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August 12, 1927 - Image 1

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Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1927-08-12

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ONLY TWO ILORE ISSUES
OF THE SUMMER DAILY

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4:1Iatl,

MEMBER
ASSOCIATED
PRESS

-1

VOL. VIII, No. 41

ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN, FRIDAY, AUGUST 12, 1927

PRICE FIVE CENTS

_HAWAIIFFICIALS VETO
POSTPONING FLIGHT;
DERBY 'ON'_TOMORROW
SAN FRANCISCO THINKS MORE
TIME IS NEEDED FOR
QUALIFICATIONS
SECOND PLANE CRASHES
Triplane Wrecked Beyond Repair
When It Nosedives Into Shallow
Water Of 'Frisco Bay
(By Associated Press)
AIRPORT, OAKLAND, Cal., Aug.
11.-The first great aerial derby, over
a course across the Pacific ocean
from San Francisco bay to the is-
land of Oahu, 2,400 miles away, of-
ficially will be "on" at noon tomor-
row.
The Honolulu committee of the
events late today vetoed an eleventh
hour postponement of two weeks
recommended by San Francisco of-
ficials of the flight who believed the
planes and their crews were not yet
properly equipped or qualified.
Climaxing a day in which another
plane in the flight barely escaped1
disaster similar to the crash which
killed two fliers yesterday, the de-
cision at Honolulu left in doubt only
which of the planes at the starting
line would take off at noon tomorrow.
Nine pilots and their crews were 1
at the airport tonight, waitiig com-
pletion of navigation tests and in-
spection of their craft which continu-
ed under the supervision of federala
inspectors until nightfall. At dawn
tomorrow inspection will be resumedf
and the actual approval entrants are I
expected to be announced at 10 a. m. a
Today's crash in which the threec
members of the crew of the twin-
motored triplane, "Spirit of Los An-
geles," were precipitated into the
waters of San Francisco bay, occurred
when something went wrong with the
plane as pilot James L. Giffin reached1
the runway for a landing. The planeg
swerved to the left, and, sensing thew
danger, Giffin went upward and nose-w
dived into shallow water.B
C
SAN FRANCISCO, Aug. 11.-Post- 0
ponement of Friday's $35,000 Dole C
flight from San Francisco bay to
Honolulu because the entries whop
have thus far presented themselves t
"are not now properly equipped or i
qualified" was ordered today by the ,v
flight committee and the department o
of commerce subject to the approval m
of the Honolulu chapter of the Na- t
tional Aeronautic association. A
Contradicted Decision E
The committee announced its de- W
cision to the Associated Press after W
a meeting which lasted well into the
early hours of the morning. D
The following statement was given s
out: p
"The starting committee of the t
Dole Honolulu flight, upon the rec-
ommendation of Lieut. B. H. Wyatt,
an experienced navigator, Clarence
M. Young, director of aeronautics,
department of commerce; Maj. H. D.
Claggett, a member of the committee; n
Valentine Gephart, secretary of the t
National Aeronautic association; Capt. h
C. W. Saunders, chairman of the o
starting committee of the Dole flight, m
and H. E. Macconaughey, represen- M

tative of Mr. James Dole, concluded to N
recommend the postponement of the th
start of the flight a period not ex- r
ceeding two weeks.t
"A request for authority from Mr. R
Dole and the Honolulu chapter of the,
Aeronautic association to make the Id
postponement effective was cabled to iy
Honolulu last night.1a

Student Applicant
For Work Show Wid'
Range Of Vocation
Following the return of Mrs. Ma
L. Stewart, director, the Universil
student employment -bureau is mal
irg plans for the opening of the fa
semester. Many students have wri
ten to Mrs. Stewart already inquirin
about the prospects for work, an
they indicate that there will be di
versified experience available. F
this reason Mrs. Stewart expects to b
abl'e to take care of practically al
sorts of requests for experience
help.
Many of the men whom the employ
ment bureau has placed have hel
their positions throughout their fou
years in the University, according t
Mrs. Stewart, and this can be take
as an indication that most of them
are consistent and reliable workers
she said.
It is estimated that more than 3,000
or about forty per cent of the men
inthe University work for at leas
a part of thei rexpenses. Abouta
half of these, she believes, obtain
employment through the Universit
office, the others either continuing in
positions they held in years previous;
or finding work through friends o0
fraternity connections.
This is not to be taken as a sign
that only freshmen or unaffiliated
students are available at that office
however, for Mrs. Stewart fills re-
quests for people with advanced ex-
perience in such special fields as
chemistry, draughtsmanship, and even
astronomical observatory work.
The majority of the men applying
for work want jobs which will pay
their board, or room and board, butt
a large number of them work for
cash on miscellaneous jobs.
CHICAGO PROBLEM
DISCUSSED BEFORE
COMMITTEE HERE
Problems encountered in the reor-
ganization of the first two years of
work at the University of Chicago
were discussed by Dean Chauncey S.
Boucher, '09, of the literary college
f that university, before the Senate
pecial Committee on the University
Jollege, Tuesday.
This committee is preparing a re-
ort for President Clarence Cook Lit-
le on the procedure to be followed
n working on the problem of the Uni-
'ersity College next year. It consists
f Prof. Clarence S. Yoakum, chair-
nan, registrar; Ira J. S'mitih, secre-
ary; Dr. Frank E. Robbins, Prof.
lexander G. Ruthven, Prof. James B.
dmonnson, Prof. Lewis M. Gram, Prof.
William A. Frayer, and Prof. John G.
Winter.
Among the problems taken up by
)ean Boucher were the guidance of
tudents, freshman week, and the im-
rovement of instruction in the first
wo years of college.
NEWBERRY ANNEX
ALMOSTFINISHED
Work on the Helen Newberry an-
exes is progressing rapidly. Most of
he interior finishing is done, the
louses are being painted now, and
nmy a few small carpenter jobs re-
ain. These houses are located on
raynard street across from Helen
ewberry. They will accomodate

hirty girls, and will be under the di-
ect supervision of the main dormi-
ory. The girls will board at the
esidence.!
Miss Lydia Tanner has been chosen!
irector of Helen Newberry next
ear, and Miss Mary Jarvis will act
s assistant director. The ciaper-
nes for the annexes have not as yet
een chosen.
EROY WATERMAN
TO GO TO BAGDAD
Prof. Leroy Waterman, of the Se-
nitics department, will spend next
ear in Mesopotamia as the Annual
?rofessor of Oriental Research in
3agdad. The Bagdad institution is
)e of a number maintained by
kmerican educational interests.
Professor Waterman will be en-
aged in excavating and in Archaeo-

ILECTURE SERIES ENDS
sWITH TALK ON VIRGIN
ISLANDS BY R. B. HALL,

I

11 G I V E S HISTORY OF ISLAND
t- UNDER RULE OF 3IANY
g IMPERIALISTS
d BS
- IMPORTANT NAVAL BASE
r Geographer Says Islands Safeguar
e Monroe Doctrine, Panama Canal
I And Control Caribbean
d "The Virgin Islands of the Unite
States" was the title of the illustrate
lecture delivered yesterday afternooi
in Natural Science auditorium b
i Mr. Robert B. Hill, of the Geography
0 department.
n "The islands are located eas0 o
n
Porto Rico, and are a part of th
lesser Antilles," stated Mr. Hill
, "There are more than 100 islands
n which occupy an area of 100 miles
t by 120 miles. They are owned par-
tially by England and partly by th
y United States."
Tells Why Purchased
Dr. Hall stated that the islands 01
r St. John, St. Thomas, and St. Croix
were those under United States rule.
These islands, a total of. 133 square
miles, were purchased from Denmark
in 1917 at a price of $25,000,000. Mr.
Hall enumerated three reasons for the
purchases. They were first, to safe-
guard the Monroe Doctrine, second, to
a guafd the eastern approach to the
Panama canal, and last, to further
the United States' control of the Car-
ribean.
Slides of the islands, beginning with
j St. Thomas, were shown by the lec-
turer, who illustrated the importance
of this first island as a naval base,
for which it is now being used. The
largest harbor is situated at the town
of St. Thomas on the island. "This
town," stated Mr. Hall, "is character-
ized by its Danish architecture."
"The inhabitants, however," he
continued, "although one would not
expect it, speak an English tongue or
'Patois,' which is a result of a Brit-
ish occupation 200 years ago. They
are all splendid linguists, most of
them speaking a Dutch-Creole dialect,'
French, and Danish."
The lecturer illustrated the water
system which is formed of concrete
rain catchers on the sides of the hills
and a large municipal cystern.
In speaking of St. John Mr. Hall
stated that the population of the is-
land has greatly declined in the last
200 years. In the 18th century there
were more than 5,000 people, while
now there are scarcely 1,000, all
black.
Population On Decrease
"The decrease in the population of
the islands has been general," stated
I Mr. Hall, "and this is blamed upon
the United States by the inhabitants
j who especially dislike the prohibition,
statutes.
"St. Croix, called the 'Head of the
Lesser Antilles,' is the largest and
most productive of the group. The
population is more than 15,000 peo-
ple. Christianstad and Frederickstad
are the leading towns, which are both
typically French in architecture. It
was in this island that Alexander
Hamilton, first secretary of the Treas-
ury, spent his early years."
Mr. Hall's lecture concluded the
Summer Session lecture series.
LECTURER TO TALK
ON ENGLISH MUSIC
Elizabethan English music and mi-
sical literature will be discussed in
one of the University lectures this

fall by Canon E. H. Fellows, authorj
of a book on "English Madigal Verse,"'
according to a letter received from
England and announced by Dr. Frank
E. Robbins, assistant to the President.
Canon Fellows will appear here
Oct. 20 and 21, and will give ex-!
amples of the music he discusses on
a guitar. He is being brought through
the efforts of Prof. J. H. Hanford of
the English department, and Earl V.
Moore, director of the School of Mu-
sic. His book, published by the Ox-
ford University Press, is going into

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Summer Session Enrollment Statistics
Give Graduate SchoolBiggest Increase
Comparative statistics of enroll- it had increased to 2,194. The increase
ment for the Summner session, isued by since that time had been uninterrupt-
Dean Edward A. Kraus, indicate that ed, there being 2,786 in 1922, and
this year's enrollment has far exceed- 3,147 in 1924.
ed that of any other summer school in The most striking increase is noted
the University's history. Statements in the graduate school, which num-
of increases over last year in various bered only 149 in 1918. This was
schools and colleges showed that the soon after the inauguation of the late
graduate school had the greatest in- Dean Alfred H. Lloyd, who became
crease, reaching a total of 1,032. head of the school in 1915, and con-
With a total registration in all tinued in that position until his death
schools and colleges of 3,811, this this spring. This summer's enroll-
summer's session passed that of last ment is larger than that of any pre-
year by 489, there being 3,322 attend- vious semester, including reguiar
ing a year ago. This includes the en- winter sessions, according to Dean
rollmen of 144 in the Public Health Kraus.

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REGISTRATION BLANKS'
TO BE MAILED BEFORE
TIME OF ENROLLMENT
NEW SYSTEM IS ARRANGED TO
SAVE TIME FOR FORMER
STUDENTS IN FALL
T0 SEND RECORD REPORT
Statement Of Credits, Honor Points,
And Group Requirements Will
Be Mailed

Institutes, which had not been in-
augurated last year.
Far exceeding any other schools or
colleges, the literary college, with
1,193 students, and the - graduate
schools led this season. The remain-
ing divisions ranked in the following
order: Engineering, school of edu-
cation, engineering and architectural
colleges, medical school, law school,
public health institutes pharmacy col-
lege and business administration
school.
Historical comparisons showed that
this year's enrollment was three time
that of 1910, when 1,237 attended the
Summer session, and more than dou-
ble that of the highest figure beforel
the war, in 1917, when 1,793 were
registered. In the following year the
number dropped to 1,301, but by 1920j

i

Registration blanks for the enroll

CO UR0SES IN EGYTIA
TO BE GIVEN IN 1927
Semitics Department Will Offer New
Subject Under Dr. Caroline
Ransom-Williams
OFFER SPECIAL LECTURES
With the acquisition of Dr. Caroline
Ransom-Williams, of Toledo, as spe-
cial lecturer in the Semitics depart-
ment for next year, the University
will offer for the first time courss in
Egyptian languages, literature, art
and religion.
Dr. Williams is a graduate of Mt.
I Holyoke college, and received her
master of arts and doctor's degrees
at the University of Ccichgo, having
I studied under Prof. James H. Breas-
ted. She was assistant professor of
art and archaeology at Bryn Mawr
from 1905 to 1910, assistant curator
in the Egyptian department of he
Metropolitan Museum of Art in New
York city until 1916, and has been a
member of the Oriental Institute of
Chicago, carrying on archaeological
work in Egypt.
The courses to be taught by Dr.
Ransom-Williams are Elementary
Egyptian, a survey of Egyptian major
and minor arts, illustrated, and
Egyptian religion taking up the de-
velopment of religious though, ritual
and iconography.
COOLIDGE FRIENDS
SA Y HE'LL RUN IF
PARTY DRAFTS HIM
(By Associated Press)
RAPID CITY, S. D., Aug. 11.-
Whatever President Coolidge intends
to do next year regarding the Re-
publican nomination, a group of his
friends, including a cabinet member,
a senator, a governor and several
gressmen, who were his guests to-
day, predicted he would run if the
convention nominated him.
They all were convinced that Mr.
Coolidge meant exactly what he said
in his statement that "I do not hoose
to run for President in 1928," but the
opinion was held by some that the
President would be drafted, and they
all agreed that if he were he would
run.
The group which visited at the
summer white house today included
Secretary Work, Senator Fess ofl
Ohio, Governor Fisher of Pennsyl-
vania, Reps. William E. Hull, of Il-
linois, Krudson and Selvig, of Minne:
sota and M. C. Brush, president of theI
International Mercantile Marine as-,
sociation, an old friend of Mr.
Coolidge.
Willam ln-nnvn aaemafn++ +:a

ment of former students in Septembe
will be-mailed to the students Augus
30, so that they can be filled out be
TI fore arrival in Ann Arbor, it was an
nounced yesterday by Ira M. Smith
Registrar. This system has been de
Sacc-Vanzetti To Have Full Bench vised in order to save time in the de
Hearing In Their Defense Itailed routine of registration.
Early Next WeekI
At the same time a statement o
SCHEDULED FOR TUESDAY' the student's record to date, includ
I ing his hours of credit, honor points
(ByN Associated Pr-s and group requirements will be sent
The registration blank which is to b
and Bartolomeo Vanzetti tonight were mailed is similar to those used i
lodged at a more comfortable distance
from the execution chamber at the previous years, and is composed o1
state prison than they had been for a series of cards, for the Treasurer'
a week while the way cleared for a office, Health Service, Union, S. C. A.
hearing in their defense before the and the student's receipt, will be sent
full bench of the Massachusetts, su- out. These can be filled out before
preme court. arriving in Ann Arbor, saving con
In contrast to last night when they
waited in the death cells until half siderable time at the registration
an hour before the time scheduled booth.
for their execution for the word Registration for upperclassmen will
which brought them 12 days more of begin Wednesday, Sept. 14, and will
life, tonight they were resting in ob- continue through Saturday, Sept. 17
viously better spirits in the Cherry Under the new system, the student
Hill section of the prison. will take his registration blank, al-
In contrast, too, to the flat denials ready filled out, directly to the tem-
of federal judges, the last pronounce- porary treasurer's office in Waterman
ment of the court yesterday, today gymnasium. It is necessary that all
gives them assurance of a hearing in i students find their Ann Arbor ad
the state supreme court of excep-l dresses as soon as possible, as the
tions to denial of a writ of error, Treasurer's fees will not be accepted
and also probably of exceptions to unless the Ann Arbor address ap-
superior court rulings which barred pears on the registration blank.
them from seeking a new trial or I Elections of classes will be car-
stay of sentence. *Iried on as usual, all sophomores be-
The next legal battle in behalf of I ing required to go to the Upperclass
Sacco and Vanzetti was scheduled to-' Advisory committee, and juniors and
day for 9:30 Tuesday morning when seniors being permitted to ask help
the four available justices of the there if they need it. Those who are
supreme court will meet as a full to see this committee must get ap-
bench to hear the bill of execptions i pointments as early as possible, as all
allowed by Judge Sanderson to his conferences will be handled by means
denial of a writ of error. of appointments and tickets, as in
Should their decision be favorable past years.
the case would go back to a single For enrollment in the larger
justice for a hearing on the merits classes, it will be necssary to ap-
with a possibility that it might pear before the classification com-
again reach a full bench. In the event mittee. A list of the subjects in
that Judge Webster Thayer, super- {which this process will be required,
ior court justice, who presided at I together with general instructions for
the trial, should allow exceptions to registration, will be published in a
his rulings of lack of jurisdiction on I leaflet to be distributed during regis-
a motion for a new trial and denials tration week.
of stay of execution and revocation
of sentence, the supreme court might TILDEN MA Y' PLA Y
hear this bill at the same sitting. AGAINST LACOSTE
DELANE Y WINS IN TENNIS FINALS
(Special to The Daily) (By Associated Press)
SOUTHAMPTON, N. Y., Aug. 1l-
NEW YORK, Aug. 11.-Jack Delaney Two Americans and two Frenchmen
won on a foul from Paolino in the I way to the semi-finals in
seyenth round of a non-titular bout the invitation tennis tournament here
Delaney will meet Jack Sharkey
whic wa schduld t go 5 rund today, assuring a French-Anmerican
which was scheduled to go 15 round. semi-final round tomorrow with prob-
sometime this winter. Delaney re- ability of a battle between William T.
cently gave up his light-heavyweight Tilden of the United States and Rene
crown to Sharkey. LaCoste of France in the final round
- I Saturday.
BASEBALL SCORES eThe winners besides Tilden and the
Frenchman who has beaten him twice
American League within a year were George Lott, sen-
Detroit, 6; St. Louis, 2. sational -young Chicago player, and
Celevand, 2; Cchicago, 1 (10 in IJack Brugnon, who, with his country-
iugs.) iman, Jean Barotra, holds the United
Washington, 3; New York 2; t11 States indoor doubles championship.
innings). Tilden is to meen Brugnon tomor-
Philadelphia, 4-0; Boston, 0-2. row and is favored to beat the crack
National League IFrench doubles player, who is ranked
St. Louis, 2; Pittsburgh, 1. after LaCoste, Cochet, and Barotra in
Chicago, 2; Cincinnati, 0. the singles. Litt's duel with LaCoste
New York, 3; Brooklyn, 2. t
r i en fnw h o nr n n

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but he declined to discus politics.
To all of this group who expressed
their sentiments to Mr. Coolidge re-
garding his choice not to run the
President replied substantially, "'It
was said, that 'This is not a one-man
contry.' Ten years is a long time
for any man to be president. There

is set for te e-aternoon.
Casting the only shadow on the
prosepcts of a great international bat-
tle in the finals, Tilden has been con-
sidering withdrawal on the ground
that a meeting with LaCoste now
would raise the morale of the winner
and thus affect the result of the forth-
coming Davis cup matches.

.

-Avers that It will be cloudy to-
day. He doesn't like warm weather,
though, and wishes he could predict

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