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July 21, 1927 - Image 1

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Michigan Daily, 1927-07-21

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TODAY'S EVENTS
8: 0 P. M.-bast perform-
a ces of "Pigs." by the
Rockford Players.

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4:Iai1ti

MEMBER
ASSOSED

x4

'OL. VIII, No. 22

! _.

ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN, THURSDAY, JULY 21, 1927

PRICE FIVE CENTS

THIEME MAKES SPEECH
ON MLLET, THE MAN,
HIS ART AND MESSAGE
SAYS THAT ARTIST EXPRESSED
PHILOSOPHY OF HIS RACE
IN HIS PAINTINGI

HAYNES GIVES EXPLANATION FOR

LECTURE IS ILLUSTRATED
French iProfessor Tells Of Struggle
Of Famous Painter To Master
Obstacles In His Path
"Every genius, consciously or un-
consciously, expresses in his work the
aspirations, ideals, and essential
characteristics of the race or people
*hich he represents. Millet, a true
genius, was a greater philosopher
than a pictorial artist." In this man-
ner Professor Hugo P. Thieme, of the
Freich departient, characterized the
subject of his illustrated lecture,
"Jean Francois Millet: The Man, His
Art, and His Message," which was de-
livered yesterday afternoon in Natu-
ral Sience auditorium.
"You take away the veil from Mil-
let's paintings," continued the pro-
fessor, "and you will find humanity
and work expressed. He was the
herald of the dignity of work, and he
showed every peasant that he paint-
ed with a soul."
Professor Thieme traced Millet's
life from his birth onward, telling of
hw, as a poor peasant, his capacity
as a sketcher of rural scenes was
greatly admired by his fellows, and
of how he studied at Paris and other
prominent art centers.. He set up
himself independently in 1739; but
the French art of that time was not
JIn his field and he had trobule, and
financial difficulties constantly beset
him. After his marriage, which oc-
curred. about this time, he moved
from the city and began his more
original and pastoral works. During
his youth, the professor stated, Mil-
let read much, including parts of
Shakespeare, Byron, Scoft, Homer,
Goethe, and also "The Lives of the
Saints."
Dr. Thieme showed slides of nume-!
rous paintings of the sixteenth and
seventeenth centuries, and also many
of Millet's paintings including the fa-
mous "Gleaners" and "Angelus."
TRANSOCEANIC FLIGHT
DELAYED TEMPORARILY
Courtney Uostpones Hopoff Because
Of Failure Of Radio To
Work Properly
MARCONI EXPERTS CALLED
(By Associated Press)
CALSHOT, Fng., July 20.-Failure
of-the wireless apparatus to function
properly in a last-minute test flight,
caused Capt. F. T. Courtney, noted
British airman, to postpone the start
of his trans-Atlantic flight to New
York, set for this morning.
The pilot took his flying boat, the
"Whale," into the air in rainy weath-
er at about 7,:30.this morning to test
the engines and make a thorough try-
out of the radio outfit. The motors
functioned perfectly, but on alighting
it was -learned that the wireless failed
to respond to all the calls made on
it.
After consulting with Navigator
Downer and Engineer Little, who are
to accompany him, and with his
business manager, Courtney announc-
ed he would postpone the flight until
Thursday, when he hopes to hop off
at dawn.
Marconi experts immediately set to
work on the instruments to remedy
the defects and othe experts took ad-
vantage of the postponement to make

several small adjustments to the
Whale's controls under the superin-
tendence of Courtney, who announced
he wouldi stay by the machine
throughout the day.
Courtney was at Calshot Field,
eight miles south of Southampton, at
dawn, all set for the 400-mile hop to
Valentia, Ireland, where he was to re-
fuel and start this afternoon for New-

ANTAGONISM OF
TOWARDS UNIVE
t.Many patients come to the Univer-
sity of Michigan hospital here with-
out the advice or understanding of
their home physicians, according to
a statement of Dr. H. A. Haynes in a
paragraph of his annual report deal-
ing with service to the people of the
state. This begets the ill will of3
the home physician, the director
points out.
"The University is doing a tre-
mendously worth-while service to the
people of Michigan," Dr. Haynes says.
"It may be, however, that through
certain changes much greater and
more lasting service may be iend-
ered.. Aside from the patients sent
through the county and other agen-
cies, many come without the under-
standing or knowledge of their home
physicians, and very often obtain our
professional service in a way that is
not considered ethical among well-
regulated practicing physicians."
No doctor in good standing will ac-
cept the patient of other physicians
until such a patient has properly and
regularly discharged his last attend- I
ant, Dr. Haynes says.
"We, however, are doing this daily,"
he states, "and often the first intima-
tion that the doctor receives of the
discontinuance of his services isI
throughaneighborhood gossipsto the
effect that his former patient is in thel

STATE DOCTORS
RSITY HOSPITAL
University hospital. The doctor
would be more than human if he did
not make us joint recipient of his
resentment. We may point out that
we had no share in the patient's de-
cision, that this is a state institu-
tion and as such open to all, and so
forth, but the fact remains that the
doctor is resentful and antagonistic
in many cases. By antagonizing the
doctor we not only lose the opportuni-
ty of seeing and serving many of his
patients who sadly need the service
we are here to render, but his alinea-
tion prevents our helping to keep him
in touch with the ever-changing fron-
tiers of medical advance.I
"It might be advisable to have all
services opened to private patients,
provided they are referred to the hos-
pital by their home physician. The
fee charged would be based upon the
advice of the referring physician re-
garding the amount the patient is
able to pay. The plan, which is being
carried out at the Universities of
Iowa, Minnesota, Stanford Universi-
ty and at the Pete Bent Brigham hos-
pital, or some modification, might offer
suggestions which would be helpful
here. The plan of the four hospitals
is to allow office room to outstanding
physicians on a part time basis, the
physicians charging fees for certain
patients and the hospitals charging
for room and care.

BOTH HEAVYWEIGHTS
CERTAIN OF VICTORY
IN APPROACH ING BOUT
SHARKEY WILL ENTER BATTLE
WITHOUT PLANS; HAS
ENDED TRAINING
PUGILISTS IN FINE FORM
Gate Receipts Expected To Reach
Greatest Amount For Any Non.
Championship Fight
(By Associated Press)j
NEW YORK, July 20.-His hard
work all behind him, Jack Sharkey
was more confident than ever today
that he would beat Jack Dempsey in
their 15-round bout tomorrow night
at the Yankee Stadium, leading to a
championship battle with Gene Tun-
ney.
"I want to see what Dempsey will
do when I sock him on the jaw."
That was one of the Bostonian's first
remarks after he had laid away his
gloves, following his final workout
yesterday, and hurried to his dressing
room for a rub down.
Not the faintest of doubts crept into
the ex-sailor's speech.
"I'll beat him. I'm bigger than I
ever was. I'm stronger. I'm hitting
harder. I always could hit when I
wanted to, so I have no fear of Demp- I
sey's hitting," he said.
Yesterday's final workout in the
Sharkey camp indicates that the Bos- f
tonian expects to carry on a defen-
sive battle at the outset.j
Tex Rickard announced today that
the advance sale of tickets had reach-I
ed the $900,000 mark. Tomorrow
night's show is expected to draw ap-
proximately $1,250,000, the largest!
gate for any nonichampionship fight
in history.
Ringside seats, with a boxoffice
price of $27.50, were reported being
offered along Broadway today at $125
each.
Typical "Rickard weather" is fore-l
cast for tomorrow night.
SARATOGA LAKE, N. Y., July 20.1
-The calm confidence of the manI
physically and mentally tuned to per-
feption gripped Jack Dempsey today
as the once great czar of the heavy-
weight division hung up his trainingj
gloves-perhaps forever..
Behind the most powerful man
modern ring history has known, lay
three months of toil in the Ventura

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King Ferdinand And
Father Of New King

PRESENT
ED TO

GOVERNMENT IS OPPOS.
RETURN OF PRINCE
CAROL

KING FERDINAND DEAD;
SIX YEAR OLD BOY IS,
NOW ROUMANIAN KING

BURIAL WILL BE SATURDAY
Army Will Take Oath Of Alegience
To New King Amusement Places
Will Remain Clcied
(By Associated, Press)
BUCHAREST, Roumania, July 20.--
Ferdinand the Just, first king ot
Greater Roumania, died at 2:15
o'clock this morning. Prince Michel,

NEXT ECURSION WILL
~VISIT LARGE OFFIS
OBJECTIVES OF EXPEDITION ARE
GENERAL MOTORS BUILDING
AND STATLER HOTEL
TO TAKE PLACE SATURDAY
An unusual opportunity to see the
many sided activities connected with
the operation of large metropolitan
buildings will be offered on the ex-
cursion, leaving at 8:40 a. m., Sat-
urday, July 23, from in front of the
Michigan Union, to the General Mo-
'tors building and the Statler Hotel in
Detroit, announces C leton F. Wells,
director of excursion .
The General Motor building, one of
the objectives of the tour, is one of
the largest office buildings, o fits kind
in the world; -it was built to house1
the offices of the General Motors
Company and its allied organizations.
The office building itself is fifteen
stories in hegiht and contains the
show rooms of the various General]
Motors' Companies, rooms for bowl-
ing and billiards, a cafeteria, a din-
ing room, the executive offices of the
company, an auditorium, and swim-
ming pools. Besides the big main
biilding there is the laboratory in
wich the research work of the Gene-
ral Motors company is carried on,
there is also an exposition hall, in
which are facilities for exhibiting
goods and for holding conventions.
The Hotel Statler, the other objec-
tive of. the excursion, is one of the
largest hotels in Detroit. The hotel
was built in 1915 and forms one link
of the large chain of Statler hotels
extending all over the country.
CRAIG TO DELIVER
TALKS ON FORESTS
"The Business of Conducting Our
National Forests" is the title of the il-
lustrated -lecture to be delivered by
Professor Robert C. Craig, Jr., of the
Forestry department, at 5 o'lock this
afternoon- in. Natural Science audi-
torium.
BASEBALL SCORES
.Americanaeague
Washington, 5; Chicago, 3.
National League
Chicago, 4; New York, 5
St. Louis, 1-3; Brooklyn, 2-1.
Pittsburgh, 6-3; Philadelphia, 5-4.
Cincinnati, 4-1; Boston, 2-2.
The Weather
(By Associated Press)
-Indicates that it will be fair to-
day, without much changes in ten-

I CHILD AS POET IS-
SUBJECT OF TALK
"All the child needs is a sympa-
thetic understanding from teachers
and parents in order to develop his
creative powers," according to Miss
Helen Martin, instructor in library
work with children at Western Re-'
serve University, who spoke Tuesday
night before the Women's Education
f club. In discussing "The Child as
Poet," Miss Martin emphasized the
fact that the child with the poetic in-
stiunct should be made to think of po-
etry as an everyday expression of his
innermost thoughts, and that every
effort should be made to keep the
child natural. Miss Martin expressed
the hope that publishing of children's,
poetry would not become a fad, as
such a condition would tend to ruin
public appreciation of the really fine
child poetry when it did appear. S
THINKS SANDINO'S1
CAREER FINISHED I

not yet six years old, under the tute-
lage of the regency, is ruler of the
largest Balkan nation.
The regents, Pince Nicholas, Pat-
riarch Cristea and Sureme court Jus-
tice Bucbudan, were officially .sworn
in before the National assembly at 4
o'clock this afternoon. Members of
the house cheered long and loud' the
t*. ...Sflt -.- fae A a child king Michel, who, accompanied
by his-mother, wife of former Prince
Carol and a princess of Greece, sat
-.:stolidly at attention throughout the
ceremony.
Prince Carol, now at Neuilly, near
Paris, who abandoned all hope of the
a-one by his renunciation, January
4, 1926, has announced his intention
of not returning to Bucharest.
Ronel Bratiano, former premier and
"strongman" of Roumania, holds the
power with the help of Queen Marie.
It is expected that he will unques-
tionably be a dominatig figure over
his regency.
King Ferdinand died as he had live6,
fighting stubbornly with chhracteris-
tic Hohenzollern tenacity.
"I feel so tired," he said to Quee i
Marie, who held him in het arms in i.s
r dying moments, and then his last
words, "I feel no pain."
The king's funeral will take' plac
4j># Saturday. This was decided on iby
the council of the regency, which will
i attend to matters of state until PrincY
' Michel obtains his majority; which by
"-"7"1 NICE CAW" the Roumanian constitution is LS
years of age.
IMMEDIA TE HELP The army will take the oath of fidel-
ity to the new king, and all places of
URGED BY HOOVER amusement in Bucharest have beei
(By Associated Press) f ordered to remain clsoed until, fur--
ther notice. All meetings have beeit
RAPID CITY, S. D., July 20.-Im-
mdaefdaa 'i.t.i.s.pforgidden and a censorship has been
mediate federal aid in the Mississippi placed on the press.
flood relief problem was urged upon

Mountains of aliforni and three weeks
(By Associated .Press) of grim battling here to rebuild the
WASHINGTON, July 20.-General splendid two-fisted fighting machine'
Sandino, who lost many of his fol- that once ruled the world. Ahead of
lowers in the battle with American the 32-year-old warrior loomed the'
marines at Ocopal, Nicaragua, pro- most dramatic night of his career-
bably never will be heard from again, the night when he must win or quit
in the opinion.of Rear Admiral Julian the game he loves.
L. Latimer, who commanded the spe- "I am ready," Dempsey said today,
cial service squadron in Nicaraguan "as ready as at any time in my life.
waters during the civil war there. If I lose there will be no alibi, no
Admiral Latimer, who is in .this , second comeback, and I quit forever
country on leave after visiting his the game I love. 'I never have made
daughter in Panama, called on Secre- an excuse before and I won't start
tary Wilbur today, and in a later con- now. But put it down in the book-
ference with newspaper men talked I'll lick that E~harkey kid in just two
freely upon conditions in Nicaragua. punches."
PALMER CHRISTIAN RECITAL I

By Miriam Mitchell

Palmer Christian's organ recital last
night was one of his best performan-I
ices. The Prelude, by Corelli (1653-
1713) was transcribed for organ by
Guilmant. The strains of a violin are
heard in the right hand solo. Cler-
ambault's Prelude introduces several
orchestral instruments, and is one of
that conductor's best organ composi-
tion. The Prelude and Fugue in G
minor by Bach is rich in the majes-
tic solemnity and dignity that charac-
terizes Bach. The Prelude is grip-
ping in its many themes and varia-
tions, while the Fugue forms a dis-
tinct ,contrast and calls for quick
pedal action.
Nocturne, by the 9merican musi-
cian, DeLarnarter, is exquisite in its]
sweetness compared to the heavier!
tones of Bach. His Fountain is de-
lightful in its light touches, and
rythmical, wistful measures. The
Fountain and Legend are from a Suite
dedicated to Mr. Christian by De-,
Lamarter.1
In Elgar's Sonata in G we find a

contemporary composers. The Al-
legro maestoso presents variety of.
movements, with a recurrence of the
first theme, while the Andante expres-
sivo is soothing in its peaceful quiet.
Elgar's Sonata is indeed a great mas-1
ter-piece.
Minuetta antico e Musetta, by the
Italian composer Yon, is light and
airy, with a picturesque insertion of
the Musetta in the middle s'ection
of the composition. In his Improvi-
sation of "Drink to Me Only With
Thine Eyes," Mr. Christian presented
a number which appealed greatly to
his appreciative audience. The many
variations, the chimes, the vox hu-
mana, all combined to bring the old
melody back in all the beauty of its
associations.
The last composition, Rhapsody
Catalane, by Bonnet, evidenced its
distinctly Spanish influence, the ped-
al cadenza playing an important part.
The entire recital was particularlyl
interesting and of a high tone, and Mr.
Christian gave a remarkable presen-
tation of some immortal master-

President Coolidge today by Secre-
tary Hoover who has sepervised res-
cue and rehabilitation work in the
devasted area.
Mr. Hoover told the President that
state legislatures are unable to raise
sufficient funds to carry on the im-
perative work of closing the levees.
Furthermore, he said, local communi-
ties cannot bear the burden of taxes
falling due on the levee bonds because
it has been possible only to restore
about 2,000,000 of the 3,500,000 acres
covered by the flood to crops this,
year.
Without mentioning a special ses-
sion of Congress which is under con-
sideration by Mr. Coolidge, the secre-
tary did recommend that the govern-
ment go to the immediate relief ofI
the levee program, insisiting that itf
was necessary to have these closed
before fall.
Funds, he thought, could e obtain-
ed from government money and land,l
including the rivers and harbors ap-
propriation.
So far as caring for the flood, vic-
tims is concerned, Mr. Hoover de-f
clared, there would be $3,000,0001
from relief contributions on Novem-1
ber 1, and he was confident that they
could- be taken care of until Con-
gress meets in regular session in De-
cember.
SUMMER DIRECTORIES
AVAILABLE
Acording to an announcement made
by T. D. Olmsted, '27, publisher of the
Summer Directory, a few copies of the'
directory may still be obtained at the
book stores. These were left over
from the general campus sale and
have been distributed to all the book
stores where they may be had at the
reular price.

The Bratiano government holds the
country in an iron hand. Publht
buildings and strategical }points are
occupied by soldiers and the govern-
ment is resolved that the decree of
January 4, 1926, expelling Carol and
instituting a regency in the event of
Ferdinand's death must be fulfilled.
The present government is unalter-
ably opposed to the return of Carol
to the Roumanian soil, even to attend
the funeral of his father.
The body of the king will be laid
to rest in the mausoleum of Curator
DeArgues, where King Carol and
Queen Elizabeth rest.sUntil Saturday
the body will lie in state ,gn the cas-
tle of Coltroceni.
HANFORD TO HEAD
ENGLISH COURSES
Graduate students in the English
department of the University will be
under* the direct supervision of Prof.
H. H. Hanford beginning this fall.
Professor Hanford, who will be in
charge of all graduate work in Eng-
lish, will assign the students to their
different pro-seminaries, and will con-
sult with them at regular intervals
concerning their work.
All graduates working for. their
Masker's degrees will take pro-seminar
courses from the professors who have
charge f-of the seminars. Courses
other than the pro-seminars will be
such as will coordinate with'them.
Candidates for doctor's degrees will
take regular seminar courses corres-
ponding to the pro-seminars. The
graduate students will be more highly
systematized than previously, and a
new course entitled "Studies in the
rise and development of English
classicism," under Prof. L. I. Bred-
vold, will be given in addition to the
regular graduate English courses.

beauty almost unexcelled by other'!pieces.

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