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This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

June 28, 1927 - Image 2

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1927-06-28

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PAGE TWO
04f *~umnter
Published every morning except Monday
dulring the University Summter Session by
the Board in Control of Student Publica-
tions.
The Associated Press is exclusively en-
titled to the ruse for republication of all news
dipatches credited to it or not otherwiseI
credited inethis paper and the local news pub-
lished herein.
Entered at the Ann Arbor, Michigan,
postofihce as second class matter.
Subscription by carrier, $.o50; by mail,
$2.00.
Offices: Press Building, Maynard Street,
Ann Arbor, Michigan.
EDITORIAL STAFF M
Telephone 4925
MANAGING EDITOR
PHILIP C. BROOKS
Editorial Director......Paul J. Kern
City Editor.....Joseph E. Brunswick
Feature Editor..... Marian L. Welles
Nigit Editors
Carlton G. ChampeH. K. Oakes, Jr.
John E. Davis Orville Dowzer
G. Thomas McKean T. E. Sunderland
Reporters
Charles IKaufman Louis R. Markus
Mary Lister Miriam Mitchell
Betty Pulver
BUSINESS STAFF
Telephone 21214
BUSINESS MANAGER
LAITRANCE J. VAN TUYL
Advertising ............Ray Wachter
Accounts ........... John Ruswinckel
Circulation ..............Ralph Miller
Assistants
C. T. Antonopulos S. S. Berar
G. W. Platt
Night Editor-JOE E. BRUNSWICK
The Daily believes now, as it,
has continuously. since the auto
ban was proposed last spring, that
a complete prohibition of student
cars, as enacted by the Rengets

THE SUMMER MICHIGAN DAIL N

TUEFSDlAY. JUTNE 28

is reactionary and narrow, especial-
ly when there are other means of con-
trolling the morals of the student
body.
It is to be hoped that the complete
prohibition of automobiles at the Uni-
versity then will be as short-lived as
possible; and that some rational basis
of regulation will be instituted as a
subtitute. If the prohibition is meant
as merely a stringent regulation, with
broad interpretations for the students
who properly use their motor cars,
then it is perhaps excusable; other-
wise the additional cost of enforcing
the prohibition could better be spent
in regulation.
One final error the rulings make,
also which should not be overlooked.
The establishment of a student com-
mittee to aid in the enforcement of
the regulations is unwise. Students'
have better things to do wih their
time than spending long hours in the
office of the dean of students partici-
pating in a routine administrative
work that is as much a part of the
responsibility of the authorities of the
University as the enforcement of at-
tendance at classes. If he Univer-
sity is in earnest about letting the
students participate In disciplinary
measures it could easily show it by
granting the Student Council some
measure of authority that does not
have the ever present item "subject
to the approval of the Senate Commit-
te on Student Affairs."
With this, then, The Daily rests its
case against the abolition of student
automobiles until next fall. Its poli-
cy will be, as it has been, one of un-
compromising antipathy to a ruling
which it believes to be unwise and
unfair. To summarize; it feels that,
first, a large percentage of the student
cars are used legitimately; second,
that there are better means of combat-
ing the problem of student morality
than this, principally by some small

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recently is unwise and unduly re- measure of decisive action in disci
strictive. Since thF. regular ses- luiary cases, third; that some st
sio of the University has closed, dents need their automobiles f
and the new regulation does not transportation purposes; and final
take effect until next fall, there that the ruling constitutes a typec
call be no further statement of the paternalism which is not consiste
students' viewpoint until then. with the conduct of an institutionc
The Daily, however, takes this higher learning, and which cntr
opportunity to state definitely and dictes the progressive steps whi
clearly the stand that it holds,and science has made in the field of ra
Ini which it believes the majority id transportation.
of the student body will concur.
The central thesis of the argument THEY LNSST
for automibiles revolves on the point The perennial naval armament pro
that large numbers of the student lem, this year taken to a conferen
body are capable of properly deport- of the great powers at Geneva, h
ing themselves even though possessed again assumed its rather anomalo
of cars. It can not be denied that the aspect. Three great nations, each pr
large majority of motor cars, even sumably desiring limitation and c
when there was no restriction, was operation, have met and each is i
properly used, and it is a plain fact, sisting that it gain something at th
of course, that the most disastrous expense of the other two. Wheni
accident occuring last spring would is borne in mind that only one of the
have been avoided if the University nations can afford a competitive a
had enforced even the moderate regu- mament program, the situation b
lations then in force. comes still more ridiculous.
Coincident with this standpoint is The three navies of Great Britai
the premise that large numbers of the the United States, and Japan compos
students need their cars. Several of the major naval strength of th
the fraternities ;are mgre than a mile world. Limited to'almost any reason
from the campus, and to these stu- able proportions, the ships of thes
dents at least some method of rapid three nations would still be superio
transportation is indispensable. These to those of the other powers. Sti]
cases are too numerous to be "extra- each of them insists, while disavowin
ordinary and exceptional" under the selfish motive, that its own strengh
wording of the auto ruling, and either be left comparatively intact whil
the statement of the regulation will the other two reduce.
have to be disregarded in these cases If none of the three powers antici
or a positive hardship will be worked pate war, and each denies such an
on large numbers of the student body. ticipation, it is certainly unresonabl
The improper use of motor cars, to continue competitive ship-building
what is more, though probably serious g But international conferences are al
can be curbed in other ways than by ways clouded with suspicion, and a
out and out prohibition. The Univer- long as such suspicion exists it i
sity has consistently been too mild probably useless to expect far reach
with its moral offenders, and has ne- ing achievements.
glected time after time to eliminate
students who had no business being CAMPUS OPINION
in attndance here. This is a plain y
indictment of the University authori- disregarded. The names of communi-
ties. If the milk and water policy of cants will, however, be regarded as
conservatism in handling disciplinary ' confidential upon request.
cases, which has persisted through the THE ALUMNI ERR
whole !policy of the administration, To the Editor:
were done away with, nine tenths of I hope that you will print the reso-
those who use cars improperly would lution that I offered at the Alumni
be eliminated on other and more logi- Association meeting of Saturday, June
cal grounds, and at least one serious 18, and which the majority of the
auto accident could have been avoid- alumni voted against and defeated.
ed last spring. The exact words of the resolution are
There is an excuse for retaining the as follows:
poor but serious student, and there RESOLVED: That the Regents
may be an excuse for retaining the of the University of Michigan be
brilliant but fallible student, but in authorized to and are hereby re-
the broad class of cases which are quested to create and establish a
neither brilliant nor serious it is course of instruction of the his-
time that the University adopted an tory of the territory and state of
iron handed policy of elimination, for Michigan.
the sake of its own reputation. It is difficult to conceive of a more
Attempts to enforce morality by co- ridiculous-not to say asinine-ac-
ercioiii especially on a body of men tion. The Alumni Association assumes
and women who are presumed to have that it is immaculate, and beyond criti-
some intelligence of their own (by cism and refuses to permit any inves-
all but the University authorities) are tigation as to the facts, even by the
likely to fail, and the auto regula- Regents of the University of Michigan.
tions, and artificial attempt to enforce It seems to me desirable that the
an unnatural condition without going Alumni and students should know of
to the core and eliminating the funda- thisearrogance on the part of those
mental evil, are likewise apt to fail. present at the annual meeting satur-
Automobiles, in the present organi- day. Mr. Shaw, secretary, can give
zation of society, have become an in- the facts and perhaps he will, so that
dispensible means of rapid communi- you will not be dependent upon what
cation, which have revolutionized so- I say.
ciety. To prohibit their use in serv- Frank H. Culver,
ing the legitimate end of saving time Attorney, Chicago.

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OASTED
ROLLS
SCHOOL
OPENS
* * *
BULLETIN: At a late hour yes-
terday is was rumored that suminer
school had opened in several places
on the campus. The Regents have
not yet abolished classes.
Co-iicident with the other catas-
trophe Robert Henderson and his gang
of Roquefort players presented the
butter and egg man at Sarah Caswell
Angell hall. It is for the benefit of
the Women's League, of course, which
makes it a duty to attend.
* * *
REGENTS WILL BAN GALOSHES
Due to the increasing number of
fatalities from the wearing of over-
shoes, the Board of Regents, at its
latest meeting, issued a regulation
prohibiting the ' wearing of rubber
soled shoes or overshoes by students
next year. The exact wording of the
regulation follows:
"No student in attendance at the
University from and after the first of
the semester this coming fall shall
operate any galoshes or rubber soled
shoes or other dangerous vehicles,
except in exceptional and extraordi-
nary cases, when, at the discretion of
the Dean of Students this rule maiy
be relaxed (for the benefit of those
suffering' from asthma and pneunmo-
nia.)
The ruling became necessary be-
cause of the fact that only three years
ago a student at Barry County Nor-
mal was killed when his unbuckled
galoshe caught and tripped him.
"Such accidents must be avoided
here," the Regents' spokesman de-
clared.
* * *
FIRE COMMISSON WILL
ABOLISH FACTORIES
Factories in the state of Michigan
will be abolished, because they con-
stitute a fire hazard, it was declared
last night by the State fire commis-
sion. Only three months ago nearly
twenty lives were lost when a De-
troit factory burned, and the commis-
sion seeks to avoid such catastrophes
in the future. The exact wording of
the ruling does not follow.
Besides this the factories constitute
a serious moral problem, the state
commission believes, since many girls
are forced to travel to and from work
unchaperoned. The ban will be re-
laxd in exceptional and extraordi-
nary cases.
Several Regents of the University
of Michigan who own factories ob-
jected to the ruling, but the State
Fire commission pointed to their own
action abolishing student automobiles
as to precedent.
-* * *
ATHLETIC ASSOCIATION PLANS
TO GIVE STUDENTS SEATS
A revulsion in the policy of the-
Athletic Association was accomplish-
ed at their last meeting, when it was
decided to place students, citizens,
and alumni on an equal footing as
regards ticket distribution. It was
observed in many quarters that this
will give the students an even chance
to obtain seats for football games
next fall, something which they have
never enjoyed before.
* * *
An announcement from the office of
he Athletic Association said in part I
that "This step is taken in spite of
he fact thtt the students have not-
ing to do with intercollegiate sports,
and have no right to see the team in

action. The only possible connection
etween the student body and the team
s the fact that the team comes from
hte student body, and it is purely
Front unselfish motices that we will
ive the students an even chance to
et tickets for the games next fall."
* * *
The Student Council promptly ad-
pted a resolution commending the
ction of the Athletic Association and
ppointing a committee to investigtte.
* * *
At a late hour last night it was re-
orted that several \copies of The
ummer Michigan Daily remained un-
ubscribed. Those having $1.50 in
ash or United States stamps will be
ermitted to purchase said papers.
-(Adv.)
* * *
Wanted: Two pipe courses. Must
ot meet more than four hours a
eek. Responsible party will attend
t least half the classes. Can get up I
or an 11 o'clock or stay awake until
0 at night. Economics instructors
ged not apply. Address replies to
ox 1, Michigan Daily.
Charles Lindbergh once lived in
nn Arbor, according to latest reports.
he country does not seem to be hold-
g it against him, however.
Kernel.

e

Rider's
Pen Shop
Observe, that Riderpen service is
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is one of the very few places in the whole
country where your exacting require-
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makers.
While in Ann Arbor, we urge yousto
become acquainted with this very un-
usual service which is attracting world
wide attention.
We manufacture the famouns Rider
"Masterpen" and sell and service other
makes as well.
Get your Masterpen direct from the

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Typewriter Shop
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We have entered this field confident
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Let us clean, repair or service your
Typewriter. You will like our workman-
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We are headquarters for Royal Type-
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nad sell machines of all standard makes
at fair prices.
Give us a call.

SKILLED REPAIRING

a

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315 South State St.
Phone 8950
24-HOUR SERVICE

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Ladies and Gentlemen
Single Heals - 50c, 65c
Weekly Board -.$.75
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1

GRANGER'S
TUESDAY AND THURSDAY
Nights
8:30 to 10:30
75c per couple
Barton Hills Country Club
Orchestra
Granger's Academy

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JUNE SALE
MERRICK - IMPORTERI
Chinese Heirloom Rugs
928 Church Phone 3155

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