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July 02, 1927 - Image 2

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Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1927-07-02

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L Two

THE SUMMER MICHIGAN DAILY

SATURDAY, JULY 2,, 1927

Q74fTm$u er
Published every morning except Monday
during the University Summer Session by
1he Board in Control of Student Publica-
tions.
The Associated Press is exclusively en-
titled to the use for republication of all news
dispatches credited to it or not otherwise
credited in this paper and the local news pub-
lished herein.
Entered at the Ann Arbor, Michigan,t
postoffice as second class matter.
Subscription by carrier, $1.so; by mail,3
Offices: Press Building, Maynard Street,
Ann Arbor, Michigan.
EDITORIAL STAFF
Telephone 4925
MANAGING EDITOR
PHILIP C. BROODS
Editorial Director......Paul J. Kern
City Editor.....Joseph E. Brunswick
Feature Editor.....Marian L. Welles
Night Editors
Carlton G. ChampeH. K. Oakes, Jr.
John E. Davis Orville Dowzer
T. E. Sunderland
Reporters
E. M. Hyman Miriam Mitchell
Mary Lister
Robert E. Carson Betty Pulver
Wm. K. Lomason Louis R. Markus
BUSINESS STAFF
Telephone 21214
1ASINESS MANAGER
LAUJRANCE J. VAN TUYL
Advertising.............Ray Wachter
Accounts ........... John Ruswinckel
Circulation.............,Ralph Miller
Assistants

GOOD LUCK, BALLOON
It is interesting to note that at times
the University shows interest in some-

a--- I I M., MWWNMWA

C. T. Antonopulos
G. W. Platt

S. S. Berar

Night Editor-JOHN E. DAVIS
SATURDAY, JULY 2, 1927
T THEY'RE PRETTY ANYWAY
Recently Ann Arbor has become a
metropolitan community and installed
traffic lights at all the main intersec-
tions. Some of these signals do noble
service, and on Main street at least,;
after an experimental period of sev-
eral years, they have become so ad-
justed that one can traverse the whole
length of the thoroughfare without
once stopping. This efficiency is a
tribute"to the ability of the city gov-
ernment.
Lately, due to the unprecedented
success of the pretty green and red,
lights, they have been installed at two
minor street intersections, where they
do equally noteworthy service. Both
of the intersections are bad crossings,'
and the traffic signals are a very
sound idea, but the thoughtful opera-
tors of them, seeking no doubt to save
wear on the switches, have made the
period of alternation so long that a
serious accident is likely to occur
'anyway.

thing scientific, and though we have
left the Western Conference to do it,
and are disregarding the rules govern-
ing professional athletics, nevertheless
I the school should feel proud to be rep-
resented in a balloon race. Of late
the science of aeronautics has dra'wn
up on an even plane with intercolle-
giate football in the regard of the gen-
eral public, and it is encouraging in-
deed that the University should be a
pioneer in this enterprise.
Next Monday the annual Detroit
News trophy balloon race will leave
the Ford airport at Dearborn, and
numbered among the six contestants
will be one from the department of
aeronautical engineering at the Uni-
versity.- There will be no cheering
mobs in the grandstand, and the band
will not be there to play the Victors,
but in spite of this the entrance of the
University into scientific competitions
is somewhat of a laudable innovation,
and the pilot of the yellow and blue
gas bag will have the best wishes of
Michigan with him just as any other
of the competitorsrepresenting our
school have had the best wishes of
Michigan;-so Good Luck, Balloon,
and may the winds blow long and
hard.
AMERICA FALLS
For years the tennis laurels of the
United States have rested on the aging
shoulders of Big Bill Tilden. The
policy was a sound and wise one, for
until the past two years the giant
racket wielder has been invincible in
inernational competition, and time
after time invaders have gone home
discouraged, and then Tilden has fol-
lowed them home to add insult to in-
jury by beating them in their home
lands.
The champion has fallen, however,
and the stars and stripes no longer
ride triumphant from the top of every
international tenis touranment's
flagstaff. Twice within a month Big
Bill has been swept down to defeat-
and the result, as is inevitable, is that
the United States is swept down to de-
feat with him.
Rene LaCoste, brilliant French-star,
and Henri Cochet, another French-
man, are the two men who have re-
moved Tilden from the pinnacle, and
were it not for our women stars,
which after all are a shallow recom-
pense, we might as well withdraw
from the major tournaments.
There is no need to become immedi-
ately discouraged, however. Perhaps
Tilden will recover and repulse the
Davis cup invaders when they arrive,
and perhaps the fall of the champion
will be the incentive to some younger
stars to develop. One thing, however,
is certain, and that is that the period
of unbroken tennis supremacy by Wil-
liam Tilden is gone, and that America
must begin to pin its hopes in the
younger players if it hopes to retain
its present superiority.
BORAH FOR P{ESIDENT

* * *
SUMMER SCHOOL WILL CLOSE
BECAUSE OF HEAT
Official announcement was made
yesterday at the Office of the Dean
that if the heat wave continues the
classes in the summer session will not
meet Tuesday morning. Classes will
be continued an extra week in
August, however, to make up for it.
(At a late hour last night it could
not be learned whether it was the
Dean or the head of the coaching
school who had made the announce-
ment. It is authoritative either way,
however.)
* * *
POETRY IN ROLLS COLUMN
BANNED BY REGENTS
The Board of Regents, at its last
meeting, !decided that poetry and all
attempts at it would have to be
banned from the Rolls column ex-
cept in exceptional and extraordinary
cases at theediscretion of the Dean of
Students. The action comes as tht
result of an effort to curb student fa-
talities.
* * *
TIMES NEWS LAUDS ATHLETIC
ASSOCIATION
Says Tillotsen and Yost Will Be Able
To Sleep Nights.
The Ann Arbor Times News, Amer-
ica's second best newspaper, has of-
ficially announced that Harry (Big-
hearted) Tillotson and Coach Fielding
H. Yost, sometimes known as "Hur-
ry Up,", will be able to sleep nights
now that the ticket distribution plan
is settled.
"Dear Harry would like to get 5000-
00000000 persons in 70,00 seats,"
says the metropolitan journal, "But
it can't be done." (This statement is
made after a complete investigation
by the Times News Staff Eigineer.)
Harry's many friends and relatives
will be glad to know that he is
again able to sleep., It is expected
that he will continue this enterprise
until after the student ticketsare dis-
tributed next fall, as he has in the
past.
ATHLETIC ASSOCIATION WILL
CHARGE FEE FOR LOOKING
AT NEW STADIUM
Beginning today a smaEl fee will be
charged for all students looking at
the' new stadium.
"The cost of providing this specta-
cle is considerable, Coach Yost de-
elared4 "And) the summer students
pay no blanket tax to cover the
charges. For this reason a uoaninial
tee will have to be charged. The ten-
nis courts are already operating n-
der this arrangement."
* * *
AN APOLOGY TO
WHOM IT BELONGS
The University golf course does not
belong to the University, but is a pri-
vate enterprise. That is the reason
the fees are charged. If it belonged
to the Athletic Association the author-
ities there would gladly open it to the
students free of charge, this is shown
by their liberal offer of only charging
$1.50 for the use of the tennis courts
TODAY'S WANT AD
FOR SALE-&Several utomobjles.
apply anywhee. These cars have
been treated as members of the family
by the students who owned them.--
(Adv.)
SEVERAL SCHOOL TEACHERS
ENROLL IN SUMMER SESSION

It is reported at the 'office of the
Registrar that several school teach-
ers have enrolled as students in the
summer session. This unprecedented
condition is accounted for by the fact
that the removal of immorality
through the abolition of student cars
makes Michigan a safe place even for
school teachers.
Relief was voiced in several quar.
ters at the announcement, because it
is rumored that the school teachers
can be depended upon to do all the
reciting in the classes this summer,
and though it is a strain listening to
them, it saves preparing the assign.
ments.
As a special feature Rolls will run
interviews with some of the species,
if any can be located, later in thef
summer. Moreover, if this continues
as a humor column several of their
theses will be printed in full.
Kernel.

hhUL
TODAY
IS
SATURDAY

Sta~te Street
Jewelers

A
TYPEWRITING
SHORTHAND
BOOKKEEPING
Morning Class
Now Forming.
Individual Instruction.
HAMILTON
BUSINESS COLLEGE
State and WillIam Sts.

DRUGS RODAKS
-r 1 -
I**:.-,. -l " il Io ' ra^I.l' * '. - b ~ *-
Kodak the Children with Ea tman Film
You can depend 'on yellow-box Kodak Filn for good negatives
every time. And your negatives make good pictures if we (10 the
Kodaks, $5 up; Brownies, $2 up.
Calkis-Fletcher Drug Co.
Tlu'ee Dependable Stores
We Ilave served Michigan and her students
CA SY SOI)AS

Subscribe for the Summer aily

READ TmHE WANT ADS

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0

One can become used to waiting a
long time for them to change, but
when it becomes a matter of a whole
a afternoon or evening, that is a differ-
ent thing. The light on the corner of
South University avenue and Church
street is the worst offender in this
regard, and several accidents have
narrowly been averted when the
drivers of cars have fallen asleep
waiting for the red signal to change.
Recently there was a case of one
driver who telephoned ahead from
Ypsilanti, and when he found that the
signal had just changed to allow traf-
fic to pass through on South Univer-
sity avenue he hurried here, drove
down South University avenue under
the same green light, ate dinner at the
Union and drove back, reaching the
light just as it was changing.
This case may be extreme, but if
space permitted literally scores of
such instances could be enumerated.
When automobiles are banned next
fall the horses may die of old age
waiting for the signals to change, and
the overhead or underground expense
that this would incur would be pro-
4iibitive to the average student. Of
course The Daily, by co-operating
somewhat, could alleviate the situa-
tion if it would print every morning
the position of the light for the day
with the weather report, biit this
would occupy valuable space that can
better be used advertising the Rock-
ford players.
To be serious, however, the period
of alternation on the signal light at
the corner of South University avenue
and Church street is far too long for a
corner with as little traffic as that;
and a comparatively rapid change,
every twenty seconds or so, would be
far more convenient. The light is vis-
ible for a long ways in each direction,
and the autoists would have ample
time to apply their brakes. It is to be
hoped that it will not take the city
authorities as many years to remedy1
this as it did to properly adjust the9
Main street system
While on the subject of signal
lights, also, it may not be amiss to
propose one for the corner of Libertyt
and State streets and No'th Univer-
sity avenue and State streets.J

It is nearly time that every prospec-
tive candidate for the presidential
nomination next summer begin saying
something foolish or sensational in
order to get himself in the limelight.
Al Smith started last spring, but was
unable to keep it up. Senator James
Reed couldn't help himself when he
became implicated in the Senate slush
fund investigation and the Ford libel
suit, and now Senator Borah of Idaho
has begun to say things, though not so
foolish (because he is a Republican).
It is not at all unusual for the fiery
western Senator to make a speech,
but when he commits himself on so
many things at one time as he did at
Denver it is significant, and extremely
so. Besides the usual plea for the con-
servation of our natural resources,
which every candidate must make
whether he means it or not, Senator
Borah has come out flatly against the
cancellation of foreign debts and the
development of our foreign markets.
Foreign debt cancellation, he says,
would only enable the European coun-
tries to keep even larger armies, and
the armies there are large enough al-
ready. As regards our natural re-
souces, the Idaho senator, who does
not depend on Wall street for his
campaign funds, holds that if unrea-
sonable prices are charged by private
owners, and if exploitation continues,
the only alternative will be govern-
ment ownership.
Even though Senatoir William
Borah is not a regular Republican,
and in spite of the fact that he dis-
agrees with President Coolidge on a
number of things; one can not help
but admire the consistent clear think-
ing and honest judgment of this man 1
who is so obviously not a damogogue.
It is refreshing in these days of slush
funds, and "keep" legislators, to find
someone wiho even dares advocatef
government ownership-in a mildt
form, to be sure--and if the Americant

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The Droo0ping Hat
A Feature

r wr

There is something particularly alluring about the drooped hats of this season.
They shade the face in a fascinating manner, and at the sane time frame its contour
in sofe lines. At Mack's you may purch ase your hat, in your own personality color,
at a moderate price. If you already pos sess a large hat there are many. others to
choose from-every size--every color, in straw and silk.

$298

ALL $5.00 HATS REDUCED
All the silk and straw $5 htashave been reduced for
the mid-season. Hats of every color to match any frock.
ALL $7.50 HATS REDUCED
All the $7.50 hats are also reduced which are either
silk or straw. You will enjoy selecting yuor own hat from
this lovely collection.

X5.OO

Besides these two q)ecials, all the $10.00 hats have
even more important, the French room hats are reduced
means a reduction from $22.50 in some cases. Because
have an extravagant hat for a moderate price.
(SECOND FLOOR)

been reduced to $7.50, and
to $10.00. The latter price
of these specials you may

people are hunting a president who is
fearless and honest, even though mis-
taken at times, they could do no bet-
ter than electing Senator Borah.

ca," y;
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