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July 21, 1927 - Image 3

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1927-07-21

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i

I H SUMMER: MICHIGAN DAILY.

PAGE

.......

THE UMME MICIGANDAIL _AG

BOOKS OF THE DAY

Summer may be vacation time for
most people, but if the summer plans
for the publishing houses are any in-
dication, it does not hold true of writ-
ers. Interesting things are being done
this summer in carious parts of the
country which will appear in the fall
list of new books:
Elizabeth Shepley Sergeant, author
of "Fire under the Andes" will soon
be working on a new novel at the
Macdowell Colony at Peterboro, N.
H. Katharine Anthony, author of
"Memoirs of Catherine the Great"
and Leonora Speyer, whose "Fiddler's
Farewell" was awarded the Pulitzer
Prize for poetry in 1926, are already
in Europe, working on 'new books.
Emory Halloway, author of "Whit-
man; An Interpretation in Narrative"
has retired to his shack at Meddy-I
bemps, Maine, where he is writing
industriously and fishing. Emily
Clark, whose southern sketches 1
"Stuffed Ueacocks" wil be brought in
the fall, is also in Europe hunting
for material.
WHITTER BYNNER' VISITS NEW
YORK
His long-promised book of Chinese
poems will really be published in
1928.
The twenty-fifth reunion of his class
at Harvard lured Witter Bynner from
his beloved New Mexico; now, he will
be in New York for several weeks.
Mr. Bynner has announced to his
publisher, Alfred A. Kopf, that his
book "The Jade Mountain," made up
of 311 Chinese poems, which has been
announced every year for five years,
will actually be ready in 1928, exact-
ly ten years after he began the trans-
lations. The obstacle in the way of,
early completion lay in the difficultyI
Mr. Bynner had in conferring with
his Chinese collaborator. 1VIr. Bynner
tells us that it is easy merely to trans-
pose Chinese poetry into English. He
'has tried to be faithful to the origi-G
nal Chinese 'both in form and text;
'and it is the polishing process which
has taken him ten years-not the
translation.
"TAMPICO" IS A GERMAN BEST-
SELLER
"Tampico," Joseph Hergesheimer's
latest novel, published in America by
Alfred A. Knopf, has just been addedt

to a German series entitled "Romane
der Welt" ("The World's Novels"),
edited by H. G. Scheffauer and Thoin-
as Mann, whose masterpiece, "The
Magic Mountain," was recently pub-
lished by Kopf. The German publish-
er of "Tampico" is Knaur, Berlin.
ONE OUT OF SEVENTY-EIGHT
George Jean Nathan, editor of "The
Theater of Today," a modern dramatic
library published by the house of
Knopf, announces that with the ex-
ception of Eugene O'Neill's "Strange
Interlude," which unfortunately is not
available, he has in the last three
months read seventy-eight as yet un-'
produced plays without finding one
worthy of publication in the series.
The seventy-eight plays were of
American, English, French, German,
and Austro-Hungarian origin. Mr.
Nathan's "Land of the Pilgrims'
Pride" will be published by Alfred A.
Knopf on. September 2nd.
NEW "SET" DEPICTED IN
"STARLING"
Christopher Ward's new novel,
"Starling," is possibly the only Ame-
rican novel which pictures the "pearl-
necklace gang" which goes in for fox-
hunting and which is not the typical
country-club set. There is a chapter
descriptive, in full detail, of the chase
and capture of a fox in the gran
nmanner, thoroughbred hunters, En-
glish hounds, trained huntsmen and
whips, pink coats, top hats, etc. Mr.
Ward lives in the center of fox-hunt-
ing, near Wilmington, and belongs to
a hunt club in his neighborhood.
OFFER PRIZE FOR MARK TWAIN
QUOTATIONS
The Mark Twain Association offers
a prize of fifty dollars for the ten
*
HALLERS
State Street
Jewelers

best quotations from Mark Twain's
books. The total count of words of
the ten quotations should not exceed
three hundred words. The contest
will close October 1, and the prize will
be given on Mark Twain's birthday,
November 30. No quotations nor
manuscripts will be returned. The
ten quotations awarded the prize will
be placed, with the winner's name, in
the Mark Twain Scrap Book which,
the association is forming. The ulti-
mate object of the association is theC
creating of a Mark Twain Professor-
ship of Humor and the 'Comic Spirit
in one of our universities. All com-
munications should be sent to Mrs.
Ida Benfey Judd, One West Sixty-
ninth Street, New York City.
COMMENTS ON OLIVE SCHREI-
NER'S NOVEL1
Fannie Hurst says of Olive Schrei-
ner's just published posthumous
novel: "What a noble book it is!
Every once in a'while a piece of work
comes along that gives one a brand]
new respect for the novel as a me-

dium. The* wide ocean of Olive
Schreiner's fine humanity and fine
wisdom flows unhampered through
the story."
Margaret Deland writes "It is really
tremendous: It violates, as far as I
can see, almost every canon of rec-
ognized construction in fiction. . .
All the same, I read every single
word in the soliloquy and in the let-
ter, and also in that awfully long, but
perfectly beautiful, talk to the child-
ren, 'Fireflies in the Dark.' Yes, I
think it a remarkable book."
11 1 AE
TODAY AND FRIDAY
JACK PICKFORD
In
"EXIT SMILING"
It's a Metro
Soon "The Waltz Dream".
This Ad. with 10c
'"=RAE ''

tb 'a i1WYlf1Y111 11

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IT DOWN and plan your vacation trip
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more than a vacation spent at home.
Last year thousands of students trav-
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this year will certainly show a further big increase in
bookings. For these ships are your ships, owned and
operated by the United States Government to give
you the highest standard of service demanded by
Americans. Clean, airy staterooms, inviting public
rooms, the best of food, exclusive deck space and
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Get all the facts now from your local steamship
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To all men whomaKe a
hobby of pipes

Qman.

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For every game and sport that requires ease,
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11111

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Delicious and Refreshing
~ C0
oldf
P O
These eys are six outstanding reasons
why everybody likes Coca-Cola. They
are being illustrated and presented in
Coca-Cola advertising -in The Saturday
Evening Post, Literary Digest, Collier's
Weekly, Liberty, and Life; in many news-
papers; in posters, walls, bulletins and
outdoor signs; in show window and soda
fountain and refreshment stand decora-
tions.
Key No. 1 was presented last month. Keys No.2
and No. 3 will be presented this month. Keys
No. 4 and No. 5 will be presented in July, and
Key No. 6 will be presented in August.
Keep your eyes open to Coca-Cola advertising and
win a cash prize. College men ought to win.

MAYBE you've spent half your life and
fortune on this old hobby-collecting
everything from peace-pipes down to the
latest "L and Maria" underslung. Maybe
you know the pipe encyclopedia from
amber Americanus to Zula zuago.
But if you're a pipe smoker, you learned
long ago that no matter how much a
man may know about trick pipes and
pipe tricks what he gets out of any pipe
depends on what he puts in it.
And if you know your tobaccos, you
know that any pipe's a sweeter smoke
when packed with grand and glorious
old Granger Rough Cut... The finest
Burley that grows, mellowed Wellman's
way and specially cut for pipes. .
A man may have a hundred pipes but
he needs only one tobacco... and that's
Granger. For whether you put it in a
meerschaum or a corn-cob, Granger is al-
ways the same cool, sweet tobacco..
worthy of any pipe in the world.
GIRANGEk
ROUGH CUT

A
V

-_t

1;

SLIES

Iif~

The Coca-cola Co., Atlanta, Ga.

Granger Rough Cut is made by the Liggett & M

111,01,11,11im A . 0., 0

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