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September 29, 1995 - Image 2

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The Michigan Daily, 1995-09-29

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2 - The Michigan Daily - Friday, September 29, 1995

Ttat DuiomsTkDlt RESICNAnot4

t

DUDERSTADT-
Continued from Page 1
campus today who said she will want to
wait until we have a new president."
Thomas Roach, a former regent who
was on the presidential search committee
in 1987, said that a transition would be
hindered by so many interim positions.
"The (provost) is clearly the right
bower at the University -he is the No.
2 man," Roach said. "It's going to make
it a little more difficult to have an in-
terim provost."
But Duderstadt said he remains con-
fident that there will be a smooth tran-
sition and in Machen's ability to serve
indefinitely as provost.
- Daily Staff Reporter Ronnie
Glassberg contributed to this report.

Administrators view president's resignation as a loss for'U'

By Josh White
Daily Staff Reporter
Following President James J.
Duderstadt's announcement that he will
resign this summer, University admin-
istrators have expressed surprise at the
sudden move.
Interim EngineeringDean Glenn Knoll
said Duderstadt will be missed after he
vacates the helm of the University.
"It will be a big loss for the Univer-
sity," Knoll said. "He has been a good
and effective president. I personally
regret to see him leave."
Knoll said the announcement was
not shocking, but came unexpectedly.
"It came as a surprise that he made

the announcement (yesterday) that he
would step down this year," Knoll said.
"The president has said openly in the
past that he would not finish his term at
the University as president."
Vice President for Student Affairs
Maureen A. Hartford, who learned of
Duderstadt's resignation last night, said
Duderstadt was a great president.
"You will hear from me a sadness
about all of this," Hartford said. "He
hired me and I have admired what he
has done for this University. There is a
toll that the job of president takes on a
person. I couldn't stay with that job for
eight years.
"But great universities always goon,"
she said. "We will perhaps lose some
momentum. He had a great deal of
energy, enthusiasm and loyalty for this

school."
Hartford also said his resignation
will be a loss for students. "He has
cared a lot about students," Hartford
said. "He was not as much a one-on-
one president as those at small liberal-
arts schools, but he listened and tried
to respond. I think he really enjoyed
the students here."
LSA Dean Edie N. Goldenberg said
Duderstadt will be remembered for
many accomplishments.
"I am surprised at the timing, but I
respect his decision," Goldenberg said.
"He's given a lot of years of service. I
think there are a number of impressive
things he will be remembered for. One
of them will be the remaking of Cen-
tral Campus. Another is his emphasis
on diversity through both the (Michi-
gan) Mandate and the (Agenda for
Women).
"When the history books get written,
I think they will look back and have

important things to point to."
Interim Provost J. Bernard Machen
said he enjoyed working with the presi-
dent. "With his energy and his vision, I
believe that his programs, especially
the Michigan Mandate and Agenda for
Women, will endure," Machen said. "It
will be hard to find someone with his
drive and energy."
Chief Financial Officer Farris
Womack did not have much to say
about Duderstadt's resignation.
"I think that the decision was his,"
Womack said. "Yes, it was a surprise. I
hope that it does not have any sort of
negative impact on the University."
Members of two regional campuses
in Flint and Dearborn pointed to the
stability of Duderstadt's presidency.
Flint Campus Chancellor Charlie
Nelms said Duderstadt's resignation
came "out of the blue," according to
Donna Ullrich-Eaton, director of Uni-
versity relations for the Flint campus.

Ullrich-Eaton said she does not ex-
pect any major changes in Flint as a
result of Duderstadt stepping down, and
said that is mainly due to Duderstadt's
trust in the chancellors.
"We account for only $40 million of
a more than $2 billion budget, and we
realize that there was so much more for
the president to lead," she said. "He had
to depend on the chancellors and we.
have the sense that he has allowed the
chancellors to lead their campuses. We
don't believe that his departure will
cause any serious changes here."
Terry Gallagher, director of public
relations at the Dearborn campus, said,
"Our relationship with the central cam-
pus is very stable and I trust that the
transition to a new president will also
be smooth."
"We have been allowed to develop a
distinctive identity and have been pros-
pering and thriving under that policy,"
he said.

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Lawmakers reflect on
Dude rs tadt'stenure
By Ronnie Glassberg Creek), a University alum, said the
Daily Staff Reporter University's problems with Lansing are
When James J. Duderstadt steps down caused by jealousy from other schools.
as University president in June, he will "They all would like to be the Uni-
leave behind a rocky relationship with versity of Michigan," he said. "I con-
Lansing and a position of respect in sider some of the attitudes as simply
Washington. reaffirming the fact that the University
In May, a panel of three state law- of Michigan is a great university that
makers said the University was doing a the others would like to emulate."
poor job of selling itself. Sen. Alma Last winter, the University faced a
Wheeler Smith (D-South Lyon) criti- struggle with the Legislature when state
cized the administration for appearing Rep. Morris Hood (D-Detroit) added
arrogant. an amendment to the University's state
"I think as the head of the University, appropriation that would have cut the
yes (Duderstadt) certainly did (appear appropriation increase because the num-
arrogant)," Smith said yesterday. "But ber ofnon-residents had increased above
that relationship between the Legisla- 30 percent.
ture and the University of Michigan has The penalty was removed from the
been similar regardless of who's held final legislation, and the University
the president's chair." admitted an additional 333 in-state stu-
LanaPollack,whoservedasstatesena- dents in a goodwill gesture.
tor from 1983-1995, said Duderstadt's U.S. Rep. Lynn Rivers (D-Ann Ar-
strength was not relations with Lansing. bor) said she was surprised that
"He had a real commitment to diver- Duderstadt made the decision to leave.
sity, and I think that's really positive. I "I think that under his leadership, the
will always associate that achievement University has been a national leader,"
with him," Pollack said. "But I don't Rivers said. "I would hope whoever
think he was ever comfortable in Lan- succeeds him will remain in the fore-
sing, and I don't think his strong suit front on education."
was relations with Lansing." Associate Vice President for Govern-
Despite the difficulties with the Leg- ment Relations Thomas Butts, the
islature, Duderstadt said Lansing poli- University's Washington lobbyist, said
tics did not play a role in his resignation. Duderstadtishighly regarded inthe nation's
"I'm not of those people who loves capital, noting that he is a member and
politics. There's always very conten- formerchairoftheNational Science Board.
tious issues," Duderstadt said. "There "I talked to several members, all of
are years where it's difficult with Lan- whom expressed surprise and regret," he
sing and years when it's not." said. "Just because he leaves the presi-
State Rep. Mary Schroer (D-Ann dency doesn't mean he will nolonger be
Arbor) said she thinks the University a leader on national education issues."
learned a lot from its problems with the State Rep. Liz Brater (D-Ann Arbor)
Legislature this year. said Duderstadt's work on diversity was
"This would not havebecome aprob- a strength of his tenure. "I think he's
lem had Michigan State not become so done a number of important things in
aggressive in their lobbying," she said. terms of working on affirmative action
"They changed the way the game is and diversity on campus," she said.
played in Lansing." -Daily Staff Reporter Amy Klein
State Sen. John Schwarz (R-Battle contributed to this report.

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STUDENTS
Continued from Page 1
ing for a diverse campus. "The presi-
dent was very instrumental in imple-
menting and committed to carrying out
programs which support otherwise dis-
advantaged students.
"I wish him the best and look forward
to a good working relationship with his
successor," Rose said.
Some students had a more casual
view toward Duderstadt's departure.
"I guess he's not the focus of cam-
pus," said LSA senior Carrie Currer.

"If he goes, somebody else will come
- it's not a big deal. It doesn't really
affect me."
LSA senior Michelle Lee agreed: "I
don't think Duderstadt figures very
much in campus life. Not many people
worry about him."
Still, many students said they will be
sad to see him go.
"I'm sorry to hear that he will be
resigning," said LSA junior Amy St.
Claire. "I hear that he resigned because
he wanted to go back to teaching (since)
he's accomplished all the goals he
wanted in his position. I think those are
good reasons and I respect that."

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