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October 11, 1995 - Image 2

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The Michigan Daily, 1995-10-11

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'2- The Michigan Daily - Wednesday, October 11, 1995

Israel releases prisoners, hands over office

I

Four Palestinian
women have been
denied release; 21
others stay in protest
Los Angeles Times
JERUSALEM - An Israeli-Pales-
tinian peace accord moved forward in
fits and starts yesterday when the Is-
Taeli government began releasing sev-
#eral hundred Palestinian prisoners amid
much confusion and handed over a mili-
tary occupation office in the West Bank
village of Salfit.
As the prisoner release began, an
adviser to Palestinian leader Yasser
.Arafat petitioned the Supreme Court to
override the government's refusal to
pardon femaleprisoners involvedin the
murder of Israelis.
Ahmad Tibi, a Palestinian citizen
of Israel, argued that the high court
should order the government to re-
spect the interim peace agreement
-signed by Prime Minister Yitzhak
Rabin and Arafat in Washington on
Sept. 28. The agreement calls for the
.release of all imprisoned Palestinian
women.
Four Palestinian women have been
.denied release - two by Israeli Presi-
dent Ezer Weizman and two by a West
Bank military commander following
his lead. At least 21 other female pris-
oners have refused to leave their cells
without them.
Early yesterday, Palestinian offi-

I

cials announced that the more than
1,000 Palestinian men who were
scheduled to be released would not go
unless all the Palestinian women were
also freed.
But soon, scores and then hundreds
ofPalestinian men emerged from prison,
all having complied with Israel's re-
quirement to sign a pledge not to use
terrorism.
Israeli television showed hundreds
of Palestinians greeting prisoners who
returned to the Palestinian-controlled
Gaza Strip with hugs and kisses and
shouts of "God is great."
Many Israelis fear Palestinians con-
victed of politically motivated crimes
will attack Israelis again as soon as they
are freed. Palestinians view the con-
victs as political prisoners who should
receive amnesty like any soldier at the
end of a war.
Israeli authorities estimated that about
500 common criminals and 500 Pales-
tinians convicted ofsecurity crimes will
have been freed by today.
The prisoner release overshadowed
the fact that Israel took its first steps
toward ending its 28-year occupation
of the West Bank yesterday with the
closure of four occupation offices.
The office in Salfit, about 30 miles
north of Jerusalem, was handed over
to Palestinians in a signing ceremony
while hundreds of Palestinians chanted
"PLO! Israel no!" and waved Pales-
tine Liberation Organization flags out-
side.

NATIONAL REPORT
American wins Nobel Economics Prize
CHICAGO - A University of Chicago professor won the
Nobel Prize in economics yesterday for demonstrating how
people's fears and expectations can frustrate policymakers'
efforts to shape the economy.
Robert Lucas' work is now part of the "standard toolbox" of
all economists, said the Royal Swedish Academy of Sciences
in Stockholm.
Lucas found that government attempts to regulate unem-
ployment and investment by regulating the national money
supply often are undermined by the way people adjust their
spending decisions and other behavior.
For instance, if the Federal Reserve raises interest rates to Lucas
slow economic growth and prevent inflation, people might
stop taking out loans and making major purchases. That, in turn, could cause a
recession and force the Fed to cut rates.
"Models that we thought were guiding the fine-tuning of the economy through
monetary and fiscal policy are more or less useless," Lucas said after winning the
prize. "Those models presumed a lot of stupidity on the part of the ordinary
citizen."

p

Perot's party coming
up short in California
LOS ANGELES - With less than
two weeks to the qualifying deadline,
preliminary voter-registration figures
from California counties critical to Ross
Perot's hopes of creating a new na-
tional political party indicate that so
far, the Texas billionaire's effort is fall-
ing far short of the goal.
To qualify in California - the first,
and perhaps most critical, test of the
proposed new party's appeal - Perot
and his supporters must register 89,007
new party members by Oct. 24. But
yesterday, voter registrars for Orange
and San Diego counties reported that so
far, only 437 people had signed up as
new members of the proposed Reform
Party.
"I think we're all optimistic," said
Perot's spokeswoman Sharon Holman,
arguing that the figures released yester-
day were stale.
Perot, himself, triedto boost theparty
in satellite television broadcasts yester-
day to local television stations. He also
filled in as the host of a San Diego radio
station talk show.

If Perot fails in California, even if it
is a matter of legal logistics and lack of
time, it will be difficult for his party to
be a major force in the 1996 presiden-
tial campaign, observed veteran cam-
paign consultant Darry Sragow of Los
Angeles.
Columbia launch set
for this Saturday
CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. -NASA
will try for the fifth time Saturday to
launch space shuttle Columbia on a
laboratory-research mission.
Columbia has been grounded for the
past two weeks by a leaky engine valve,
sluggish hydraulics, and most recently,
a failed computer signal-relay box.
Hurricane Opal also caused a delay.
Mission managers decided last night
to try again this weekend to launch
Columbia on the 16-day mission as
opposed to letting Atlantis fly next.
Atlantis is due to lift off Nov. 1 on its
second trip to Russia's space station
Mir. That mission will be delayed about
a week if Columbia goes because NASA
requires at least five days between
shuttle landings and launches.

AP PHOTO

Palestinians hoist their flag on Israeli military offices yesterday.

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EEIAE U EAULI 0

SENATE
Continued from Page 1
But Kingdon said Nunn and other
Democrats retired because they did not
foresee the Democrats taking control of
the Senate in the next election.
"There's less reason to be in office,
there's fewer things they can do in the
minority," Kingdon said. "The thing
that's common to all of them is they can
see the Senate in Republican hands for
quite a while."
LSA senior Mark Fletcher, state chair
for the College Republicans, said the
Democratic retirements will' solidify

GOP control.
"The Republican Party is going to
become the dominant party for at least
the near future," Fletcher said. "I think
the only chance (the Democrats) have
is if the Republicans don't live up to
their promises, namely the Contract
With America."
College Democrats co-chair Dave
Donoghue, an Engineering senior, said
his group is sad to see Nunn'scareerin the
Senate come to an end, but he said it will
allow the party tobring in new leadership.
"I think the Democratic Parlyadefi-
nitely has a chance to take the Senate in
'96 with President Clinton's strong lead-
ership," he said.

,:

-- - -

SA R OU ND T HE WORL D
Belgian commi51on unclear whe
sign or ask to
begins probe of The re-eme
NATO chif Uaes
NA1 0 did aaeS at aotie itd
dedicated lea
BRUSSELS, Belgium-- In a devel-
opment that could distract, even weaken, "
NATO's leadership, the alliance's se-
nior-most official, Secretary-General SaVe it:
Willy Claes, has once again become
embroiled in a domestic political scan- CAIRO, E
dal in his native Belgium. earthquakesr
With Claes proclaiming his inno- ened the allu
cence, a special Belgian parliamentary three famedp
investigative commission met for the breath of mil
first time yesterday to weigh more than Egyptiana
700 pages of evidence gathered by state locked the d
prosecutors that allegedly link Claes to pyramid yest
illegal contributions made to his Flem- months so v
ish Socialist Party party six years ago. humidairsap
About $2 million in so-called gifts and restorers
came to the party from the Italian de- stone walls.
fense contractor Agusta shortly after Vapor fro
the company won a major contract to lion touristsa
supply helicopters to the Belgian army. the 4,600-y
Claes was economics minister at the Cairo, drawin
time and helped negotiate the Agusta stone blocks
contract. Flaking,y
Claes is scheduled to appear before chipped off,
the commission Friday; next week, the beneath. In o
panel is expected to recommend to the and pebbles h
full Belgian Parliament whether to lift pushed again
his immunity from prosecution. on moisture
A parliamentary decision to lift the visible every
immunity would almost certainly be
followed by an indictment. It remains -

ther Claes would then re-
o step aside temporarily.
iergence of the scandal is a
to the alliance and comes
desperately needs strong,
adership.
id closed to
frorntourists
gypt - Neither wars nor
nor Mother Nature damp-
re of Chephren, one of the
pyramids of Giza. But the
lions of tourists did.
antiquities officials pad-
door on the 450-foot tall
lerday, closing it for three
acuums can suck out the
Aping its structural strength
can preserve flaking, lime-
rm the breathing of 2 mil-
a year has taken its toll on
ear-old pyramid outside
ng salts from its huge lime-
and weakening them.
yellowed limestone has
revealing a white surface
ne tunnel, a heap of rocks
has fallen, swept into a pile
st the wall. Cracks blamed
seeping into the rock are
'where.
From Daily wire services

r I

How did the universe come into
existence? Has it always existed?
Or did it have a beginning? Are the
laws of physics the products of
chance, or have they been
designed? Is there any knowable
existence beyond the dimensions of
the universe?
Dr. Hugh Ross, astrophysicist and
noted author, will provide some
answers at The Veritas Forum. Dr.
Ross held a five-year post-doctoral
fellowship at the California Institute
of Technology. He is currently the
president and founder of Reasons
to Believe.
A time of Q&A will follow.

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PHOTOl Jonathan luune, Editor

Wed., Oct. 11
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