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August 03, 1927 - Image 1

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Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1927-08-03

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TODAY'S EVENTS
b:03 P. AL-"The Pogress
of International Coopera-
t wn," by Professor Dick-
:+) . M.-Faculty concert
at I3iji auditorium.

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MEMBER
A\SSOCIATED
PRESS

VOL. VIII No. 33

ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN, WEDNESDAY, AUGUST 3, 1927

JAPANESE INTRODUCI
AE[COMPROMISE MEASURI
INAVALCONFERENCI
BRIDGEMAN BELIEVES SUGGES-
TION IMPORTANT ENOUGHI
TO BE CONSIDERED
TEXT NOT PUBLISHED
Spectre of Failure Still Present, How
ever, and Little Hope Held for
Successful Conclusion
03v Associated Press)
GENEVA, August 3.-"Just an idea,'
was the moderate saying which the
Japanese statesman used when pre-
snting early today to Hugh S. Gibson,
chief American representative, their
compromise formula of the cruiser
problem which has menaced the Tri-
partite Naval conference with failure.
Despite this new move, however, it
was said in responsible quarters to-
night that the spectre of failure, fail-
ure which, as a prospect, has gen-
uinely alarmed responsible men of
many countries, did not yet be deemed
definitely avoided; yetfrom the Amer-
ican standpoint at least, the Japanese
plan to save the conference Is said to
appear after closest study to include
many attractive features worthy of
being treated as a basis for negotia-
tion.,
Gibson Cables Text
Mr. Gibson cabled the text of the
proposal to Washington today, to-
gether with his own views and com-
ments. Furthermore, W.C. Bridge-
man, chief British delegate, who got
the plan from Admiral Saito, and Vis-
count Ishii :soon after they had sub-
mitted it to Mr. Gibson, has tele-
graphed it t3 London. It is said that
Mr. Bridgeman believed the sug-
gestion to be of so important a nature
as to justify its consideration by the
British cabinet.
When the Japanese employed the
expressed, "An idea," in giving the
formula to Mr. Gibson, they meant
what they said. They explained that
they quite realize it was entirely im-
nn~n^ nrlair +nvhnPAMr Ib-

PRINCE ARRIVES
FOR LONG VlSIT

1 IilCHN DE

Prince Christopher of Greece was
photographed on his arrival at New
York for a two months' visit with
American friends. The prince was
the husband of the late Mrs. William
B. Leeds, widow of "the tin plate
king."
PRINCIPALS DEFE IA T
OPPONENTS BY 237
Picnic After Game Considered Huge
Gastronomic Success By
All Present
60 MEMBERS INITIATED
The hard - slugging principals
downed the superintendents 23-7ina
hard fought indoor baseball game yes-
terday afternoon at Ferry field,
thereby winning undisputed cham-
pionship of the Men's Education
league. Mills and Loomis were the
the batteries for the winners; Clark
and VandenBelt for the superinten-
dents. The sensational fielding of
Benjamin, the superintendents' left
fielder, was one of the bright spots of;

Mrs. Harry 11. lHltchiins wife
President Emeritus liarry B. Htc
ins of the Univcrsity, died at 9) o'clo
last night. Mrs. Hutchins was take
ill suddenly early in the evenin
Slh)iais 77 N c rs of age.
The couple had been married a
Imos" 55 years, having been manrli
December 26, 1S72. Mrs. Hutchin
)Haiden name was Mary L Crocker ac
her hc me had been in tt. Clene
before the marriage.
i
I ASTCNCERT TO B1
PRFSFNTFO TONIH
RY SCHOOL OFMUSh:
FREEMAN AND RHEAD TO PLA1
IN FINAL MUSICAL OF
SUMMER SESSION
ARE WELL KNOWN
Mrs. Rhead Has Been Accoimpanis
Of Choral Union And Has Been A
Soloist InI May Festival
The last concert in the series o
summer recitals given by the Uni
versity School of Music, will be pre.
sented at 8:15 this evening in Hil
auditorium. Mrs. Marian Strubl(
Freeman, of the violin faculty, anc
Mrs. Mabel Ross Rhead of the pian
faculty, will take part.
Both of these musicians are wel
known throughout the country both
as soloists and withtorchestras. Mrs
Freeman recently returned from th
round-the-world University Cruise
On her tour she gave many concerts
on board ship and while in port. O
particular interest was her appear-
ance as soloist in the private theatre
of Rama VII, King of Siam, at Bang-
kok, where she was given a tremend-
ous ovation and personnally compli-
niented by the king. During the war
Mrs. Freeman spent many months in
France playing to the soldiers. She
is a graduate of the University School

HM YR11MKILE WILL NOT SEEK
FOR NOMINATIOI
v WHFN HIS PARACHUTE
kg.
SFAILS TO FUNCT!ONJl,:f'CJtt':}.':"'1j - (,]}J
ed LIEU'TENANT LECLAIR SCIUILZE
s' IS VICTIM OF BURNING
nd AIRPLANE
n- - -
WAS TESTING PLANE - .._-
Schulze, One Of Army's Best Known . ! .- - .
Aviators, Was Testing New -WF C
Plane Whien Fire Cane
S SELFRIDGE FIELD, Mich., Aug. 2.
-Lieut, Leclair D. Schulze, of the
First Pursuit Group, and one of the
best known Army airmen, was killed
here at 10 a. m. today when he jump-
ed 1,000 feet from a burning airplane
and his parachute failed to open.
Schulze was testing a new engine
in a pursuit plane. He was flying
away from the field toward the Clin- Calvin Coolidge,
ton rvrwe bevr on the Thirtieth president of the United
t Sriver when observers nt tates, who de ared yesteiday tha
ground saw his plane burst into he would not run for re-election i
flames. the coming campaign of 1928. Coolidge
The watcher§ saw Schulze leap came into office upon the death o
)f frem the plane and saw him hurtle Warren G. Harding in 1923 and was
~- carhward. When officers reached the ,re-elected in 1924. If he were to run
s erwhr. hen ofaicersnreacd the n he would be seeking a third term, a
-spot where he had fallen' they found violation of the custom laid down by
l le had not pulled the rip cord on his Wahingtons
e parachute. It is their belief he lost-
d consciousness as he left the plane- AN SPEAK BEORE
His parachute was not defective.
1 Selfridge officers said. The plane
hlcrashed about 50 feet from where IGRAUATE STUDNrTS
Schulze's body was found and was eUdestroyed byU[ire.
edestroyed by fire. .___
The cause of the fire could not be Dean Kraus Tells Education Students
determined. of Zeal for Summer Study in
f A Veteran Flyer the United States
- Lieut. Schulze was one of the vet-
san fliers of the Army Air Service. HUBER, WHITNEY TALK
_ During the World War lie served as
- a test pilot at the American overseas More than 90 per cent of the Grad-
aviation base at Issoudon, France, nate students in education were pre-
and flew all types of pursuit planes sent at a meeting which was held for
used by the American forces. He was them yesterday afternoon in Natural
recommended for the Distinguished teieseraydtrnmr
Service Medal. Science auditorium.
He came to Selfridge Field with Dean Edward H. Kraus as the first
the First Pursuit Group in 1920, and speaker, made the significant state-
for a time was adjutant of the group. ment that nowhere else is there such
He flew a Loening monoplane in the a passion for summer study as in the
1922 race for the Pulitzer Trophy at United States and that the American
Selfridge Field. teacher stands out distinctly in that
A few months later he was detach- respect in comparison with other
ed from the First Pursuit Group to teachers in the world. The policy of
participate in the Army Air Service's the Summer session at the University
historic flight around the world. of Michigan is different than that of
Aided World Fliers many universities, according to Dean
He had an active part in solving Kraus, in that if there is a demand
the engineering problems of this for a new course, no qestion is ever
flight, and was in charge of the base asked as to whether the attendance
established in Greeland to facilitate fees from an additional course will
the flight of the round-the-world air- cover the expense of it. Not more
men across the North Atlantic Ocean. than 45 per cent of the total cost of
He recently returned to the First I the Summer session is cared for by
Pursuit Group at Selfridge Field, after the attendance fees, and this is also
a course of study in the Air Service's true of the academic year when the
1 tactical schools. Previously Schulze same policy is followed. Dean Kraus
had played an important part in the stressed the fact that the aim of the
development of a tactical system of Summer session is to give such in-
air combat by pursuit planes under struction as there is demand for.

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PRESIDENT OF U NITED STATES
HAKES ANNOUNCEMENT
TO NEWSPA PEIRS
TYPES OUT MESSAGE
Coolidge Makes Announcement on 4th
Anniversary of His Taking
Oath of Office
(By Associated Press)
RAPID CITY, S. D., Augg. 2.--Presi-
dent Coolidge today issued 'a state-
ment saying:
"I do not choose to run for presi-
dent in 1928."
The statement, which was type-
written on small pieces of paper, was
handed out tpday by the president on
the fourth anniversary of his becom-
ing chief executive of the United
States, without comment.
Mr. Coolidge had asked newspaper
men to see him at 12 o'clock today.
Until a minute or two before there
was not the slightest knowledge
among the presidential staff of what-
would occur at the conference.
Sends Secretary
Shortly before 12 o'clock Mr. Cool-
idge sent for his personal stenogra-
pher, Edwin Geiser, and dictated the
brief message which was then trans-
cribed onto small pieces of paper by
typewriter.
After the newspaper men had coen

PRICE FIVE CENTS
4'i DO NOT CHOOSE TO
~RUN, FOR PRESIDENT
IN 1928' -COOLIOGE

perfect, and said tney nopeivi r.u1 - the game.iy
son would feel free to make any modi- All-Americans Win of Music, and before becoming a mem-
fications or any comment he desired. The teachers had to take the short ber of the faculty was head of the
They told Mr. Bridgeman the same i end of an 18-3 for cellar champion_ Department of Music in Hillsdale
thing. The Japanese delegates said, ! ship from the faculty's all-American college.
however, that they thought the idea team, composed of Blott and Kipke. Rhead Is Noted Artist
had fundamentally something to be Batteries for the teachers were Cooper Mrs. Rhead is an artist of note.
said for it. and Webb. For several years she has been ac-
Text Not Published The picnic dinner was a gastrono- companist of the University Choral
The text of the formula has not mic triumph for the club. The bill Union, and has appeared in a number
been published, but the correspon- of fare included hot dogs, doughnuts, of May Festivals with noted soloists.
dents of the Associated Press under- ice cream and pickles. She also has held the honored posi-
stand that the essence of the Japanese At 8 o'clock the Society of the L.1- tion of soloist with the Detroit, Chi-
project is this: Y. D. initiated 60 members. I cago and St. Louis Orchestras, and
It provides. for the maintenance of has given many concerts in various
the status quo, so far as cruiser CHICAGO-Only one woman in 10 parts of the country. She is recog-
strength is concerned, both for Great in the -United States fails to cosmetize nized as one of the finest virtuosi
Britain and Japan, and gives the herself properly. of the middle west.
United States an opportunity to "catch
up" with them in powerfully armed f
and armored cruisers. PLAYER'S GIVE SHAKESPEARE'S
Under this interpretation the "built SHAKESPEARE'S
and buildings" would then constltute PLAY "THE COMEDY OF ERRORS"
the total tonnage itmitation for Great
Britain and Japan up to 1931, and in A Rview, By Robert G. Ramsay
the case of Great Britain it is esti-
mated that it would bring the British The Shakespeare tradition in the was entrusted entirely to them, and
naval total well under 400,000 tons. theater seemed once to be as inviol- to the policemen, and their enthu-
This is the figure the Americans gave able and sacred as the Bayreuth tra- siasm alone carried the piece. To be
the British and Japanese to under- dition in music yet producers have sure there was good work. Miss
stand a few weeks ago that they taken such liberties with the master- Kearne's schooled in some years of
would be willing to go to as a maxi- pieces of the stage that one fears Shakespearean work with Ben Greet,
mum in order to reach an agreement. now to see Wagner's Brunhilde, was particularly fine in her sulphu-
sheltered for years by the adamant rous description of her husband, and
SHERIDAN KILLED opinion of Cocima,rise from her rock as the jealous wife gave a careful, if
IN TRAIN WRECK in her famous third act entrance, clad somewhat woodenish portrayal.
either in her virgin beauty, or in The production itself was excellent,
Howard A. Sheridan, '25E, was knickers. It has been justly stated the costuming immensely effective and
killed in a railroad accident in De- in the program, that "The Comedy of interesting, and the arrangement of
troit, late yesterday, friends here Errors" is the only play of Shakes- the set remarkable. The prologue,
learned. Details of the accident were peare's in which such liberties could itself the only skillful element of the
not known. J be indulged or perpetrated. For the play, was well ordered, though the
Sheridan has been living in Ford- syncopation of the comedy is the only playing of the Duke tempts one to
son where he was assistant general' thing that could make it acceptable. borrow the criticism of Eugene Field,
superintendent of F. R. Patterson It is hopeless and farcical drivel. The that "the King played as if he was
company. While in the University humor, which even in the sapcious constantly under the apprhension that
he was a member of he Tau Beta Pi times of Good Queen Bess must have some one would play the Ace." ,
fraternity. He also served as an in-; been decidedly mature, does not equal However, it is ambitious attempt
structor in the gymnasium while a the spontaneous gusto of Falstaff, the which no one should miss, for withal
student here. brilliant wit of Much Ado, clothed as it is a creditable undertaking. One
T__ ___it is in a protective veil of bright might permit oneself the luxury of a
W OM1EN'S LEAGUE poetic fanry, nor does it approach few tears, though, that they did not
the superior comedy of "The Merch- stick to their original intention of?
WILL GIVE TEA ant of Venice." The subtleties of com- giving "Much Ado About Nothing."
The Women's League of the Uni-' edy, seem chiseled out by the hand of With "The Comedy of Errors" the
versity of Michigan will give a tea an unwitting blacksmith, the comic Rockford group brings their season
from 4 to 5:30 this afternoon in the situations are null, and splendidly of summer plays to a close. No one
parlors of Helen Newberry Residence, void. could deny that they have been im-
in honor of the Rockford Players. Miss With the exception of the dromios mensely popular, and incredibly suc-
Lucy Elliot, summer social director none of the players responded to the cessful in bringing entertainment to
Qf Helen Newberry, will pour. jazz casting. The, farcical element Ann Arbor audiences.

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into the room, the president asked
them to file past him. He handed
each the small slip of paper with the
message. The paper had been folded
by him.
Newspaper men stopped to ask him
if there was any comment, and Mr.
Coolidge replied negatively. The
dash - for telephones and telegraph
wires was begun by the newspaper
men.
Other Guests Present
Besides the newspaper men, there
were in the room at the time Senator
Capper, a house guest of the presi-
dent, Everett Sanders and Edward T.
Clark, his secretaries; Blanton Win-
ship, his military aid, and Dr. James
F. Coupal, his physician.
No word was spoken, outside of Mr.
Coolidge asking if everyone was
present and inquiry of newspaper men
if there was anything more to say.
It is safe to say that the president
counseled with no one in preparing
his startling announcement.
Those closest to him in his official
family had taken occasion on this day,
the fourth anniversary of Mr. Cool-
idge taking the oath of office, to ex-
press the private view that he would
not make any statement of his plans
for another term and would accept the
nomination if given -to him, without
expressing himself.
S. C. A. CAMP WILL
'BE OPENED SOON
The International Recreational,
Camp, sponsored by the Student
Christian Association of the Univer-
sity, will be held August 20-27, at
Patterson Lake on the grounds of the
University Fresh Air Camp Enroll-
ment is open to men enrolled in the
Spring or Summer session of the uni-
versity who are interested in an eco-
nomical week's outing, and who de-
sire to make acquaintances of an in-
ternational sort. The comp is meant
for Foreign students especially. Boat-
ing, swimming, rest, discussions, eat-
ing and hiking will form the major
part of the day's program.
The cost will be $7 for the entire
weeks' expense. Registrations should
be made at the main desk of Lane
Hall as soon as possible.
This activity is part of the Student
Christian Association's program of In-
ternational EEducation.
OurWeatherMan I
SouTH

Maj. air Spatz, former commander of Dean Whitney'Talks
Slefridge Field. This was a revolu- Opportunities for part time work
tionary development in aerial war- during the academic year were dis-
cussed by Dean Allan S. Whitney of
Ifare. -IteSho fEuain
After Lieut J. Thad Johnson was;the School of Education.
killed last month at Ottawa while I1A few years ago Saturday classes
escorting Col. Charles A. Lindbergh, were utilized largely by undergradu-
- Lieut Schulze succeeded Johnson as 'ates, butttheyhave gradually changed
commndin ~~ficerof te Twnty- until at the present time they are or-I
t commanding officer of the Twenty- .
Seventh Squadron at Selfridge Field. ganized chiefly With the graduate stu-
-dent in mind. During the academic!
Hie was 36 years old and was un-
marred as ayear, teachers from all parts of the
married.'state take advantage of this opportun-
ity to work for a higher degree. DeanF
CHICAGO GIVES UP Whitney averred that such a system;
PLANS FOR FAIR I increased the service of the University
and that the results proved part time
(Ty Associated Press) worthwhile.
CHICAGO, Aug. 2.-The Tribune I Dean Huber SpeaksI
says today that the administration of That organization of work for a'
Mayor William Hale Thompson has master's degree should include endeav-j
decideyor abamdonHansforaswo or along lines of research, is thej
decided to abandon plans for a world sopinion of Dean Carl 0 Huber -of the
fair and centennial exposition in 1933. Graduate School. He also expressed
A member of the mayor's advisory the hope that in the future a more
committee is quoted as saying that a liberal interpretation would be given
world's fair is provincial in the mod- to advanced degrees so that students
ern age and that it would prove un- working for them could take some
successful. work in their field of special interest.'
The march of progress has made However the Master's degree should
other things more important, such as mean something more than adding
subways, lake front - projects and I just another year to the collegiate
other proposed civic improvements.' course, and Dean Huber requested
The Tribune says that instead of the that all students who are working for
world's fair, the city will observe 1933 a' master's degree would do their best
as a gala year, marking the comple- to make the standards for it as high
tion of all projected enterprises, as possible.

-Thinks that it will be somewh1mat
warmer and unsettled,

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