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September 22, 1995 - Image 2

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The Michigan Daily, 1995-09-22

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2 - The Michigan Daily - Friday, September 22, 1995
Fresh clashes erupt in West Bank

NABLUS, West Bank (AP) - The
sights and smells in this West Bank city
yesterday were eerily familiar, remi-
niscent of six years of Palestinian re-
volt.
Israeli soldiers, sitting in the backs of
jeeps with assault rifles, chased Pales-
tinian stone throwers through streets
littered with twisted metal and other
debris. The stench ofburningtires mixed
with the sting of tear gas.
Iron shop doors in the old market
district were shuttered as part of a strike
protesting the killings of two Palestin-
ians by Israeli troops during riots
Wednesday.
The clashes in Nablus were a re-
minder that violence lurks just under
the surface in the West Bank, violence
that could erupt in full force should

Israeli and PLOCnegotiators fail to reach
agreement on expanding self-rule.
The two sides, already more than a
year behind schedule, are hung up over
security questions that top-level talks
this week have failed to resolve.
"If we come to the conclusion that
there is no peace, I think our young
people will fight," said Mayor Ghassan
Shakaa, speaking in his office deco-
rated with a framed portrait of PLO
chief Yasser Arafat and a bed sheet-
sized Palestinian flag.
"I don't think it will be like in the
uprising, with stones," Shakaa added
ominously, referring to the 1987-93 re-
volt against Israeli occupation that
helped bring both sides to the negotiat-
ing table. His unspoken suggestion:
Some Palestinians might resort to guns.

His words were punctuated by the
booms of tear gas canisters fired by
Israeli soldiers dispersing stone
throwersjust a few hundred yards away.
The road outside Shakaa's office,
like all down-town thoroughfares, were
littered with stones, scrap metal and
dumpsters used as makeshift roadblocks
to slow army jeeps.
The latest violence in Nablus began
Wednesday morning, when PLO activ-

recognized several Israeli undercover
agents who had blended into the crowd,
carrying stones. When spotted, the
agents opened fire, Abed said.
Nashaat Haroun, 24, was killed and
11 were wounded, including Abed, who
was recovering from shots in the right
arm and thigh at Raffidiyeh Hospital.
The army denies undercover troops were
at the scene.
Despite the violence, there were some

AUINAL REPORI
Quayle to lead Dole's political group
WASHINGTON - In a dramatic overture to social conservatives, GOP
presidential front-runner Bob Dole announced yesterday that
Dan Quayle would take charge of a political committee Dole
has used to support Republican candidates for nearly two Y .
decades.
In becoming chairman of Campaign America, the former
vice president did not endorse Dole's presidential campaign.
But Dole aides predicted the association would solidify Dole's
standing with Christian conservatives, an important Republi-
can primary constituency.
"I can think of no American who is better qualified to lead the Quay
battle for Republican victories in the vital elections that lie ahead," Dole, the Senate
majority leader, said in a statement. "Dan Quayle has been a trailblazer for issues and
ideas that sparked the Republican revolution of 1994. At the helm of Campaign
America, he is sure to keep up that fight."
Quayle was on the verge of entering the 1996 presidential race himself earlier
this year, but abruptly changed his plans after assessing the daunting fund-raising
and organizational hurdles. He later ruled out running for Indiana governor next
year but said he would like to seek the presidency down the road.

ists called a gen-
eral strike in soli-
darity with de-
tainees held by
Israel. A key
sticking point in
the Israel-PLO
peace talks is the
fate of5,000 Pal-
estinians in Is-
raeli jails.
As schools let
out Wednesday,
a group of stu-
dents pelted an
Israeli police van

we come to
the conclusion that
threI no peace, I
hink our young
OOPIO Win rght
-Ghassan Shakaa
Mayw of Nablus, West Bank

signs that life in
Nablus, the West
Bank's largest
city with 125,000
people, has
changed for the
better since the
start of Israel-
PLO peace talks
two years ago.
In the down-
town battle zone,
several luxury
apartmentandof-
fice towers in

with stones. Police

opened fire, killing 17-year-old Omar
Ghazawi. His body was laid onto a
wooden stretcher, wrapped in a Pales-
tinian flag and carried through the
streets. Thousands followed the funeral
procession, chanting, "With our spirit,
with our blood, we will redeem you,
martyr."
More clashes erupted in the evening
near the Israeli military headquarters.
Muayed Abed, a 22-year-old house
painter, said he and his friends were
throwing stones at soldiers when they

gleaming white Jerusalem stone have
gone up, a sure signal of investors'
confidence in a better future.
Along the main road, construction
workers ignoring the general strike laid
bricks and mixed cement to keep up
with the peace-propelled building boom.
The city now employs some 200 mu-
nicipal policemen trained by Arafat's
security forces in a first sign of Pales-
tinian authority.
However, the Israeli troops are still
in the streets, and Palestinians in Nablus
are getting impatient to see them go.

GOP proposes high
premiums in House
Medicare plan
WASHINGTON - With Democrats
vowing a fight to the end, House Repub-
licans sketched a future for Medicare
yesterday that blends cost controls on
doctors and hospitals with higher premi-
ums for senior citizens and sweeteners to
nudge them into cheaper alternatives.
"No one should be forced to choose,
but everyone should have the right to
choose" an alternative to the 30-year-old
fee-for-service coverage, House Speaker
Newt Gingrich said, providing partial
details of a plan intended to achieve
$270 billion in savings over seven years.
Democrats said the changes were de-
signed to finance GOP tax cuts for the
rich -not to shore up the solvency of
the Medicare system, as Republicans
contended. "We may lose, but we're
goingtogo down fighting," vowed House
Minority Leader Dick Gephardt(D-Mo).
To underscore their determination to
resist, Democrats vowed to hold a hear-
ing today on the lawn outside the Capitol
to compete with the formal session held

indoors by Republicans.
The House Commerce Committeewas
expected to finish work on the Medicaid
bill today. It would cut the program's
growth rate in halfand is intended to save
$182 billion over seven years by ending
federal rules forhealth care programs and
giving block grants to states.
Lions killed after
escaping compound
LAVA HOT SPRINGS, Idaho -
Hunters yesterday killed 15 lions whose
escape from achickenwire-enclosedgame
compound for lions, tigers and crossbred
"ligers" forced parents to keep their chil-
dren indoors.
Authorities said they didn't think any
more of the big cats were on the loose.
The animals escaped Wednesday night
from the private Ligertown Game Farm
Inc. in rural southeastern Idaho, prompt.
ing officials to call parents early yester-
day and warn them not to send their
children to school.
Ligertown owners Robert Fieber and
Dotti Martin were treated for minor inju-
ries at a hospital Wednesday after tty.
were attacked by at least one of the cats.

Rel iaious
Services
AVAVAVAVA
GRACE BIBLE CHURCH
1300 South Maple Rd.
Studying God's Word
Worshipping with God's People
Living out God's Mission
9:30 a.m. Sunday school-prayer, bible study.
10:45 a.m. Morning service-worship,
praise and prayer, Scripture exposition.
"Gruffled Feathers"
Rev. Russell Kaufman, Pastor
Catch the Church Van or call
Peter Kroll, Campus Coordinator: 761-7070
PACKARD ROAD BAPTIST CHURCH
Contemporary worship serices at 9:00 am
and 12 Noon on Sundays. Bible study for
students at 10:30 am. 2580 Packard Road.
971-0773. Small-Group bible studies and
student activities weekly.

YEPLLOW
CAB
2050 Commerse Ann Abor, MI 48103
663-3355
Largest and newest fleet
4 can share the fare
Service to metro airport
Night Ride service 663-3888
24 Hour Taxi Service

:''

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AROUND THE WORLD
ment with re
dent Dzhokhl
focuses Kremlin on collapse.
domestic terrorism U.S.un
MOSCOW - Elite paramilitary Service
troops stormed a bus where gunmen
were holding 18 people hostage in the status
volatile Caucasus yesterday, freeing the
captives, seizing the perpetrators and TOKYO -
rectifying somewhat the bungling im- tional furorc
age of Russia's anti-terrorist forces. 12-year-oldI
But the tense, daylong standoff in the U.S. service
republic of Dagestan, and several fresh Japan agree
incidents of insurgency in neighboring accord thatg
Chechnya, have served to remind the tary stationi
Kremlin ofits unresolved conflicts with status in cri
the restless regions of Russia's south- However,
ern fringes. Minister Yo
Federal authorities made no immedi- dor Walter M
ate connection between the hostage- United State
taking in the Dagestani capital of tially chang
Makhachkala and the rekindling ten- ingnumbero
sions in Chechnya, but it fit into a pat- The bilate
tern ofterrorist acts that have racked the ment gives t]
Caucasus region since Russian federal its personne
forces attacked Chechen rebels in De- crimes off-b
cember. by local auth
A day after an assassination attempt now are aski
against President Boris Yeltsin's spe- "They sh
cial envoy in the Chechen capital, first of all,"
Grozny, another suspicious explosion Murayama t
rocked the shattered city's oil refinery, The rapec
and two Russian soldiers were taken the three ser
captive by rebel gunmen, Russian me- fecture (stat
dia reported. elementary-9
The series of incidents compelled from a groce
Moscow to recognize that its July agree- -

bels loyal to ChechenPresa-
ar M. Dudayev is at risk of
likely to alter
men's legal
Dverseas
- Amid an escalating na-
over the alleged rape of a
Japanese schoolgirl by three
men, the United States and
d yesterday to review an
grants the American mili-
ed in Japan special legal
minal investigations.
in a meeting with Foreign
hei Kono, U.S. Ambassa-
londale made clearthatthe
s did not intend to substan-
e the agreement, as a grow-
ofJapanese are demanding.
ral Status of Forces Agree-
he U.S. military custody of
el accused of committing
ase, until they are indicted
horities. Japanese officials
ing for immediate custody.
ould be handed over to us,
Prime Minister Tomoichi
old Kyodo News Service.
occurred on Sept. 4, when
rvicemen in Okinawa pre-
te) allegedly abducted the
school girl on her way hom
ery store.
From Daily wire sermicbs

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-.~fn A { CTA CCJ. Myir-he) ' nc Uhnct lrY inv n (hin

M

14 i~77i H:ml

NEWS Nate H e y, MagI g EdintEr
EDITORS: Jonathan Bemndt. Lisa Dines. Andrew Taylor. Scot Woods.
STAFF: Cathy Boguslasi, Kiran Chaudhri. Jodi Cohen. Sam T. Dudek. Lenny Feller, Jennifer Fried, Ronnie Glasaberg, Jennifer
Harvey, Amy Klein. Stephanie Jo Klein, Tali Kravitz, Will McCahill, Gail Mongkolpradit, Tim O'Conn. Lisa Ports. Zachary M.
Raimi. Megan Schimpf, Maureen Sirhai. Matthew Smart. Michelle Lee Thompson. Josh White.
CALENDAR: Josh White.
EDITORIAL Ja Decker, Jamnes Nash, Editors
ASSOCIATE EDITORS: Adrienne Janne. Joel F. Knutson.
STAFF: Bobby Angel. Patience Atkin, James R. Cho, Zach Gelber, Ephraim R. Gerstein. Keren Kay Hahn, Judith Kaika, Chris
Kaye. Jeff Keating, Jim Lasser, Ann Markey, Brent McIntosh, Partha Mukhopadhyay. Scott Pence, David Schultz, Jean Twenge.
Matt Wimsatt.
SPORTS Antoine Pitts, Munagng Editor
EDITORS: Darren Everson. Brent Mclntosh,, Barry Sollenberger, Ryan White.e
STAFF: Paul Barger. Scott Burton, DorothyChambers, Nicholas 1. Cotsoniks, Susan Dann. Sarah DeMar. Alan Goldenbech.
James Goldstein, Chaim Hyman, Julie Keating, John Leroi, Marc Lightdale. Chris Murphy, Monica Polakov. Jed Rosenthal,
Danielle Rumore. Brian Sklar, Tim Smith. Dan Stiliman, Doug Stevens.
ARTS Heather PkaNes, Alexmn a Twin, Editors
EDITORS: Missa Rose Bernardo (Theater), Emily Lambert (Fine Arts). Brian Gnatt (Music). Joshua Rich (Film). Jennifer
Buckley (Weekend). Karl Jones (Weekend).
STAFF: Dean Bakopoulos, Matt Benz. Eugene Bowen, Mark Carison. David Cook. Thomas Crowley. Ella de Leon, Lisa Harwib,
Josh Herrington Scott Plagenhoef. Matthew Steinhauser. Prashant Tamaskear. Ted Watts. Michael Zilberman.
PHOTO Jonathan L. EitWr

91

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