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July 26, 1927 - Image 1

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Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1927-07-26

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Y'S EVENTS
ure - esidene
en's Educational

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.Lu".
:00-Men's Educational Club
:15i-"Fanny's First Play."

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MEMBER
ASSOCIATED
PRESS I

ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN, TUESDAY, JULY 26, 1927

VIII, No. 26

PRICE FIVE CENTS

ONIL ILL REVISE
INHSTRUCON ETHODS
INy PU BLiC SPE&KING
NEW HEAD OF DEPARTMENT
TO BEGIN GRADUATE'
INSTRUC'ION
NAME WILL BE CHANGED
"Department Of Speech" To Supplant
"Public Speaking"; Arrange To
Incorporate Phonetics
With the coming of Professor James
M. O'Neill the Speech departmnt of
the Uiversit yis to undergo a corn
4Aete revision this fall. Prof. O'Neill
ha' been the head of the Department
of Speech at the University of Wis-
consin, and has been chosen to fill the
vacancy left by the resignation of
Professor Thomas Trueblood.
Several important changes in the
"epartment are to be made. First off
all, the name is to be changed again.
The department, which was first
known as locution, then as Oratory,
a.d in recent years as Public Speak-,l
ing, will now be known as the De-}
partment of Speech.
The next important innovation is
the Inauguration of a Graduate school
of Speech. Never before has it been
possible to get more than a Master's1
degree, but from now on the graduate
work will be extended so that candi-r
dated for a Doctor's degree who sot
desire can obtain it in Speech. The
graduate courses will'include a Pro-
seminary in Speech, a Seminaryi in
Rhetoric and Oratory, both underA
Prof. O'Neill, Studies in Research and
Dramatics under Prof. Louis M. Eich,
Aatomy and Function of the Vocal
Organs, taught by Professors Muys-
kens and Huuber, and a Seminary in
The incorporgtion of the depart-
ment of Phonetics in the Departmentc
of Speech is also an important step.-
Courses in General Phonetics, English
Pohnetics and Voice Science, consist-.
ing of a stud yo the anatomy, physi-
ology, and physics of the human voice,t
will be taught by Professors Meader
and Muyskens. Psychology of Speecht
will be given under Professors. Pills-
bury and Meader,
Other courses to be given by Prof.
O'Neill are Argumentation and De-
bate, Advanced Debate, Speech Com-C
position, Rhetorical Theory, and the
Teaching of Speech.1
Dramatics will be in' charge of Mr.
$arl Wleischman, who will take ther
place of Mr. David Owen, recently
appointed to the faculty of North-t
western University.t
Under Prof. O'Neill's direction the
newly organized Department of
SpeetIh promises to become even more
popular and esteemed than before.
The University of Michigan is to .be
commended on reeciving the services
of a man who is so very eminent in
his field. -
SENATORS DESIRE
SPECIAL SESSION
(By Associated Press) .
WASRINGTON, July 25.-Two sen-l
ators, Smoot of Utah, and Harrison
of Mississippi, came to the capital1
today and immediately issued state-
ments 'urging President Coolidge to,
call Congress into special session.
Both declared this necessary to get

an early start on tax legislation, but
differed over the extent the prospec-
tive reduction should go. While
Sfnoot, who is chairman of the Senate
finance committee, suggested a cut of
$300,000,000, sHarrison came out for
half a billion, contending that Smoot
now proposed what the Democrats
ad attempted at the last sesssion.
he Mississippian also made;a pass-.
ng reference to the approaching pres-
dential campaign. Although refusing
,o discuss the prospective Democratic
nomination, he predicted that if Al
mith is nominated the ,South? will be
or him. He also said the New York
overnor has both friends and strong
pposition in the South.
ALRSHIP LANDS IN{ VTR*INIA
LANGLEY FIELD, Va., July 25.-
he army dirigible RS-1 arrived at
ngley Field at 7:5 a. m. today on
'e first leg of her 2,800-mile .test
ght from Scott Fild, Ill.

MORE INTEREST
IS MANIFESTED
IN SEA SCHOOL
New England and the East are in
the lead in registration for the Float-
ing University of 1927-28. The round-
the-world cruise, organized by A. J.
McIntosh in conjjunction with the
Cunard Line, will sail this year on
the steamship "Aurania," and . will
visit twenty-six countries.
So far the registrations, although
about equal in number, differ in rela-
tion to locality. Last year the ma-
jority of registrations came from the
middle West, with Missouria and
Kansas in the lead. This year New
England and the East are in the lead,
Massachusetts and New Jersey replac-
ing Missouri and Kansas. The regis-
tration from the University of Michi-
gan has not increased over last year,
but a more state--wide interest is,
evident. Wisconsin, which was hard-
ly represente last year, will have a
large delegation this year, due 'prob- I
ably to the fact that two prominent1
faculty members are going from that
state. i
California, important last year,
promises an even larger quota for
1927. The increase in the South will
be slight. Washington, Texas and1
New York City indicate about the
same registration as last year.
Registration will probably close
July 31. The "Aurania," one of the
latest Cunard vessels, will carry 500
men and women students and over 50
'teachers, who will study twenty-six
countries before their return to New
York on May 15, J928.
LINDBERGH MAKES1
OFFICIAL VISIT
(By Associated Prea)
CONCORD, N. H., July 25.-Col.
Charles A. Lindbergh paid his official
visit to Concord today and w s heart-I
Sirgeeted by thousands.."Contrasted
to the fog and wind he flew through
on Saturday and Sunday, he had per-
feet weather today for his return
flight from Portland, Maine. When
the, famous flyer tried to reach Port-
land from Boston last Saturday the
fog made it impossible for'him to lo-
cate a safe landing place, so he
turned and came to Concord airport.
As Concord had laid no plans for
an elaborate reception his visit Sat-
urday. night was regarded as unafi-
cial and he received no public wel-
come.
He flew back 'to Maine yesterday,
landing on Old Orchard beach,
whence he motored to Portland and
received the greeting of the state of
Maine. Then he drove back to Old
Orchard and easily took off from the
beach.
KING FERDINAND
BURIED TODA Y
(By Associated Press)
BUCHAREST, July 45.-King Fer-
dinand now rests under the soil at
Cuytea De Artes beside his ancestors.
The body of the monarch was lower-
ed into the grave today.
Destpite the fact that the body of
the late sovereign was emaciated from
his long illness in which he had lost
much weight, it was noticed that the
four ballbearers found the burden too
heavy. They staggered suddenly and,
whether by 'his own instance or be-
cause of prompting by Queen Marie,
Prince Nicholas rushed forward,
placed his shoulder under his father's
coffin.

Scarcely had the prince done this.
when a guest of wind blew the covers
from the king's mantle onto the
prince's shoulders.
EVOLUTION TO BE
MATHER'S SUBJECT
The 'Men's Educational club 'is to
hear, tonight at 7 o'clock, Professor,
Kirtley F. Mather speak; on "The
Teaching of Evolution in American]
Schools."
Preceding the address, Elmer Hess,
of Porat Huron, will play sevedal vio-
lin' selections, after which' Harry J.
,Tillotson wills inform the club mem-
bers about the distribution of football
tickets.I
Professor W. R. Buurton, of the
University of Chicago, will speak a
few words of greeting to the club as
a preface to Prof. Mather's lecture.

! 8
GiNGE~CHDISCUSSES,
MYTIIMFPOETSI
Comparison of Wordsworth and Blake
Is English Professor's Theme
In Summer Series Talk
BLAKE DIEDGENTURY AGO
William Blake, although a minor
poet, is one whose star has risen
higher and higher since his death 100
years ago, said Prof. S. F. Gingerich
of the English department, in his lec-1
ture on Blake and Wordsworth yeses
terday in Natural Science auditorium
as a number of the Summer session
series.
In his comparison of the two poets)
of the 18th century Prof. Gingerichf
said that he was not attempting to!
4 compare their greatness, for Words-
worth was a major and Blake a minor
poet. Wordsworth is the greater poet
because he wrote by the principles
of poetry while Blake followed the
principles of mysticism. Thus Words--
wort hexpressed many of the some'
mystic ideas that Blake did, but he
expressed them more clearly, gave
to them a classical interpretaeion and
'a concrete form.
They are comparable poets, said
Professor Gingerich, because they
were in the main contemporary, had
the same simplicity' of style, visualized
what they say around them, avoiding,
the said personifications of the poets
before them, and because they were
both mystics. Blake was the puref
mystic ,but Wordsworth was a mystic
in only one element, keeping his mys-
ticism within poetic limits, expressing
his visions clearly and tersely in the
climax of his poems, and retaining,
poetic imagery. His form of mysti-j

BURTON WILL GJVE
SERIES OF TALKS
Professor W. R. Burton ,of the Uni-
versity of Chicago, arrived yesterday!
for a two-day visit with faculty mem-
bers of the School of Education.
At 10 o'clock today Prof. Buurton
will speak on "Why Should I Be A
Teacher?" to the members of Prof.
S. A. Courtis' class of philosophy of
education. Prof. Raleigh Schorling's
class in the administration of high,
school supervision will hear Prof.
Burton lecture at 11 on "The Future
of Supervision in the High School."
Prof. Burton is working on the new
university movement fo rthe central-
ization of courses in allied subjects.
4At the University of Chicago he is
teaching a 12-hour course compriisng
what formerl yhad been three sep-
arate education courses.
Dean Edward H. Kraus in inter-
ested in Prof. Burton's idea, and at
{ present a committee of six members
of the faculty of the School of Educa-
tion are busy applying the scheme to
that school. The committee is com-
posed of Professors Edmonson,
Moehlman, Schorling, Trow, Courtis,
land Jackson.
SACCO, VANZETTI
INQUEST O V E R
(By Associated Press)
BOSTON, July L5.-The men who
were named by Gov Alvin T. Fuller to
make an independent inquiry into thec
case of Nicolo Sacco and Bartolomeo
Vanzetti, internationally known radi-1
cals, condemned to death for murder,"
today completed the assembling off
facts in their investigation. After
having taken the testimony of many]
witnesses during several weks, thel
advisory committee, made up of Pres.4
A. Lawrence Lowell of Harvard, Pres.I
Samuel Spartton, of M. I. T., andI
fnrn Ji d a nhr la.tf+h

GOVERNORS GIVE TALKS COVERING WIDE
RANGE OF TOPICS CONCERNING FEDERAL
POLICIES RELATION, TO, STATE RIHT

MACKINAC ISLAND WELCOMES
GOVERNORS WITH GREAT
ENTHUSIASM
BREWSTER, MAINE, SPEAKS
Shows How All Attempts To Secure
Government Aid For Merchant
Marine Have Failed
(By Associated Press)
MACKINAC ISLAND, July 25.-De-
claring himself heartily in favor of a
marked increase in the American
merchant marine, Governor Ralph O.

GREEN ADVOCATES ABOLITION OF
PROPERTY TARIFF UNLESS
REVISED
SHOULD KEEP POWER
Federal Trade Commission, Onter-
$tate Conimeree Commission
Should Me Regulated
(By Associated Press)
MACKINAC ISLAND, July 25.-Ab-
olition of the general property tax,
unless its operation can be made more
equitable, was advocated by Gover-

rm91r uage nooert Graxit of ttte l
im is thatfounda inpthe maoor share urt,met at the state house
of poets, even Shakespeare.; today to hear argumients, of the de-
Blake's mysticism, on the other'ted a t te cru ns. The ere
hand ocupie hi whle bing ac tense and state counsel. These were
hand, occupied his whole being, ac- completed at 5:30 o'clock and theI
'cording to Professor Gingerich, thus comple edwt'o uk an
making him put his poetry, especially Icommittee adjourned without an-
makng imputhispotry esecall Inouncing when they expected to make
his Prophetic Books, in a fo'rm hard their renort to the governor.
to understand concretely, but clearly, .
felt by the reader and appreciated for it has been expected the governor
t mithe ea dr a nds. Ba kpe' visions would make his second trip to
its emitional values. Blake' is I Charleston today, but when he left
were truly real to him and he was 1 his offce late in the afternoon he. an-

Brewster of Maine today today told nor Fred W. Green of Michigan in his
delegates at the nineteenth annual welcoming address before the nine-
confernce of governors, in sessiod teenth annual conference of gover
here, that the government of the nors here today.
United States "should not hesitate at While Michigan is deeply sensible
providing a necessary and adequate to the great honor you have conferred
permanent fleet to protect the inter- upon her and is anxious to be of every
ests of commerce." service, she is also hopeful that this
"I take it that practically all in- shall be a serious conference out of
formed Americans realize the neces- which will come clear, well-defined
sity of the American merchant ships," thoughts on state affairs," Governor
said Governor Brewster, "not only Green said, in opening his address.
from a commercia lviewpoint, but also "It is within your power to frankly
from the standpoint !of national de- and freely discuss public questions
fense. The statement last year by from the depth of your great exper-
our secretary of the navy, that tpday eaces and to aid greatly the cause of
a grea liner is of more importan e to good government."
the navy than a battleship, puts in "The gradual failure and increasing
concise form a very important propo- injustice of the general property tax
sition." is a problem that seems to face all of
"The fact, abundantly demonstrated us now," Governor Green told the as-
by statistics and physicially estab- semblag'e. Too much federal inter-
lished by the practical disappearance ferance in state affairs was decried by
of most American merchant ships the governor, and he declared that the
that have tried to live in our foreign only way to avert the danger of in-
trade, that because of greater capital terference is in "the way the found-
cost, higher overhead on .shore and ers-.expected that it would be averted
afloat, higher cost of subsistence on -through the eternal vigilance of the
shipboard, American ships cannot states themselves."
compete with foreign ships without I have Common Problems
government aid is so unassailably es- "Questions that have no interstate
tablished that the perverse critics aspects arise at the same time in
who deny it are so few and so open several antd' sometimes all of the
to suspicion of foreign affiliations or states," Governor Green said. "The
foreign inspiration, that I shall not development of the direct- primary
even comment on it." and the more" recent resort to the
Best Method Is Question gasoline tax for the purpose of high-
The best method of giivng govern- way financing are instances of this
ment aid to the shipping problem is type of problem. In dealing with
open for discussion, Governor Brew- such questions each state government
ster said. At present ,the aid is being must assume responsibility to its own
given in annual appropriations which people for it own policies, but there
enable the shipping board to main- ;would be advantage to all in an ex-
tain government lines. This means r change of ideas and especially of ex-
has been severely criticized by many. periences in such a meeting as this:
"Of course, critics of one method "Such another problem seems to me
may be presumed to be ready to offer, to face all of us now in the gradual
a better solution," the governor -failure and increasing injustice of
stated, "and I will let them do so. the property tax. This tax, which
But this I do say, and I say it with furnishes the principal basis of reve-
all the emphasis in my power: This nue for most of the states and cities,
country needs American ships to sus- was devised under circumstances
tain and develop American commerce. and to meet conditions that no long-
The fact that until the Shipping Board er prevail. Unless it can be made
established its South African service to apply equitably to present condi-
American experts to that country tions it must be abandoned. The
were being charged from 50 percent to general property tax, in operation at
75 percent more for ocean transporta- least, is founded on the supposition
tion than were competing goods from that real estate constitutes the bulk
Europe; and that as a result of this of all property and the principal
established American competition source of wealth. In a modern indus-
freight charges on American goods trial state this supposition is absurd.
were reduced from an average of $25 We must find a way to make the gene-
per ton to am.ut $10 per ton on both rai property tax bear upon personal
American awid foreign flagships sail- j and even intangible property or we
ing from the United States, is only must find some new tax system to dis-
on: of s r'al very practical illus- iace the present one."

without question sincere in his claim
that he saw and talked with them
just as he did with the creatures of
the "vegetable world."
"Blake attempted to seize reality in
his naked hand," said Professor Gin-
gerich. To him the spiritual world
was more real than the finite, and he
saw the eternal functioning in small
things exactly as it did in the great.
BASEBALL SCORES
("y Associated Press)
American League
Detroit, 5; Philadelphia, 6.
Cleveland, 9; Boston, 10.
National League
St. Louis, 2-3; Cincinnati, 3-4.
Pittsburgh, 0; New York, 1.
LEAGUE ST NDINGS
American League

nounced that he was going to his.
summer home in New Hampshire.
Sacco and Vanzetti today continued
their hunger strike which was under-
taken as a protest against the secrecy
with which, they said, the governor
had conducted his investigation. Yes-
terday Vanzetti broke his fast at
breakfast, but after this interlude the
"strike" was resumed. The men who
were sentenced to die in the electric
chair during the week of July 10 were
granted a respite until August 10 to
permit completion of the governor's
study of the case.
m
MINISTERS DECIDE
ON INSTRUCTIONS
(By Associated Press)
LONDON, July 25.-The Cabinet1
ministers, with the assistance of Lord
Balfour, were engaged for many
hours today in considering the posi-
tion of Geneva as it relates to the
Tri-partite Naval conference. They
first met in an informal conference,
and then in a regular cabinet council
they apparently decided against mak-
ing any statement to- Parliament to-
night.
Today's council was held to convey
to W. C. Bridgeman, first lord of the
British admiralty, and Viscount
Cecil, precise . instructions for their
guidance at Geneva and any addi-
tional suggestions for an agreement,
either from the America nor Japanese
delegates, and it was asserted afterf
council that the delegates now were
prepared for any' contingency that
might arise.

W
New York.........67
Washington.......53
Detroit ..... ...49
Athletics.4......049
Chicago ...........48
St. Louis.........3SS
Cleveland...........39
Boston.............25 ,
National League
W
Chicago...........55
Pittsburgh .. ...55
St. Louis..........52
New York..........50
Brooklyn ..........41
Cincinnati........40
Philadelphia........37
Boston.............34

L
26
38
40
43
47
52
55
67
L
36
35
39
46
50
52
51
52

Pct.
.720
.582
S.551
.533,
.505
.422
.4151
.272!
Pct.
.604
.600
.571
.521
.451
.435
.420
.391

trations which have been given me."
Governor Brewster termed thel
"scrapping of hundreds of vesselst
following the World war, which wast
carried out to prevent the domination <
of the seas by American vessels when #
Europe's ships were stricken by thet
grea tconflict, "a national sacrifice
unparalleled in the world's history."I
Declaring that he was discussing1
the matter from a non-political view-
point, "because it is a nonpolitical'
matter," the governor asked that all-
states put their influence behind the

Mentions Transportation Control
Another type of common problem of
the states is the one growing out of
the development in communication
and transportation during the past
few years, the governor said. It is
the problem of the constant increase
and encroachment of federal power.
"Although the government of the
United States has only those powers
that have been granted to it by the
states, the description of its author-
lty was, wisely, I think, couched in
such language as to give that author-

II

PEACE RESTORED
FOLLOWING RIOTS
(By Associated Press)
HAMMO\D, Ind., July 25.-Peace
was restored in Whiting today afterI
a series of violent outbreaks of fight-
ing between groups of native and for*
eign-born workmen in which more
than a score were slashed and beaten,
with one near death with a fractured
skull.

OurVeatherMu%
I -w
-Says it will be fair and warmer.
Perhtps showers.

matter and aid in the move to ity the elasticity necessity to meet
streng hen the merchant marine. changing conditions. In that elasti-
"A , t sPnt two thirds of the traffic1 city, however, there is danger to the
ihsdl id by foreign ships, because states and to the federal govern-
the policy of the shipping board, as ment itself. The danger can be
I understand it, is merely to keep in averted only in the way that the
service a numbe rof America nships founders expected that it' would be
sufficient to insure American cargoes! averted: through the eternal vigi-
as reasonable freight charges as those lance of the states themselves.
enjoyed by their competitors. "There is reason for the continu-
Government Fails To Aid ance of the state in all its autonomy
Every attempt to secure govern- and independence of action. There
m ent aid in the United States, since are problems that are not national.
(Continued on Page Four) (Continued on Page Four)

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