100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Download this Issue

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

July 26, 1927 - Image 2

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1927-07-26

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

TWO

THE SUMMER MICHIGAN DAILY

-m

Published every morning except Monday
during the University Summer Session by
the Board in Control of Student Publica-
tions. 1
The Associated Press is exclusively en-
titled to the use for republication of all news
dispatchescredited to it or not otherwise
credited in this paper and the local news pub-
lished herein.
Entered at the Ann Arbor, Michigan,I
'ostoffice asseeond class matter.
Subscription by carrier, $1.5o; by mail,
Offices: Press Building, Maynard Street,
Ann Arbor, Michigan.
EDITORIAL STAFF
Telephone 4925
MANAGING EDITOR
PHILIP C. BROOKS
Editorial Director.... .Paul J. Kern
City Editor.. Joseph E. Brunswick
Feature Editor..Marian L. Wellesr
Night Editors
Carlton G. ChampeH. K. Oakes, Jr.
John E. Davis Orville Dowzer
T. E. Sunderland
Reporters
E. M. Hyman Miriam Mitchell
Mary Lister
Robert E. Carson Betty Pulver
Wrn. K. Lomason Louis R. Markus
BUSINIESS STAFF
Telephone 21214
BUSINESS MANAGER
LAURANCE J. VAN TUYL
Advertising.............Ray Wachter
Accounts ........... John. Ruswinckel

the struggle, and if the situation

is

analagous at all, and it certainly is
analagous, then the whole country
can expect some day that the ques-
tion of prohibition will "cease to ex-
ist and come .as a matter of course."
After all, the nation is only a large
sized community on the order of
Maine. If that state has succeeded,
here is no reason to feel alarm at
the present national situation. All
great things take time, and there is
bound to elapse a period between the
time the law is enacted and thetime
it is completely enforced, especially
in the cases of moral questions; but
we have at least reached the stage
where the law has been enacted. We
are passing through a narrow interim
in the history of human progress,
where the last die-hards of a reac-
tionary era are getting in their final
thrusts at the progress which is
1 bound to come. All great human
achievements have been thus. The
Reformation suffered by St. Bartholo-
mew's massacre, republicanism the
heel of the falling monarchs, mono-
gamy its mormonism, and now pro-
hibition itself as crossing the narrow
gulf where it is facing the dying op-
position of the dying reactionaries.
There may be those who sad that
prohibition hasn't succeeded, but let
there be none who say that prohibi-
tion won't succeed. Even on the first
point there may. be some disagree-
ment, for, contrary to the false re-
ports given by propogandists, figures
from the census department show
that leaths from alcoholism have de-
creased. Figures from the financial
centers show that bank deposits have#
increased, and they show that mil-
lions more are being spent on soft
drinks and less vicious amusements
since the cause of intoxicating liquor
began its last convulsions.
It will take time, of course, Sane
men like Governor Brewster admit
that. By every analysis that we have
available, however, the cause of the,
open saloon is doomed. America is'
progressing, and perhaps some day a
president of the United States may
say, with the complete truthfulness
of Governor Brewster, that the issue
of prohiition is dead throughout the
nation as it is dead in Maine, and
that the cause of human progress has
prevailed.
After all there seems to be no dif-
ference of opinion on the undesir-
ability of making available ot the

TFroAS!ED L
THE
GOVERNORS
MEET
WAY UP AT THE NORTHERN end
of this state of Michigan all the gov-
ernors of some of the states are
meeting to solve problems. We wish
some of them would take a few math
ourses around here and solve prob-
lems for us.
* * *
BUT THAT CRACK ABOVE is a
pun and now we have to write someth-
ing funny. About the easiest way of
filling this column with funny things
would be to print pictures of a few
choice governors, but they might ob-
ject to that.
* * *
WHENEVER WE THINK OF gov-
ernors we always think of the day
when the Governor of South Carolina
said to the Governor of North Caroli-
na, "It's a long time between drink."
Evidently that governor was elected
on a prohibition platform ,and was
fool enough to stick by it.
* * *
OUR OWN GOVERNOR, Fred Green,
spoke about the troubles of the gene-
ral property tax. Right there he
agrees with the political science de-
dpartment and calls to mind the de-
lightful possibilities of evading such
a tax. Down in Illinois (Len Small
is the governor) there is a county
called Cook and city called Chicago.
In this county, where machine guns
are heard cracking once a week,
watches seem to be rather scarce.
According to a recent general prop-
erty tax report, only one in every
300 or more persons in that part of
the country owned a watch or clock.
Perhaps they were afraid of hold
ups. But, in McHenry county, which
is next to Cook county, watches not
only were scarce, they were curios.
According to the repot, in this county
there are 45,000 people and only three
watches or clocks.
***
AND NOW, WE, THE writer of this
column, must confess that we live in
Chicago, and we wish we were home
so that we could say some nasty
things about Len Small, but since we
are at present in Michigan and he is
here too, we have to tell the world
that he is a fine governor. Well,

HALLER'S
State Street
Jewelers.

10

GRAHAMS
TWO STORES

I

v

I

fl

mm

Books and Supplies
for Summer School

Final Clearance
SADLE
Fall Collegiate Suits
Actual Values
$40, $50 to $60

Be sure to visit
ing Building.

our store across from the Engineer-
Maintained for your convenience,

I

Assistants
C. T. Antonopulos,
G. W. Platt

S. S. Berar{

25.00
$2.50 White Broadcloth
Shirts $1.69
213 E. Liberty

Both Ends of the Diagonal.
Subscribe For The Michigan Weekly

Night Editor-H. K. OAKES, JR.
TUEDSDAY, JULY 26, 1927
NOT A MORON THOUGI A
GOVERNOR
One thing at least that the gover-
nors' conference at Mackinac Island
has done for the state is the bring-
Ing _to Michigan of Governor Ralph
Brewster of Maine. Tucked away in
an obscure corner of the metropol-j
tan press, his arrival was not her-
alded widely, nor did it deserve to be,
for his daughter is not engaged to
John Coolidge and on the whole Mr.
Brewster is a wholly respectable
man.
But even unspectacular governors
often have something of real value
to say, and this is where the gover-
nor of Maine shines. Sound ideas all
too few among men of his position,
but when one does emanate it should
not be ignored, even though it lacks
the essence of sensationalism. Gov-
ernor Brewster, it seems, comes from
the state that was the first to pass
a prohibition law, and while this is
of interest in itself, it is not nearly
as significant as the opinion which
the governor has of that law.
Those who declare the eighteenth
amendment a complete failure be-
cause it has failed to make the coun-
try bone dry in less than ten years
are due for a rude jolt when they
learn that Maine, the first state to go
dry, required 25 years for the same
process. They are due for an even
more severe jolt when they learn
that the governor-of that state de-
clares that it is foolish for xis -to ex-
pect anything like complete enforce-
anent from the federal law in less
than that time, and they may be sur-
prised to learn that prohibition is
working In Maine now, and has been
for some years, by the admission of
its own governor.
In the teeth of the nullification
alarmists, Governor Brewster flings
the statement that for years after
the passage of the Maine law the
state was so evenly divided that there
was always a narrow margin between
the wet and dry candidates, and that
many county sheriffs ran on the plat-
form of the open saloon, and many
of them won, whereupon the saloons
In that county would remain open
and be raided once a year, when they
would pay a fine that amounted to a
license fee. If the wets who see
cause for alarm in the present situa-
tion can parallel that, then they have
a sales argument.
The people of Maine, however, as
Governor Brewster continues, finally
failed to elect this kind of sheriff,
even as some of the wet candidates
at present are failing of election.
Then Maine became dry, and Maine
is dry, and the rest of the country is
likely to become dry just as Maine
did.
Governor Brewster is very sensible,
however. He does not feel that we
can expect prohibition In 25 years
to be absolute, but we. can hope for
it, and hope that the nation as a
whole will not require much more
time to come to its senses than
Maine. No doubt the state felt the
same pains in going through its per-
iod of laxity that the United States
is now feeling in Its era of lawless-
ness and faulty enforcement. But
a fi.vna~ticAA lnvri ilv 41" frn

t

I T PAYS TO INSIST ARO I I

The Coolest Eatnig Place
in Town.
EXCELLENT MEALS.
Ladies and Gentlemen
Single' Meals - 54c, 65c
Weekly Board - $x.75
Cor. State and Washington
READ THE WANT ADS

ARROW
B ROADCLOTH
SHIRTS
WITH
COLLARS ATTACHED

,
r
,
f
1 It ,r

PARK
i

OF IMPORTED ENGLISH
BROADCLQTH OF PER-
MANENT LUSTER AND
GREAT DURABIIITY
CLUETr, PEABODY & CO. INC MAKERS

common man intoxicating liquor, and I maybe he is, the only trouble being
already the wet agitation has died that he has not demonstrated it yet.
to a mere hullabaloo for light wines
and beers or government sales. Any ONE OF THE GREAT problems the
measure which is so fundamentally governors are planning to discuss
right as the abolition of liquor is and solve is the preventing of future
bound to prevail in time, with the floods on the Mississippi river. We
growing enlightenment of public are somewhat of the opinion that even
opinion, for though America, like a the Congress of these United States
great giant, requires time to move, would have some trouble in making
it usually moves in the right direc- the river conform with a law against
tion. floods. If this august body, which in-
But it nothing more comes from the cludes the Senate, could not make the
Mackinac conference than the state- river behave, we think that the gov-
I ment of the governor of Maine, that j ernors may have more difficulty in
conference has been a success, for it doing so. Especially since they can
strikes at the heart of the lawless not make laws and can only grant
and reactionay element of the United pardons and reprieves, (as a certain
States; it brings even closer the day governor in the state that is known
which it anticipates, the day which as the Sucker state has too often
will see the complete oblivion of pro- demonstrated and as a governor in
hibition as a national issue; a day a certain state in New England has
which will only come after continued shown that tit can be done, but it
tireless efforts by the disciples of oughtn't to, accordingly he hesitates).
progress, and continued application of Perhaps they can pardon the river
the best enforcement official of them but they can not stop its flow unless
all-time. they bottle it.

.

THE PLAY CLASS
With the University's phenominal,
achievements in the line of dramat-
ics, brought to a climax each year
by the presentation of the Michigan
Union Opera, the productions of
minor, though able groups, are
eclipsed, and plays which elsewhere
would be impressive are allowed to
slip by with scarcely a notice.
This has happened time and time l
again with the public performances
given by the play class, and though
these actors are very capable, well
trained, sometimes talented, andI al-
ways enjoyable, the campus of the
University, satiated as it is with the
finest college dramatic presentations
in the country, pays them scant at-
tention.
This neglect must be discouraging
to those groups at times,. and this
summer again there will be public
presentations by the class members.
Of course they can scarcely compete
with the professional group of Rock-
ford Players, but fortunately they
have waited, and their per formances
won't take place until tbxe regular
summer season of plays has been com-
pleted. The night for which the per-
formances have been arranged is
August 10, and three pla37s, all one
acts, will be given.
The performance will be given in
Sarah aswell Angell hall, the home
of the Rockford Players, and if those
amima the summer tidernts who.

BUT LET THE GOVERNORS enjoy
themselves and they will come back
from their vacations better fitted to
do justice to their collegues in the
way of favors. We fear that our Fred
will be all run down in making an
effort to entertain the other execu-
tives.
SCENARIO CONTEST
BEING JUDGED
ROLLS SCENARIO judges are now
trying to pick a winner. They threw
all the manuscript at the ceiling and
resolved to award first prize to any
one that stuck, but none of them did
so now they shall have to read all
the submitted scenarios to pick a
winner, unless one of the judges finds
a new method of judging. It is hop-
ed that the winning scenario will be
filmed, but there is some matter of
doubt as to whether any of the pro-
ducers are worthwy of receiving the
contract, since only local talent will
be used as actors and actresses.
--Jeb.
have acquired the habit of attending
plays regularly can continue the cus-
tom an additional week they will be
supporting a worthwhile campus ac-
tivity, as well as being adequately en-
tertained. The University must avoid
the idea that it needs professional
companies to provide its dramatic
needs, and must always bear in mind.
that the Rockford Players themselves
were once students in the University
--remote though it may seem,

X XQUISITE flowered
-c chiffons... georgettes... -
fimylaces -theloveliest
styles of Summer - styles which
are now at their heighth-at prices
so drastically reduced thatyou
may enjoy luxurious fashions at
most thrifty prices.
$9.95 $14.75
} Every day new fall dresses come in from
New York. The summer frocks must be
cleared, away to make room for the fall
models. You will find all the mid-season
stock marked .at reduced prices. Dresses
that were formerly marked $14.75 are now
$9.95. Those valued at $19.75 and $25 are
now $14.75. Take advantage of these end-
of-the-season sales and buy exiensive
dresses at a moderate price.
(Second Floor)
222 S. Main Phone 4181

Back to Top

© 2021 Regents of the University of Michigan