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October 20, 1917 - Image 2

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The Michigan Daily, 1917-10-20

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w9

PAGE TWO

'

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

SATURDAY, OCTOBER 20, 1917

MEMBER ASSOCIATED PRESS
The Associated Press is exclusively entitled
to the use for republication of all news dis-
patches credited to it or not otherwise credit-
ed in this paper and also the local news
published herein.
Official newspaper at the University of
Michigan. Published every morning except
Monday during the university year.
Entered at the postoffice at Ann Arbor as
second-class matter.
Offices: Ann Arbor Press Building. Sub-
scriptions: by carrier, $2.50; bymail,'$3.00.
Want ad stations: Quarry's ; Students' Sup-
ply Store; The Delta. Phones: Business, 960;
Editorial, 2414.
Communications not to exceed 300 words
in length, or notices of events will be pub-
lished in The Daily, at the discretion of the
Editor, if left at the office in the Ann Arbor
Press Bldg., or in the notice box in the west
corridor of the general library, where the
notices are collected at 7:30 o'clock each
evening.
Robert T. McDonald. .......Managing Editor
C. Philip Emery..........Business Manager
UNION .BEL>
SATURDAY, OCTOBER 20, 1917
IN CHARGE OF THIS ISSUE
Editor-Clarence Roeser
Managers-William M. LeFevre, Har-
old It. Smith
Assistants-Donald C. Bromley, James
Robertson, Harry D. Hause, L. A.
Storrer, Lambert Hirscheimer
THE FIRST REAL TEST
Today's game with M. A. C. mark-
ed the first real test of Michigan's
1917 football team.
There can be no doubt that the
Maize and Blue met a worthy oppon-
ent, one always to be feared. For the
past five years the Lansing school
has made Yost show nearly everything
he has had. On two occasions since
1912 Michigan has been beaten, once
by the convincing score of 24-0.
Michigan's team for the remainder
of the present season will be almost
decided upon the showing the men
have made on Ferry field this after-
noon. And Michigan's strength for
the balance of the season can easily
be measured by the strength she ex-
hibited upon the gridiron today.
Whether the Aggies display strength
early in the year or not, they can al-
ways be depended upon to do their
level best when meeting Michigan.
Anyway it was a good game.
Didja have your girl there?
It is rumored that the Aggies might
have looked better with Julian, the
Millers, DePrato, and Smith scatter-
ed around in their lineup.
Those geutlemen from Lansing al-
ways could put up a fight when play-
ing Michigan.

BACKS WORRYYOST
FROMEARLY START
First Shake-up Places Tad Wieman,
Herculean Tackle, in Full-
back Position
WARTIME ELEVEN EQUALS LAST
YEAR'S TEAM SAYS DOUGLAS
Varsity Defeats Detroiters in Hard
Fought Contest by Score
of 14 to 3
(By M. G. ledi)
Michigan rooters were given their
first taste of sport dope concerning
the Varsity this fall, when Coach
Fielding H. Yost made the statement,
"Backs my worry." From the first
practice up to the present time, Yost
has shifted the players promiscuously
in the hope of discovering prospects
for his back trio. The first shake-up
struck Tad Wieman, the herculean
tackle, who was placed in fullback
position, his power and driving force
offsetting the lightness of the other
backs.
Of the other three "M" men, Sparks,
the winged-foot quarterback, was al-
lowed to hold down his own position,
while Weske was sent to tackle, and
Boyd made to see service at guard and
tackle.
Wartime Eleven Equals '16 Squad
On the Friday night before the clash
with the Case school warriors, Coach
Prentiss H. Douglas annihilated the
pessimistic germs of some of the
Michigan rooters, when he said that
the "Wartime eleven equals the '16
squad." To substantiate this state-
ment the Varsity on Saturday wallop-
ed Case 41 to 0. This victory, how-
ever, did not defer Yost from making
other shake-ups in the line and back-
field, to remedy the ragged defense of
the ends and backs, and also to better
the aggressiveness of the line.
Wednesday the Kazoo gridders in-
vaded Ferry field and threw a scare
into the bleachers at the first, but the
final score 14 to 3 in favor of Mich-
igan was sufficient compensation for
missed heart beats. This game show-
ed , an improved defensive backfield
and flankers, though the line was a
little loose at times. The backs still
fell short of the Coach's ideal of
ground gainers.
Pummel Oloioans in 61 to 0 Count
In the Mount Union clash a new
Varsity administered a decisive lick-
ing to the Ohioians, the final count be-
ing 61 to 0. This time the backs
pierced the line and skirted the ends
for big gains. The open play work
of the opponents was terribly molest-
ed by Michigan ends and backs, while
the linemen plowed through the op-
posing force at will, stopping the run-
ners in their tracks.
The biggest shake-up of the season
occurred the Thursday of the Detroit
battle. Seven players were shifted in-
to new positions and the remodeled
Varsity scalped the Detroiters by a 14
to 3 score. This game was a battle
royal from the start to finish, and
gave the rooters more excitement
than was expected.
The defensive work of the team
was extraordinary good, while the
offensive was aggressive and sharp.
Forward passing proved successful in
two of the four attempts, netting long
gains. The line in the fourth quarter
took a stonewall appearance, when
the opposing backs flung them-
selves at it four times, gaining but

three yards. With four victories to
her credit thus far, the Varsity enter-
ed the field this afternoon confident
that it would force the M. A. C. pig-
skin chasers to bite the dust.

COACH FEILDING H. YOST
YOST WINS HURRY UP"
TITLE AL LAYETT
FOOTBALL MENTOR BRINGS 111E
BACON TO SIX COLLEGES
IN 19 YEARS
(By James I. McAlpine)
Fielding H. Yost, commonly known
as "Hurry Up" Yost, one of the most
popular coaches of the West, and
teacher of Michigan's elevens since
1901, has had 19 years of experience
in making football history. His scope
of work has included Ohio Wesleyan,
Lafayette, Nebraska, Kansas, Stanford
and Michigan.
Yost first played college football in
Ohio Wesleyan, but did not earn his
name of "Hurry Up" until later, when
he played tackle with the Lafayette
team. In 1896, Yost's last year, this
team won the championship of the
country by romping away with a vic-
tory over Pennsylvania, the score be-
ing 6-4. The football mentor then
wentto Ohio Wesleyan to coach, and
easily turned out a team that brought
home the championship of Ohio.
Yost Wins Title of West for Kansas
In 1898, Yost coached Nebraska, and
the next year returned to Kansas,
winning the title of the West from
Nebraska by a score of 36-20. After
this season, Leland Stanford univer-
sity called, and in 1900, "Hurry Up"
gave that school a team which won the
championship of the Pacific coast from
California by a score of 5-0.
Following this year at California,
Yost came'to Michigan, where he has
kept his record of producing fast
teams. His team of 1901 to 1904
scored enough points to win the name
of the "point-a-minute" elevens. In
these four years, Michigan won 43
games, tied one, and lost none. This
was the time of Willie Heston.
Yost's contract was made in 1911,
and was originally intended for the
seasons of 1912 and 1913. It has since
been extended so that it will continue
until one party notifies the other of
its revocation, giving at least 30 days
notice. It is reported that Yost has
often stated he would be through with
football when he left Michigan.
Indians Give Special Short Course
At Indiana a special short course
will be offered to drafted men who
have not yet been called.

Favored Freshman
FanciesFootball
Yearling Enthusiast Yearns to See
Gridiron Battles on Ferry
Field
(By Mark H. Ehlbert)
He was quite a Football Fan. For
years he had Attended every Contest
between the Gridiron Ginks and the
Goal Grabbers. His Knowledge of the
Game was greater than that of many
older Football Fiends. And he was
only a Freshman at that.
When he arrived at the Doors of
Ann Arbor's Seat of Learning he had
decided to be Present at every Ferry
Field Fight. He soon found that the
Prerequisite to Admittance was a
small Volume known as an Athletic
Coupon Book. Now to Obtain one of
these useful Articles, thought the Em-
bryo Enthusiast.
It so Happened that his Knowledge
of Ann Arbor Customs was not as
great as his Familiarity with the Out-
door Sport. Accordingly he must Seek
Information. And who could Advise
him better than the Erudite Senior
on the Floor below?
So to the Scholarly Upperclassman
he turned his Steps.
After a few moments of Feet-Shift-
ing, Cap-Twisting, Lip-Moistening and
other Forms of Physical Agony, he
Ventured to Articulate:
"How do I Get one of those Athletid
Books?"
And after a short Period of Medita-
tion, the Obliging Senior spoke.
"Have you any Pull on the Cam-
pus?" Inquired he.
"Yes, I Know Coach Yost," Replied
the Innocent Enjoyer of Football
Games.
"Well, that may Help some," Said
the Senior Meditatively. "You Go and
Get a Letter from him and then Go
over to Huston's. Tell the Manager
what you Want and that you have
a Letter from Coach Yost. He ought
to Let you Have a Book for Nothing."
And he Departed on his way Rejoic-
ing that he had some Pull.
"Thank you so much, Sir, I'll do
that. I'm ever so much Obliged to
you,"-in Tones of Deepest Gratitude.
Moral: Coach Yost is Busy once
in a While.
EVE'S PROTEGES RICK MEN
OFF CHEER LINE AT IOWA
Iowa sprang an innovation in the
rooting line at the Nebraska-Iowa foot
ball game last Saturday, when three
women led theecheering. The idea
worked well even though Iowa was
beaten by a large score. The women
cheerleaders brought cheers from men
who were never known to root for foot
ball before.
"Ghost Ball" Used at California
The football team of the Univer-
sity of California is being developed at
night by means of large searchlights
and a "ghost ball".

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Give the same careful expert attention to your
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P, S. I have the Daines & Nickels Negatives.

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'I

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Straight through the Arcade from State St.



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WAHR'S
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Those cigarettes you bought
part of the money you might
put into a Liberty bond out of
pocket.

took
have
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CIVIL WAR MARKS
ADVENT OF SPORT
NIc'- -'i- Plays Football with Teams
of 15 Men; Uses Round 1ub-
ber Ball
Athletics at Michigan began shortly
after the Civil war.
Baseball was the first sport intro-
duced. The game was then in its in-
fancy, being played only by a few
clubs in the vicinity of New York. A
few men interested wrote to one of
the clubs and obtained a description
of the game. A diamond wN*s laid out
north of the old Medical building, bats
and balls bought, and Michigan was
a contender for the championship of
the west. Emory L. Grant, of Ken-
osha, Wis., captained the first regular
Varsity nine, organized in 1865-1866.
Football came about a decade later,
being played at that time with a round
rubber ball and with teams of 15 men
on each side. Benjamin T. Cable of
Illinois, a short time after returned
from a trip to Germany, bringing back
with him a leather covered ball.
Since 1900 Michigan's football rec-
ord has been brighter than that of
any other American university, due
largely to the coaching of Fielding H.
Yost, wha has had a uniformly good
team every year.

Yale to Get French "15's"
Yale is to have four of the French
"75's" for purposes of instruction in
their military camp.

No Drill, No Football
Men who do not take up military
training at Yale this year will not be
allowed to play football.

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