys-
tematized attempt has been made to
reach every league and sorority house
in the University, irrespective of size,
on this question.
Marian Galton, '18, is chairman of
this work at Martha Cook dormitory.
Lois Bennallick, '17, heads the commit-
tee at Newberry residence. Work
among the smaller groups is directly
under the supervision of the general
chairman.
Construction of Library Progresses
Work on the new Library build-
ing is now going on rapidly and the
pouring of cement for the first floor
has been completed.
The stack elevator is as yet in-
complete but register faces are being.
put in. When these are finished, the
large fans to be used for ventilating
purposes will be started.
1,805 Cornellians in Service
According to statistics recently com-
piled, it has been shown that there
are 1,805 Cornellians who attended
Cornell during 1916-17, in the service
of their government.

DIVIDE1 DRAFTED MEN IN
FIVE CLASSIFICATIONS
NEW NATIONAL ARMY TO ASSEM-
BLE ACCORDING TO RECENT
SCHEME OF BOARD
Washington, Oct. 22.-Five classifi-
cations in which men awaiting dlraft
will be divided under the new plans
of the board and which are approved
by President Wilson, have been an-
nounced as follows:
Class L
1. Single men without dependent
relatives. 2. Married man (or widow-
er with children) .who habitually fails
to support his family. 3. Married men
dependent on wife for support. 4.
Married men (or widower with child-
ren) not usefully employed, family
supported by income independent of
his labor. 5. Men not included in any
other description in this or other
classes. 6. Unsklled labor.
Class IL.
1. Married man or father of mother-
less children, usefully engaged, but
family has sufficient income apart
from his daily labor to afford reason-
ably adequate support during his ab-
sence. 2. Married man-no children-
wife can support herself decently and
without hardship. 3. Skilled farm lab-
orer engaged in necessary industrial
enterprise. 4. Skilled industrial lab-
orer engaged in necessary agricultur,
al enterprise.
Class II,
1. Man with foster children depend-
ent on daily labor for support. 2.
Man with aged, infirm or invalid par.
ents or grandparents dependent on
daily labor for support. 4. County or
.municipal officer. 5. Firemen or pol-
icemen. 6. Necessary artificers or
workmen in arsenals, armories and
navy yards. 7. Necessary custom house
clerk. 8. Persons necessary in trans-
mission of mails. 9. Necessary em-
ployes in service of United States. 10.
Highly specialized administrative ex-
perts. 11. Technical or mechanical
experts in industrial enterprise. 12.
Highly specialized agricultural expert
in agricultural bureau of state or
nation. 13. Assistant or associate
manager of necessary industrial en-
terprise. 14. Assistant or associate
manager of necessary agricultural en-
terprise.
Class IV.
1. Married man with wife (and)
or children (or widower with cala-
ren) dependent on daily labor ' .up-
port and no other reasonably _.,quate
support available. 2. Mariners in sea
service of merchants or citizens in
United States. 3. Heads of necessary
industrial enterprises. 4. Heads of
necessary agricultural enterprises.
Class V.
1. Officers of states or the United
States. 2. Regularly or duly ordained
ministers. 3. Students of divinity. 4.
Persons in military or naval service.
5. Aliens. 6. Alien enemies. 7. Per-
sons morally unfit. 8. Persons physic-
ally, permanently or mentally unfit.
9. Licensed pilots.
Band Bounce Date Nov. S1
A tentative date of Nov. 8 has been
set for the annual band bounce, prep-
arations for which are being made
rapidly, atcording to a statement made
by Gerald F. Nye, '19, yesterday. .
Proceeds will be used to convey the
bond either to the University of Penn-
sylvania or to Northwestern univer-
sity when the team plays there.

FORMER MICHIGAN MAN
[EADS MOVIE SERVICE
THEODORE WILLIAMS TO ORGAN-
IZE FOREIGN AND HOME
DEPARTMENTS
Theodore Williams, a former Mich-
igan student, has been appointed to or-
ganize and direct the photographic
news, and publicity service both at
home and in France. He was given a
commission as first lieutenant but, be-
cause of the importance of his work,
will undoubtedly be promoted soon.
Williams left the University in Dec.
1916, in order to organize the motion
picturedepartment of the Packard
Motor Car company. He was so suc-
cessful In this work that when the gov-
ernment decided to establish such a
branch of the service they asked him
to take charge.
Photographs of the enemy's posi-
tions taken from aeroplanes will be
the most important work of this .de-
partment. Special lenses are needed
for this kind of photography and the
United States has been called upon to'
supply them. Germany was the former
source of supply.
NEBRASKA DRILLS
BY BUCKING GALE
Four Regulars Fall to Show Up for
Regular Practice; Workout
Lasts -Hour
Detroit, Oct. 22.-A special to the
Free Press from Lincoln, Neb., reads
as follows:
"The Cornhuskers today inaugurated
the final week of preparation for the
Michigan game by bucking an ice-
fringed gale which swept down from
bleak Montana."
Head Coach Stewart gave his men
a brief drill in new formations. The
workout lasted less than an hour.
Four of the regulars, Captain Shaw,
Otoupalik, Schellenberg and Kojitsky
failed to show up for Monday drill;
The captain suddenly cultivated a
fever attack during the afternoon
which the others are laid up with in-
juries received in the Notre Damet
game. All are expected to be out
Wednesday.
THIEVES STEAL $200 FROM
DELTA THETA PHI HOUSE
Breaking into the DeltaTheta Phi
house between 1:30 and 7 o'clock yes-
terday morning, burglars robbed its
inmates f money and clothing ap-
proximating $200. This is the fourth
robbery that has occurred at the Delta
Theta Phi house since the middle of
last June. Suits, overcoats, and shoes
were among the articles stolen. An
overcoat containing $400 was over-
looked.
Nickels' Arcade to Hold Fete Friday
Nickels' arcade will be lined with
refreshment stands, vaudeville and
fortune telling booths, a Punch and
Judy show, and various other exhibits
on Friday and Saturday nights, when
the board of directors of the Old La-
dies' home will hold a benefit festival.
Admission to the "midway" will be
10 cents and there will be dancing on
the second floor of the'arcade.

* THE STUDENT COUNCIL IN
* THEIR SUNDAY MEETING
* Failed to find a suitable substitai
* for the fall contests which we
* voted down by Senate counei
* Voted to recommend a sIml4
* and cheaper "J" hop because 4
* war conditions,.
* Decided to hold a "pop" meetin
* Friday night, October 2, for tli
* Nebraska game.
* * ** * * * * * * * *'
No substitute was found for the
games by the Student council at t
meeting Sunday afternoon at
Union.
The greater part of the meeting'l
given over to the discussion of
situation, which the council was
expectedly forced into by' the act
of the Senate council, Oct. 15.
committee to investigate any post
substitute was appointed and the
-structions given to the correspond
secretary to write letters to 11 or
other universities in the middle NO
inquiring what games or contests w
held at these universities between
two lower classes.
Substitutes were brought up
none were of a nature practical
the situation here. Besides the m
ideas of this nature which were
jected, nearly as many for meth
of investigating possible plans to t
the place of the abandoned conte
were turned down as being unsuita
The committee appointed consisti
C. A. Hart, '18E, H. C. Cramer, 1
and E. C. Schacht, '18E. Cramer'
the chairman of the fall game comr
tee which was dissolved prior to
naming of the new members.
3-Hop Will Be Given
When the matter of the fall gas
was finally disposed of, the cou
turned its attention to the 3-hop i
adopted a resolution by a unanim
vote recommending that the chief
cial event of Michigan which was e
mated by Waldo McKee, '18E, 1
year's chairman, to cost a quarte
a million dollars, be managed as e
nomically as possible.
While it was not stated in the re
lution, it'is the evident wish of
council that the party be made
formal, decorations minimized r
taxi cabs omitted.
One of the members suggested t
the features by paid entertainers I
year be provided by volunteer ci
pus players and the profits from
affair be given to one of the m
needy charitable insitutions now
ing the war relief work.
This action is similar to steps
ing taken in many other universil
in various parts of'the country. '
reason for the change is the need
economizing in every respect for 1
relief donations.
Nebraska Pep Meeting Friday
A third action of importance
taken shortly before the meeting
journed regarding a pep meeting
Friday night, Oct. 26, to stir up
for the Nebraska game.
It was thought by the council I
the game would be of sufficient
portance to warrant a mass meet
and after some discussion the con
decided to hold a mass meeting. C
Yost's statement that the Nebra
game would be the best of the see
was one of the important reasons
the conclusion.
A committee consisting of .
Schacht, '18E, C. 'A. Harl, '181,
S. S. Attwood, '18X, was appointe
secure speakers and make other
rangements for the pop meeting.

*
*
*
*
*
*

* , * * * * * * * * * , *
SPECIAL ORDER SUSPENDING.*
UNIVERSITY EXERCISES WED- *
NESDAY AFTERNOON, OCTOB- *
ER 24, AT 2:30 O'CLOCK. *
*

y,

* The President of the United
* States having appointed Wednes-
* day, the 24th of October, as Liber-
* ty Day, and having urged the peo-
* ple ot\the country appropriately to
* observe the day, it is ordered that
* University exercises of every kind
* be suspended Wednesday after-
* noon, October 24, at 2:30 o'clock
* in order that members of the dif-
* ferent faculties and students may
* take part in a patriotic parade
* and demonstration to be planned
* for that afternoon. It is hoped
* and expected. that all will respond
* to this patriotic call.
* H. B. HUTCHINS,
* i President.
*i# * * #.* * #*.X14 * *# *# *

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