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June 04, 1918 - Image 1

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1918-06-04

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FHE WEATHER
ROBABLY SHOWERS;I
TODAY

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~iaitll

ASSOCIATED
PRESS
DAY AND NIGH'T WIR4
SERVICE

y

VOL. XXVIII. No. 177.

ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN, TUESDAY, JUNE 4, 1918.

PRICE THREE CENTw

,. i r

HUNG HURL FRESH
TROOPS AGAINST
HUN GAINS DIMINISHED AS RE-
SERVES FILL BREACH; FOE
LOSS GREAT
FAMOUS PRUSSIAN
GUARD WITHDRAWN
Enemy Hold Northern Bank of Marne;
"Sea Wolves" Sink Seven
U. S Vessels;
(By The Associated Press)
Paris, June 3.-The battle in France
was resumed with great intensity dur-
ing the night and in the course of the
day, according to the war office to-
night. The Germans attacked with
fresh troops between the Oise and the
Ourcq with redoubled violence.
(By The Associated Press)
Although it cannot be said that the
Germans in their new offensive .ave
been definitely stopped, there is, nev-
er-the-less, a marked diminution in
the speed with which they started.out,
and their gains since Saturday have
been relatively smaller in comparison
with those of previous days.
Germans Sustain Heavy Losses
According to accounts of unofficial
observers, whenever the Germans
have been able since the stiffening of
the Allied lines to attain new positions
the enormous cost of lives has been so
great the Prussian guard (the pride
of the crown prince) is declared to
have been withdrawn from the battle.
The German war office at last has
admitted that the Allied lines on the
west has been re-enforced with fresh
units, but it insists that the new units
have not been able tohold the posi-
tions to which they were assigned.
Nevertheless, the fact is plain from
an observation of the war map, that
almost everywhere in this region the
German line is being hard held.
Allies Still Hold Rheims
From Chateau-Thierry, eastward
along the Marne, and thence to
Rheims, the situation is virtually un-
changed from that of Sunday. The
enemy now holds the northern bank of
the Marne for a distance of about 15
miles, but as yet has made no attempts
to cross the stream.
The news of what it has cost the
German army in prisoners, killed or
wounded is reaching this country
through Germany by the semi-official
Norddeutsthe Alleemeine Zeitung.
This journal prints a letter from a
German colonel from the front who
urges the people to bear their losses
with patience and confidence.
Little fighting aside from the usual
small affairs between raiding parties
is taking place on the Flanders front.
Subs Sink U. S. Boats
Germany's "sea wolves" (the sub-
marines which have caused so much
devastation during the war) are prey-
ing on commerce at the Atlantic
ocean just off the shores of the United
States. They are known to have sunk
at least seven vessels, only a short
distance off land of the southern New
Jersey shore.
It is feared that still other vessels
have been sent to the bottom by the
marauders, the movements of which
have been reported at various times
during the last fortnight by ships
coming into port from southern wat-
ers. Thus far only one life is known
to have been lost from the sinkings.

The majority of the vessels were sunk
after their crews had been forced to
take to the ship's boats.
Lord Lieutenant Asks for 50,000 Irish
Dublin, June 3. - The Lord Lieu-
tenant issued a proclamation tonight
asking for 50,000 voluntary recruits,
and thereafter from - 2,000 to 3,000
monthly to maintain the Irish divi-
sion.

WAR STAMP DRIVE
TO OPEN JUNE 10
Citizens throughout the county, es-
pecially the merchants, will be asked
to display American and Allied flags
on June 1 0to signify the opening of
a drive to -fill the county quota for
war saving stamps.
A house to house canvass will be
held during the course of the cam-
paign to get the students and resi-
dents of Ann Arbor and vicinity to
pledge their share toward the quota
which, it is hoped, will be reached by
June 28. District meetings are being
held this week all over the county in
order to prepare the committees and
chairmen for the drive.
Officials in the local post office re-
ported last night that the progress in
the sale of stamps at the present time
is much more encouraging than it
was at any time since the opening of
the national campaign.
ALIENSINDTCM T
I TO BECOME .S1 CITIZENS
TRAINING BEGUN FOR 13 MEN IN
NON-COM. OFFICERS'
CLASS
Aliens in the first training detach-
ment will become citizens of the Unit-
ed States on Friday afternoon, ac-
cording to an announcement given
out last night. The detachment will
be among the very first to take ad-
vantage of the emergency nturaliza
tion law, which was passed by con-
gress about two months ago.
There are approximately 30 neu-
tral and friendly aliens among the'
special students. These men are rep-
resentatives, at the present time, of
England, Russia, Holland and Greece.
The detachment has no enemy aliens.
Men Take Out First Papers
First citizenship papers, for those
who do not possess -any, will be tak-
en out by the aliens in the detachment
before next Friday afternoon. The
men will march to the circuit court
under guard of an armed escort. In!
the court, the armed guard will pre-
sent arms as the men take the oath
of citizenship. Immediately after the
oath is taken, a band, probably the
Varsity, will play "The Star Spangled
Banner."
Night Classes Start
Non-commissioned officers' classes
commenced last night for the 13 men
selected by the captain of the de
tachment for special drill. The men
in this detail will have intensivb
classes every night, and will learn
the theory of the things they will
have to put into practice.
Several members of the detail were

CLUBS TO GiVE
FINALCONCERT
Sixty Men t) Appear in Spite of Num--
ijer 11114)Have Eiterel
Service
E NTIRE PROGRAM WILL B
NW; INCLUDES NOVILTES
Audience W4ill Be Invited to Join in
- Singing of Several
Numbers
Sixty men will appear in the final
concert of the Glee and Mandolin
club tomorrow evening in 1ill aud-
itorium.
Many members have entered the
service since the mid-year concert,
but the quality of the club nas not
been affected. Mr. Theodore Harri-
son, of the School of Music, director of
the Glee club, is confident that those
who have heard both mid-year and
Spring concerts will not be a bit dis-
appointed with the latter. The pro-
gram will be entirely new, and some
of the numbers are even better than
those used at the February appear-
ance of the club.
Special Numbers
The Mandolin club will have its us-
ual "jazz" sextet to give a number of
ragtime selections, and the Glee club
will have its Midnight Sons' quartet.
The appearance of the Varsity quar-
tet has not been decided upon yet. A
large amount of solo work will be
done at this concert- Alan D. Hon-
ey, '181), will give a selection of full
harmony mandolin pieces. Robert R.
Dieterle, '21M, will sing a solo num-
ber. This may be the last appear-
ance of Dieterle with the club. Edwin
S. Larsen, '20, will give several num-
bers on his accordion. Dieterle and
Larsen will be remembered as stars
of this year's Union opera.
"Everyone Sing"
The program, which is entirely
new, was announced yesterday by the
directors. It will contain several
snappy trench songs from "over.
there" which the audience will be
invited to sing with the club Among
the Glee club numbers are: "Mary,"
"Liza Lady" "The Musical Trus,"
"There's a Long, Long Trail," "Keep
the Home Fires Burning," "Prayer of
Thanksgiving," "The Star Spangled
Banner," the "Marseillaise," and
"America." The Mandolin c : has
not announced its numbers yet.
STORY TELLING CLASS WILL
ENTERTAIN CITY CHILDREN
Story telling for children will be the
order of business of Professor R. K.
Immel's class in that subject, this
afternoon at 4 o'clock in room 302
Mason hall. The entertainment will
be public and all children from 5 to
10 years of age are invited to attend
.the meeting as well as older persons
interested in this subject.
Three Hydroplanes Make Cuban Trip
Havana, June 3.-Two of the three
American hydroplanes, which arriv-
ed at a Cuban port last Friday on a
practice flight from the American At-
lantic coast, returned Saturday morn-
ing. One of the machines, before get-
ting away, was slightly damaged, by
bumping against a barge, but later
was repaired and left under its own
power. The third hydro-airplane is
being returned on board a steamship.
It was damaged by falling just after

it started to leave the water. Both oc-
cupants escaped injury.
Italy Mobilizes Civilians
Washington, June 3:-Italy is mob-
ilizing her civilian population for na-
tional war production.
Dispatches to the Italian embassy
here recently said the mobilization is
going on with satisfactory results. Al-
ready more than 100,000 men and
women recruits have volunteered.

U.S.

SHIPS BEGIN
SEARCH FOR SUBS

(By The Associated Press)
New York, June 3. - Scores of
United States warships were arrang-
ing in the waters off the north At-
lantic coast tonight in search of the
German submarines, which made
their long expected attacks on Amer-
ican shipping in home waters late
this afternoon.
Out of the flood of reports which
swept through the maritime district,
after the Associated Press first flash-
ed the news that two cruiser subma-
rines were operating 75 miles south-
east of the highlands of New Jersey,
these facts stand out:
Steamship Carolina Sunk
The steamship Carolina, of the New
York and Porta Rica steamship com-
pany, has been sunk. Nothing is
known of the 220 passengers, with a
crews of 120, who took to boats when
the underwater craft began shelling
the liner.
The steamer Edward H. Cole, of
Boston, has been sunk by bombs, and
Capt. H: J. Newcomb, of Boston, with
a crew of 10, has been landed here
after being rescued from an open
boat.
The schooner Jacob M. Haskell, of
Boston, Isabel B. Wiley, of Maine,
Hettie Dunn, Maine, and Samuel W.
Hathaway, have been sunk. The crew
of the Jacob M. klaskell is reported
to have been saved, but nothing is
known of the fate of the three other
crews.
Rescue 15 Survivors
The Savanah line steamship, City
of Columbus, is reported to have been
sunk, but no definite news of her
fate has been received.
Fifteen survivors of U-boat attacks
were brought to an Atlantic port to-
night by a steamship which picked
them up in small boats.
aUSTRIAN PRISONERS TELL
OF FIGHTING AROUND TRENT
Headquarters Italian Army, June 3.
--(Delayed)-Austrian prisoners cap-
tured in the patrol raids along the
mountain front tell of the intense ac-
tivity which centers at Trent, the
railway center of concentration
where all the Austrian men and sup-
plies are brought down for use in the
Brenta valley, Lagarina valley and
all along the mountain front.
The city itself, they say, is a huge
military camp which extends 10 miles
southward to Calliano, and eastward
through the Sugana valley which is
the great artery leading to the Bren-
ta valley and the plains of Italy. The
railways have been trebled, so that
this whole section is joined by a net-
work of railway sidings and connec-
tions.
Foreigners Cheer President Wilson
London, June 3. - President Wil-
son's name was given a remarkable
ovation by the Baptist union of Great
Britain and Ireland when at its recent
assembly G. W. Coleman, president of
the Northern Baptist Convention of
America, said that the President had
come to be accepted as the spokes-
man of all the Allies. The entire as-
sembly rose and cheered, the domon-
stration lasting for several moments.
The assembly adopted a resolution
expressing profound gratitude that
the United States was "with us in this
war for righteousness and liberty and
brotherhood and humanity."
Food Shortage Checks Dutch Charities
Amsterdam, June 3. - During the
first three years of the war, Dutch
charitable organizations have every
summer brought thousands of Ger-
man children and given them a sum-
mer vacation in Dutch homes, where

they could get better care and nour-
ishment than at home. This year the
society which has charge of the mi-
gration announces that it will be, im-
possible to get permits for any simi-
lar trips, owing to Holland's own food
shortage.

U-BOATS SINK 5 S9iLING CRAFTS,
AND OIL SHIP OFF JERSEY COAST
48 SURIVORS LAND ART NEW YORK

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Commenceinent Tickets
Any time after June 10, mem-
bers of the senior classes should
file with the secretaries of their
colleges requests for ticekts for'
their relatives for Commence-
ment day.'
* * * * * * * * * * *

*:
S:

CENTRAL POWERS AIM TO RE.
CALL YANKEE WARSHIPS ON
BRITISH SHORES
SUBMARINE SHELLS
U.S. LINER, CAROLINA
Coastwise Vessels, Bound for Atlantic
Ports, Unarmed; Crews Take
to Small Boats
(By The Associated Press)
New York, June 3,-Forty-eight sur-
vivors of vessels sunk by U-boats
were brought to port today by a coast-
wise vessel. About half of them had
been prisoners for several days aboard
the submarine.

FAVORS PLAN TO BRINGI
STUDENTS BACK IN FALL1

STUDENT
ATE

COUNCIL TO - CO-OPER-
WITH UNION AND
Y. M. C. A.

Members of the student council at
their meeting last night went on rec-
ord as being heartily in favor of all
plans whereby present students in
the University might be induced to
return in the fall, and whereby high
school boys and all men under draft
age may be kept at ther work until
such time as they may be required to
register.
The Daily and the Y. M. C. A. have
offered to co-operate with the stu-
dent council along these lines. The
organizations are following the prin-
ciple laid down by General Pershing
that the morale of the army is large-
ly dependent upon the education of
the individuals that form it.
Consider New Constitution
A new constitution for the council
was considered. Some of the salient
features adopted were the election of
the -president by the student body at
the annual spring elections for a term
of one year. Hitherto, the head of the
body has been elected to his position
by the members of the council them-
selves and his term of service was
limited to a single semester. Mem-
bers of the. council are to hold of-
fice from the time of their election
until the period of their graduation,
provided that such a term shall not
exceed four regular, semesters.
Will Become Familiar wth Duties
In explanation of the last step, the
advocates of the measure asserted
that in the past members of the coun-
cil were forced to relinquish their
seats at a time when they were be-
ginning to be of the greatest use to
the university. It is held that under
the new system a member will be en-
abled to become familiar with his du-
ties and opportunity will be given
him for putting into action any nec-
essary reforms which might become
apparent from a longer and more1
thorough study of student problems.
Announce Award of . Pulitzer Prizes
New York, June 3. - Award of the
Pulitzer prizes and traveling schol-
arships to be given at commencement
was announced today by the trustees
of Columbia university. The awards
were based upon the reports of juries
composed of prominent men. The
prizes were established by the late
Joseph Pulitzer, proprietor of the
New York World, in addition to his
endowment of the School of Journal-
ism at Columbia. Prizes in Journal-
ism, amounting to $3,000, were
awarded.
* * * * ** *** * *

given parts of platoons
afternoon to take out and
drills are becoming more
as the work progresses.

yesterday
drill. The
intensive

Washington, June 3.-Germany at
last has brought her submarine war-
fare to the shores of the United States.
Apparently it is a forlorn hope to
strike telling blows on this side of
the Atlantic in order to draw home
some of the American naval forces
from the war zone,- where the U-boat
menace is being slowly, but surely
mangled to death.
Have U-Boats Failed
In attacks upon coasting vessels, al-
most in sight of the New -Jersey shore
today, naval officials see a frantic ad-
mission from Berlin that the sub-mar-
ine has failed. American armed pow-
er is rolling overseas in an ever in-
creasing force, despite the utmost ex-
ertions of the undersea pirates off the
coasts of Europe.
Now the raiders have crossed the
sea and lurked for days near Amer-
ica's greatest port. They, no doubt,
were sent to sink transports, but here
again they failed. Fought off the
troop ships by convoy craft, they had
turned in fury against defenseless
coasters. The raiding party has struck
at no vessel bound overseas. Only
ships that could not hit back have been
attacked. The only one of a score of
vessels probably sunk to^ the bottom
that have any military value in ships
or cargo, was an oil tanker.
Subs Sink Five Vessels
Up to a late hour tonight the de-
struction of five sailing crafts and the
Herbert L. Pratt, was the record of
losses officially reported to the navy
department. The coastwise liner,-
Carolina, which reportd by wireless
yesterday she was being shelled, has
been sunk. The crews of some of the
craft destroyed have been brought into
port with a story of 11 days imprison-
ment aboard enemy submarines.
Secretary Daniels went to the cap-
itol during the day to tell members
of the house naval committee that the
raid was designed to frighten Amer-
ican people into demanding the return
of American war vessels from the tth-
er side. He gave assurance that con-
gress need have no apprehension as
to the protection of the American
coast, and thatthere would be no re-
call of vessels from the war zone.
Sec. Daniels issues Report
Tonight Mr. Daniels summarized the
information reaching the department
as follows:
"Naval department reports show the
following vessels have been sunk:
"Jacob M. Haskell, schooner, 1,362
tons, sailing from Boston for Norfolk,
11 in crew, no passengers.
"Mabel B. Wiley in ballast, net ton-
nage 611, crew eight.
"Hattie Dunn, of Rockland, Me., net
tonnage 365, in ballast, sailing for
Charleston.
"Edward H. Cole, Boston, tonnage
1,395, in ballast, bound for Norfolk,
Crew of 11.
"All of the crews of the above nam-
ed vessels, except one man lost from
the Pratt were rescued.
Schooner Edna Victim of Raid
"It appears that the schooner Edna,
which was found bottom side up sev-
eral days ago, and towed into Lewes,
Del., was also a victim of the sub-
marine. The crew of the Edna has
been landed in New York. The mast-
er of the Winneceonne, picked up the
crew of the Hettie Dunn."
Announce ictrola Winner
The Michigan Union has announc-
ed- that the Victrola given away at
the Carnival for the benefit of the
American Universities Union of Paris
has been awarded to number 847.

Spy Carries List of Oil Ships
New York, June 3.-Agents of the
military service brought from Croton,
New York, Saturday a German named
Hans Lentz, a former employee of the
Standard Oil company, in whose pos-
session they said were .found papers
taken from the files of the company
on which we're listed all the Standard
Oil ships, with those torpedoed check-
ed off.
-King George Wears Old Duds Now
London, June 3.-"I am having no
new clothes made during the war,"
remarked the king, when shown samp-
Ise of standard cloth from the old
royal mills at Dewbury, which are
turning out cheaper uniforms and
suits for everybody.
Former Instructors Now in Detroit
Major Joseph A. Bursley, former'
head of the University ordnance
training school, and Capt. E. P. White,
an instructor in the school, are now
in Detroit, in the production division
of the ordnance corps. They have of-
fices in the Book building.

* May Obtain Michiganensians
* Persons who have subscribed
* for the Michiganensian and have
* not received their books can ob-
* tain them from 2 to 4 o'clock
* every afternoon at room 1, Press
* building.
*
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Must Clear Lockers
Students holding lockers in Wa-
terman gymnasium are request-
ed by Dr. George A. May, physi-
cal director, to clear them before
June 10, in order that they may
be cleaned for the incoming
draft men and the summer ses-

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HILL
AUDITORIUM

FINAL CONCERT OF
Clee & eandolin Clubs

TOMORROW
35c

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I U 1

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